Where's My Country?


Introduction (Disclaimers)
Annexations and Occupations | Country Splits and Unifications | Moving Countries | Roving Clubs
'host' index | 'guest' index
overview of European 'double' champions
About this document

Introduction

In the course of history, many football clubs have competed in the league and/or cup structure of more than one country, whether due to annexation or occupation (including colonial rule), or because their country split or unified (or both). Some countries, in particular Poland, have had their borders moved by hundreds of kilometres in the twentieth century, with obvious consequences for the clubs in the areas involved. In addition, some clubs have opted to play across the border, in particular in the United Kingdom where the football associations do not actually correspond to independent states, but also elsewhere.

This file aims to highlight various aspects of such performances abroad, organised according to the aforementioned four types of moving across borders (or borders being moved):

1. Annexations and Occupations
2. Country Splits and Unifications
3. Moving Countries
4. Roving Clubs

Note that these four categories are not entirely disjoint; in particular the distinction between the first two may be contentious in some cases (e.g. the Baltic countries, which for practical reasons are discussed together with all other Soviet republics in the second category); likewise between the first and the third, and one may debate the voluntarity of Derry City's choice to play in the Republic of Ireland rather than the section of the island that did not separate from the United Kingdom. The last category also includes a short section on currently Greek clubs that were founded in current Turkey; in this case it was not the borders moving but the clubs (or rather the Greek community on which they were based).

At the end of this introduction, two alternative indexes are given, one by 'host' country and one by 'guest' country.

The focus is on teams doing well across the border (winning leagues or cups, or reaching far in either) but examples of less successful clubs are given as well where it seemed justified (and the relevant information was available). Therefore, treatment of e.g. constituent republics of the former Soviet Union or Yugoslavia is not 'equal'; dominant regions (Russia and the Ukraine for the Soviet Union, Serbia and Croatia for Yugoslavia) obtain a less detailed presentation than the other regions.
An overview of European clubs winning championships in two different countries (according to customary definitions in world football) is given at the end.

In the results overviews throughout the document (the parts in pre-formatted text), 'foreign' winners of a competition (whether championship or cup) are given in bold face, runners-up in italics (with one exception from this convention, in the section on overseas clubs in the French cup).
In addition, the text sections have a number of clubs shown in bold face to stress their performances, according to the discretion of the author. The text sections also have non-English words shown in italics, as customary in English language texts.

Disclaimers

Given the topic, some political background here and there is unavoidable; no offence is meant to any of the countries or ethnic groups involved though the subjective point of view of the author may shine through at one or two places.

In all section and subsection headings, we refer to current and past names of countries (or regions which de facto (if not de iure) have or had independent football competitions, e.g. Northern Cyprus and Kosovo); this does of course not necessarily mean that the entire country or region was part of the football structure of another one but (apart from cases under the fourth category of 'roving clubs') at least some part nowadays within its borders. More precise information is given in the text. Also note the use of contemporary notions may be anachronistic in texts discussing historical situations.

Inclusion or non-inclusion of various cases may be debatable. For instance, the one-season (1999/00) appearance of Gozo FC in the Maltese top division is not included, although the island of Gozo has its own FA and an independent league structure (in which Gozo FC never played), as the fact that Gozo is an integral part of Malta has not been in doubt since 1800 (and football came to the islands much later), and its FA has never entertained any thought of independent membership of FIFA or UEFA (and would stand no chance of obtaining it). Likewise, there is no separate mention of e.g. the performances of the Canary Islands clubs Las Palmas and Tenerife in the Spanish football structure, nor of the Ceuta and Melilla sides (as these clubs have never played outside of Spain), but the single season of Atlético Tetuán in the Primera División is mentioned as the town is now in Morocco.

Additional information and factual corrections (whether on football, geography or history) are very much welcomed by the author; political comments will be ignored.

Index by 'Host' Country

NB: 'guest' countries in alphabetical order between brackets.

Albania (Kosovo)
Armenia (Azerbaijan)
Australia (Malaysia | New Zealand)
Austria (Czech Republic | Hungary | Italy | Liechtenstein | Poland | Slovenia | Ukraine)
Bulgaria (Greece | Macedonia)
Cambodia (Japan)
Canada (Saint Pierre et Miquelon)
Chile (Palestine)
China (Hongkong | Malaysia | Philippines | Thailand | Tibet)
Comoros (Mayotte)
Croatia (Bosnia and Herzegovina | Serbia)
(All) Cyprus (Northern Cyprus)
Czechoslovakia (Czech Republic (1918-1938) | Czech Republic (1944-1993) | Slovakia (1918-1938) | Slovakia (1944-1993) | Ukraine)
Egypt (Palestine)
England (Channel Islands | Northern Ireland | Scotland | Wales)
Ethiopia (Eritrea)
Finland (Russia (type 3) | Russia (type 4))
France (Algeria | French Guyana | Guadeloupe | Martinique | Mayotte | Monaco | Morocco | New Caledonia | Reunion | Saar | Spain | Tahiti (French Polynesia) | Tunisia)
Georgia (Abkhazia | South Ossetia)
Germany (Austria (type 1) | Austria (type 4) | Belgium | Czech Republic (type 1) | Czech Republic (type 4) | Denmark | East Germany | France (type 1) | France (type 3) | Lithuania | Luxembourg | Poland (type 1) | Poland (type 3) | Russia | Saar | Slovakia | Slovenia | Ukraine)
Greece (Cyprus)
Guyana (Antigua | Barbados | Saint Lucia | Trinidad and Tobago | USA)
Hongkong (China)
Hungary (Austria | Croatia | Romania (type 1) | Romania (type 3) | Serbia (type 1) | Serbia (type 3) | Slovakia (type 1) | Slovakia (type 3) | Slovenia | Ukraine (type 1)) | Ukraine (type 3))
India (Goa | Sikkim)
Indonesia (East Timor | Western New Guinea)
(All) Ireland (England | (Republic of) Ireland | Scotland)
(Republic of) Ireland (Northern Ireland)
Israel (Palestine (type 1) | Jordan) | Palestine (type 2))
Italy (Croatia | San Marino | Slovenia | Switzerland | Trieste)
Japan (Russia | South Korea)
Jordan (Palestine)
Korea (North Korea | South Korea)
Latvia (Estonia)
Lithuania (Russia)
Malaysia (Brunei | Cambodia | Malacca | Myanmar | Penang | Singapore (type 2)) | Singapore (type 4))
Maldives (India | Sri Lanka | Thailand)
Morocco (Ifni | Western Sahara)
Netherlands (Germany)
Netherlands Antilles (Aruba | Bonaire)
Pakistan (Bangladesh)
Philippines (Indonesia | Singapore)
Poland (Belarus | Hungary | Lithuania | Ukraine)
Portugal (Angola | Cape Verde | Guinea Bissau | Mozambique)
Reunion (Mayotte)
Romania (Bulgaria | Moldova | Ukraine)
Russia (Poland | Ukraine)
Saint-Martin (Sint Maarten)
Scotland (England)
Serbia and Montenegro (Kosovo | Montenegro | Serbia)
Singapore (Australia | Brunei | Cambodia | 'foreign teams' ('Africa', China, France, Japan, South Korea) | Hongkong | Indonesia | Laos | Malaysia | Myanmar | Philippines | Thailand)
Sint Maarten (Saint-Martin)
Slovenia (Croatia)
South Africa (Bophuthatswana | Ciskei | Namibia | Transkei | Venda)
Soviet Union (Armenia | Azerbaijan | Belarus | Estonia | Georgia | Kazakhstan | Kyrgyzstan | Latvia | Lithuania | Moldova | Russia | Tajikistan | Turkmenistan | Ukraine | Uzbekistan)
Spain (Andorra | Morocco)
Sudan (South Sudan)
Surinam (French Guyana)
Sweden (Finland)
Switzerland (Germany | Liechtenstein)
Syria (Egypt)
Tanzania (Zanzibar)
Thailand (Laos)
Turkey (Greece)
USA (Antigua | Bermuda | Canada | Puerto Rico)
Vietnam (North Vietnam | South Vietnam)
Wales (England)
Yemen (North Yemen | South Yemen)
Yugoslavia (Bosnia and Herzegovina | Croatia | Italy (Trieste) | Kosovo | Macedonia | Montenegro | Serbia | Slovenia)

Index by 'Guest' Country

NB: 'host' countries in alphabetical order between brackets.

Abkhazia (Georgia)
'Africa' (Singapore)
Algeria (France)
Andorra (Spain)
Angola (Portugal)
Antigua (Guyana | USA)
Armenia (Soviet Union)
Aruba (Netherlands Antilles)
Australia (Singapore)
Austria (Germany (type 1) | Germany (type 4) | Hungary)
Azerbaijan (Armenia | Soviet Union)
Bangladesh (Pakistan)
Barbados (Guyana)
Belarus (Poland | Soviet Union)
Belgium (Germany)
Bermuda (USA)
Bonaire (Netherlands Antilles)
Bophuthatswana (South Africa)
Bosnia and Herzegovina (Croatia | Yugoslavia)
Brunei (Malaysia | Singapore)
Bulgaria (Romania)
Cambodia (Malaysia | Singapore)
Canada (USA)
Cape Verde (Portugal)
Channel Islands (England)
China (Hongkong | Singapore)
Ciskei (South Africa)
Croatia (Hungary | Italy | Slovenia | Yugoslavia)
Cyprus (Greece)
Czech Republic (Austria | Czechoslovakia (1918-1938) | Czechoslovakia (1944-1993) | Germany (type 1) | Germany (type 4))
Denmark (Germany)
East Germany (Germany)
East Timor (Indonesia)
Egypt (Syria)
England ((All) Ireland | Scotland | Wales)
Eritrea (Ethiopia)
Estonia (Latvia | Soviet Union)
Finland (Sweden)
France (Germany (type 1) | Germany (type 3) | Singapore)
French Guyana (France | Surinam)
Georgia (Soviet Union)
Germany (Netherlands | Switzerland)
Goa (India)
Greece (Bulgaria | Turkey)
Guadeloupe (France)
Guinea Bissau (Portugal)
Hongkong (China | Singapore)
Hungary (Austria | Poland)
Ifni (Morocco)
India (Maldives)
Indonesia (Philippines | Singapore)
(Republic of) Ireland ((All) Ireland)
Italy (Austria | Yugoslavia)
Japan (Cambodia | Singapore)
Jordan (Israel)
Kazakhstan (Soviet Union)
Kosovo (Albania | Serbia (and Montenegro) | Yugoslavia)
Kyrgyzstan (Soviet Union)
Laos (Singapore | Thailand)
Latvia (Soviet Union)
Liechtenstein (Austria | Switzerland)
Lithuania (Germany | Poland | Soviet Union)
Luxembourg (Germany)
Macedonia (Bulgaria | Yugoslavia)
Malacca (Malaysia)
Malaysia (Australia | China | Singapore)
Martinique (France)
Mayotte (Comoros | France | Reunion)
Moldova (Romania | Soviet Union)
Monaco (France)
Montenegro (Serbia and Montenegro | Yugoslavia)
Morocco (France | Spain)
Mozambique (Portugal)
Myanmar (Malaysia | Singapore)
Namibia (South Africa)
New Caledonia (France)
New Zealand (Australia)
Northern Cyprus ((All) Cyprus)
Northern Ireland (England | (Republic of) Ireland)
North Korea (Korea)
North Vietnam (Vietnam)
North Yemen (Yemen)
Palestine (Chile | Egypt | Israel (type 1) | Israel (type 2) | Jordan)
Penang (Malaysia)
Philippines (China | Singapore)
Poland (Austria | Germany (type 1) | Germany (type 3) | Russia)
Puerto Rico (USA)
Reunion (France)
Romania (Hungary (type 1) | Hungary (type 3))
Russia (Finland (type 3) | Finland (type 4) | Germany | Japan | Lithuania | Soviet Union)
Saar (France | Germany)
Saint Lucia (Guyana)
Saint-Martin (Sint Maarten)
Saint Pierre et Miquelon (Canada)
San Marino (Italy)
Scotland (England | (All) Ireland)
Serbia (Croatia | Hungary (type 1) | Hungary (type 3) | Serbia and Montenegro | Yugoslavia)
Sikkim (India)
Singapore (Malaysia (type 2) | Malaysia (type 4) | Philippines)
Sint Maarten (Saint-Martin)
Slovakia (Czechoslovakia (1918-1938) | Czechoslovakia (1944-1993) | Germany | Hungary (type 1) | Hungary (type 3))
Slovenia (Austria | Germany | Hungary | Italy | Yugoslavia)
South Korea (Japan | Korea | Singapore)
South Ossetia (Georgia)
South Sudan (Sudan)
South Vietnam (Vietnam)
South Yemen (Yemen)
Spain (France)
Sri Lanka (Maldives)
Switzerland (Italy)
Tahiti (French Polynesia) (France)
Tajikistan (Soviet Union)
Thailand (China | Maldives | Singapore)
Tibet (China)
Transkei (South Africa)
Trieste (Italy | Yugoslavia)
Trinidad and Tobago (Guyana)
Tunisia (France)
Turkmenistan (Soviet Union)
Ukraine (Austria | Czechoslovakia | Germany | Hungary (type 1) | Hungary (type 3) | Poland | Romania | Russia | Soviet Union)
USA (Guyana)
Uzbekistan (Soviet Union)
Venda (South Africa)
Wales (England)
Western New Guinea (Indonesia)
Western Sahara (Morocco)
Zanzibar (Tanzania)

There also is a short discussion of some special cases in Africa (including brief mentions of Biafra, British Cameroon, Ruanda-Urundi and Somaliland), mostly dating back to colonial times:

French Northern Africa | French Western Africa | French Equatorial Africa | Italian East Africa | North and South Rhodesia, Nyasaland | Stanley Pool


Annexations and Occupations

Germany | Hungary | Bulgaria | Croatia | Croatia | Japan | South Africa | Morocco | Ethiopia | China | India | Indonesia | Israel | Jordan | Egypt | France | Portugal | Spain | Russia

Just before and during World War II, several countries, in particular Germany and Hungary, increased their territory dramatically, forcing clubs from other countries to enter their competitions. Some of these enjoyed great success - in particular Rapid Wien and Nagyváradi AC (known in Romanian as CA Oradea) who won league titles in the invading country. Also, Korean clubs were successful in Japan just before the second World War. Apart from shortlived war-time occupations, this section also includes various cases of annexations lasting for decades and a few colonial curiosities. Note that the extension of the Soviet Union by the three Baltic republics as part of the Hitler-Stalin pact is discussed under the disintegration of the Soviet Union, and the special case of Karelia under border moves.

Germany

Austria | Belgium | Czech Republic | France | Luxembourg | Poland | Slovakia | Slovenia | Ukraine

Starting with the 1938 Anschluß of Austria, clubs started entering the German championship and cup competitions from countries that had organised their own before. The other countries involved were the Czech Republic (first the Sudetenland, later also 'German' clubs (and army or air force selections) from the Protektorat Böhmen and Mähren, which also had its own league for the 'Czech' clubs), France (the Alsace and Lorraine regions, which had been German prior to World War I), Luxembourg and parts of Poland (including the area around Lwów which is now in the Ukraine; note that the regions which were part of the German Reich during the interbellum are discussed under 'moving borders').

Austrian clubs in the German football structure 1938-1944

After the 1938 Anschluß, the Austrian league was incorporated as Gauliga 17 (Ostmark) in the German football structure, which culminated in an annual, national championship playoff between the champions from the Gauligen. Only once did the Austrian representatives fail to reach the semifinals of the German championship, and even then (1944) the Austrian team lost to the eventual winners by the odd goal in five in the quarterfinals. Rapid won both the German championship and cup once, Vienna won one cup and reached the championship final, which Admira also managed once (suffering a record final defeat in the process).

Note that the Austrian football structure itself remained largely independent of the German one; only in the Vorarlberg/Bodensee region clubs from both sides of the current border played in one regional league (Bezirksklasse Bodensee-Vorarlberg, in which the German clubs VfB Friedsrichshafen, SV Weingarten, FC Wangen, FC Lindenberg, VfL Lindau, TSV Meckenbeuren, FV Ravensburg, FV Langenargen and TSG Friedrichshafen played against the Austrian clubs FC Lustenau, SV Feldkirch, TUS Dornbirn, FC Bregenz and FC Bludenz). In addition, some Czech, Slovak and Slovenian clubs played in Austrian regional leagues during the war; see the relevant notes in the sections on Czech clubs in the German football structure, Slovak clubs in the German football structure and Slovenian clubs in the German football structure.

Championship (Deutsche Meisterschaft)

1939: finalists: Admira Wien             (0-9 vs Schalke 04)
1940: semifinal: Rapid Wien              (1-2 aet vs Dresdner SC; Rapid
                                          won playoff for 3rd place vs
                                          Waldhof Mannheim (4-4 aet, 5-2))
1941: winners:   Rapid Wien              (4-3 vs Schalke 04)
1942: finalists: Vienna                  (0-2 vs Schalke 04)
1943: semifinal: Vienna                  (1-2 vs FV Saarbrücken; Vienna 
                                          lost playoff for 3rd place vs
                                          Holstein Kiel (1-4))
1944: quarterf.: Vienna                  (2-3 vs Dresdner SC)

Cup (von-Tschammer-Pokal)

1938: winners:   Rapid Wien              (3-1 vs FSV Frankfurt)
      semifinal: Wiener Sport-Club       (2-3 vs FSV Frankfurt)
      quarterf.: Vienna                  (1-3 vs 1.FC Nürnberg)
                 Grazer SC               (1-6 vs Wiener Sport-Club)
      1/8 final: Admira Wien             (0-6 vs Vienna)
                 Austro-Fiat Wien        (1-5 vs Rapid Wien)
                 Austria Wien            (2-3 vs Grazer SC)
                 Wacker Wien             (0-1 vs Wiener Sport-Club)
NB: the German and Austrian teams had played separately until the
    quarterfinals, for which 4 teams from both areas qualified.
1939: semifinal: Rapid Wien              (0-1 vs 1.FC Nürnberg)
                 Wacker Wien             (1-1 aet, 2-2 aet, 0-0 aet, lost on
                                          draw vs Waldhof Mannheim)
1940: semifinal: Rapid Wien              (0-3 vs Dresdner SC)
      quarterf.: Wiener Sport-Club       (1-2 vs Fortuna Düsseldorf)
      1/8 final: Wacker Wien             (1-5 vs Wiener Sport-Club)
1941: semifinal: Admira Wien             (2-4 vs Dresdner SC)
      quarterf.: Austria Wien            (1-4 vs Schalke 04)
      1/16 fin.: Rapid Wien              (3-5 vs Admira Wien)
1942: 1/16 fin.: Vienna                  (0-4 vs NSTG Falkenau)
1943: winners:   Vienna                  (3-2 vs LSV Groß Hamburg)
Belgian clubs in the German football structure 1940-1944

The eastern Belgian region around Eupen and Malmedy (where German is spoken) was annexed by Germany during the second World War. Nothing is known about participations by the existing local clubs (such as FC Eupen, founded 1920, and La Jeunesse d'Eupen, founded 1919 as Verein für Jugend und Volksspiele Eupen as a merger between two older clubs (FC Fortuna Eupen and Eupener Ballspielverein, both founded 1908) and renamed to the French version of their name in 1920) in the German league structure during the war.

Championship  

No data available.

Cup  

No data available.

Czech clubs in the German football structure 1938-1944

The Sudetenland was incorporated in the German Reich on Sep 29, 1938. From the 1940/41 season on, also clubs from the Protektorat Böhmen und Mähren, roughly corresponding to the remainder (apart from the Sudetenland) of the current Czech Republic, entered the German league structure. Note that nearly all clubs listed below were either army (Militär SV) or air force (LSV = Luftwaffen Sportverein) teams or artificial sports units (NSTG = Nationalsozialistische Turngemeinde) enforced by the nazis; only Warnsdorfer FK existed as a club prior to the German takeover (they were forcibly merged into NSTG Warnsdorf in 1939/40 and relegated from the top level of the Sportbereich 18 Sudetenland as reigning champions).

Most of the clubs listed below played in a separate regional league for the Sudetenland, but some clubs based in the current Czech Republic entered regional leagues of current Austria during World War II: NSTG Budweis won the highest league of Oberösterreich (then called Oberdonauer 1. Klasse) in 1941/42; Militär SV Brünn reached the semifinals of the regional league of Niederösterreich (then known as Niederdonau) in the same season; and in 1943/44 and 1944/45, RSG Lundenburg played in the regional league of Niederdonau, finishing third in their first season; in 1944/45, their local rivals TuS Lundenburg also played in that league, as did SC Engerau from a suburb of Bratislava, now the capital of Slovakia.

Note that DFC Prag played in the German championship 1902/03.

City name correspondences: 
German           Czech
Brünn            Brno
Brüx             Most
Budweis          České Budějovice
Falkenau         Sokolov
Graslitz         Kraslice
Lundenburg       Břeclav
Olmütz           Olomouc
Prag             Praha
Warnsdorf        Varnsdorf
Witkowitz        Vítkovice

Championship (Deutsche Meisterschaft)

The following clubs from the current Czech Republic played in the
Endrunde of the German championship.

1939: group st.: Warnsdorfer FK          (4  0 0 4  5-16  0)
1940: group st.: NSTG Graslitz           (4  0 1 3  7-22  1)
1941: group st.: NSTG Prag               (4  0 1 3  3- 8  1)
1942: qual. rd.: LSV Olmütz              (0-1 vs Vienna)
1943: prel. rd.: Militär SV Brünn        (2-5 vs Vienna)
1944: qual. rd.: Militär SV Brünn        (3-6 vs Vienna)
      qual. rd.: NSTG Brüx               (0-8 vs 1.FC Nürnberg)
      
Cup (von-Tschammer-Pokal)

1940: 1/16 fin.: NSTG Witkowitz          (1-9 vs Wiener Sport-Club)
1942: 1/8 final: NSTG Falkenau           (1-4 vs Blau-Weiß Berlin)
1943: 1/8 final: Militär SV Brünn        (1-5 vs 1.FC Nürnberg)
      1/16 fin.: NSTG Brüx               (0-14 vs Vienna)
French clubs in the German football structure 1940-1944

During the war, Germany occupied the French regions Elsaß (Alsace) and Lothringen (Lorraine), which were under dispute between the two countries (or rather cultural entities, as Germany as a state is a more recent invention) for centuries (clubs from the areas played in (southern) Germany prior to the first World War). Alsatian clubs obtained their own Gauliga, while those from Lorraine (FV Metz, TSG Saargemünd and TSG Merlenbach) were included in the Westmark with teams from the Saar and Rheinland-Pfalz. FV Metz were runners-up in the Westmark each of the three seasons they played (1941/42, 1942/43 and 1943/44) but never qualified for the Endrunde. All clubs involved played before in the French league structure, though of course under different names, e.g. FV Metz as FC Metz, FC Mülhausen 93 as FC Mulhouse and SG SS Straßburg as SC Red Star de Strasbourg (not to be confused with their better known town rivals RC Strasbourg, who were known as Rasen SC Straßburg during German occupation).

City name correspondences: 
German           French
Merlenbach       Merlebach
Metz             Metz
Mülhausen        Mulhouse
Saargemünd       Sarreguemines
Straßburg        Strasbourg

Championship (Deutsche Meisterschaft)

The following clubs from current France played in the Endrunde of 
the German championship.

1941: group st.: FC Mülhausen 93         (6  0 1 5  9-28  1)
1942: quarterf.: SG SS Straßburg         (0-6 vs Schalke 04)
1943: prel. rd.: FC Mülhausen 93         (1-5 vs FV Saarbrücken)
1944: 1/8 final: FC Mülhausen 93         (3-5 vs KSV FV/Altenkessel Saarbrücken)

NB: FV Saarbrücken was the contemporary name of current 1.FC Saarbrücken;
    they entered into a 'war-time union' with Altenkessel in 1943/44.

Cup (von-Tschammer-Pokal)
 
1941: 1/8 final: FV Metz                 (0-3 vs 1.SV Jena)
      1/16 fin.: FC Mülhausen 93         (0-4 vs Stuttgarter Kickers)
1942: 1/8 final: SG SS Straßburg         (1-15 vs 1860 München)
      1/16 fin.: FC Mülhausen 93         (0-2 vs VfB Stuttgart)
1943: 1/16 fin.: FC Mülhausen 93         (1-4 vs VfR Mannheim)
Luxembourg clubs in the German football structure 1940-1944

Football clubs from Luxembourg were incorporated in the Bezirksklasse Gruppe West within the Sportbereich Moselland. In the first season teams from the Grand Duchy entered, 1941/42, FV Stadt Düdelingen won this league and then triumphed in a playoff against the winners of the Bezirksklasse Gruppe Ost (Eintracht Kreuznach), earning entry to the qualifying round of the German championship. One year later, in 1942/43, FK Niederkorn won the same group but lost the final of the Moselland championship 4-5 on aggregate against TuS Neuendorf (after winning the first leg 3-0). In 1943/44, Schwarz-Weiß Esch were the winners of the western group and played the Moselland final, but after winning 4-1 at home they were destroyed 0-8 by TuS Neuendorf in the second leg in Koblenz.
So FV Stadt Düdelingen are the only club from current Luxembourg to have played in the Endrunde of the German championship; they also reached the cup quarterfinals once during the war.

All clubs involved played before in the Luxembourg league structure, though of course under different names, e.g. FV Stadt Düdelingen as Stade Dudelange, Schwarz-Weiß Esch as Jeunesse d'Esch and FK Niederkorn as Progrès Niedercorn. Other renamed Luxembourg clubs to play at the highest German league level during this time were Moselland Luxemburg (Spora Luxembourg), SV Düdelingen (US Dudelange) and Schwarz-Weiß Wasserbillig (Jeunesse Wasserbillig, who did not reach the highest level in their home country until 1958 but played in the 1943/44 Bezirksklasse Gruppe West of the Sportbereich Moselland).

City name correspondences: 
German           French           Luxembourgish
Düdelingen       Dudelange        Diddeléng
Esch             Esch             Esch
Luxemburg        Luxembourg       Lëtzebuerg
Niederkorn       Niedercorn       Nidderkuer
Wasserbillig     Wasserbillig     Waasserbëlleg

Championship (Deutsche Meisterschaft)

1942: qual. rd.: FV Stadt Düdelingen     (0-2 vs Schalke 04)

Cup (von-Tschammer-Pokal)

1942: quarterf.: FV Stadt Düdelingen     (0-7 vs 1860 München)
1943: 1/16 fin.: FK Niederkorn           (0-3 vs Spfr. Katernberg)
Polish clubs in the German football structure 1940-1944

This section only refers to the areas of (current) Poland which were not part of the German Reich prior to World War II; a great part of current Poland, in particularly on the northern coast (Pommern) and the southwestern mining area (Schlesien) was part of Germany long before World War II (and Poland stretched far further east - see the section on Moving Countries). Likewise, clubs from Westpreußen (e.g. from Elbing/Elbląg), the Freistaat Danzig (an autonomous entity consisting of the harbour city Danzig/Gdańsk with its suburbs such as Neufahrwasser/Nowy Port) and Ostpreußen (with as major city Königsberg/Kaliningrad, nowadays part of Russia) entered the German football championship as a matter of course since the beginning of the twentieth century.
The relevant areas were incorporated as Warthegau (with as main cities Posen (which had belonged to Germany before the first World War but had fallen to Poland afterwards) and Litzmannstadt) and Generalgouvernement (with as main cities Warschau, Krakau, Lemberg (currently Lviv in the Ukraine), Radom and Lublin).

Note that like in the Czech case, most clubs listed below were either army or air force units or German police teams (OrPo = Ordnungspolizei); DWM denoted Deutsche Waffen- und Munitionsfabriken.

City name correspondences: 
German           Polish
Krakau           Kraków
Litzmannstadt    Łódź
Posen            Poznań
Warschau         Warszawa

Championship (Deutsche Meisterschaft)

1941: qual. rd.: LSV Posen               (2-2 vs Preußen Danzig, lost on draw)
1942: prel. rd.: OrPo Litzmannstadt      (1-8 vs VfB Königsberg)
      qual. rd.: LSV Boelecke Krakau     (2-5 vs Planitzer SC)
1943: 1/8 final: OrPo Warschau           (1-5 vs VfB Königsberg)
      prel. rd.: BSG DWM Posen           (1-3 vs OrPo Warschau)
1944: qual. rd.: LSV Mölders Krakau      (1-4 vs VfB Königsberg)
      qual. rd.: BSG DWM Posen           (0-7 vs STC Hirschberg)

Cup (von-Tschammer-Pokal)

1943: 1/16 fin.: Praga Warschau          (3-5 vs Militär SV Brünn)
      1/16 fin.: BSG DWM Posen           (0-4 vs VfB Königsberg)
Slovak clubs in the German football structure 1940-1945

In 1944/45, SC Engerau played in the Gauklasse Süd of the regional league of Niederdonau, finishing fifth and last. In the northern section of the same regional league, two clubs from Lundenburg (now Břeclav in the Czech Republic) participated. Before the war, Engerau had been known as Ligeti SC, an ethnic Hungarian club founded in 1899 in the Bratislava suburb of Petržalka; as such they had twice entered the Czechoslovak amateur championship, in 1925 and 1931, as champions of the ethnic Hungarian federation in Slovakia, the Slovenska MLSz; the club was dissolved in 1945.

City name correspondences: 
German           Slovak           Hungarian
Engerau          Petržalka        Ligetfalu (later Pozsonyligetfalu)

Slovenian clubs in the German football structure 1940-1944

In the 1943/44 season, three clubs from current Slovenia played in the southern group of the Gauliga Steiermark together with three clubs from current Austria. Trifail (most probably the same as NK Rudar Trbovlje, founded 1921) finished equal on points with winners BSG Rosental, who progressed to the Styrian final against northern group winners Reichsbahn SG Graz thanks to a better goal average. The two clubs from Maribor, SV Rapid and BSG Reichsbahn (probably identical to NK Železničar Maribor, founded 1927) finished third and fourth in the southern group.
In addition, clubs from Aßling (Turn- und Sportgemeinschaft Aßling), Krainburg (SK Krainburg), Veldes and Cilli entered the Carinthian league structure during one or more war seasons.

City name correspondences: 
German           Slovenian
Aßling           Jesenice
Cilli            Celje
Krainburg        Kranj
Marburg          Maribor
Trifail          Trbovlje
Veldes           Bled
Ukrainian clubs in the German football structure 1940-1944

During World War II, the region around L'viv (Lemberg, Lwów), which had been Polish during the interbellum but became part of the Soviet Union after the war, was incorporated in the Generalgouvernement. Next to nothing is known about the regional championship of Galizien played between German army teams; in the 1942/43 season, Ostbahn SG Lemberg were leading the league around Christmas with 7 points from 4 matches, ahead of DTSG Lemberg and W.H.-Nachrichten (both 4 points from 3 matches). Independently of that, a West Ukrainian championship was apparently played on 3 occasions, with as champions Ukraina (Lviv) in 1942, Skala (Stryj) in 1943 and Vatra (Drohobych) in 1944.

Hungary

Croatia | Romania | Serbia | Slovakia | Slovenia | Ukraine

During the second World War, Hungary annexed a number of regions which had belonged to Hungary (as part of the Habsburg Empire) prior to the first World War.

The first team from outside the current borders of Hungary to enter the Hungarian first division was Kassai AC (from Košice/Kassa in Slovakia). Afterwards, various clubs from areas now in Romania or Serbia entered; these areas had large Hungarian minorities and most of the clubs involved presumably had a sizable quantity of ethnically Hungarian players. Most successful were the clubs from Transylvania: Nagyváradi AC (from Oradea/Nagyvárad, close to the Hungarian border) won the Hungarian championship 1943/44 (as the first team from outside Budapest to do so), 13 points clear of Ferencváros and Kolozsvári AC (from Cluj/Kolozsvár), who reached the cup final in the same season. Below all 'foreign' clubs to play in the first Hungarian league division are listed.

Croatian clubs in the Hungarian football structure 1939-1944

In the 1941/42 season, Csáktornyai SC from the currently Croatian city of Čakovec played in the southern Trans-Danubian group (Dél-Dunántúl) of the third Hungarian league level (NB III), finishing 5th. No further records of their participation (or that of any other club from towns in current Croatia) in the Hungarian league structure during the second World War are available.
During the interbellum the same club (known as Čakovečki ŠK) had entered the Slovenian regional league in the Kingdom of Yugoslavia, winning it in 1937/38 but missing out on promotion to the Yugoslav top level.

City name correspondence: 
Hungarian        Croatian
Csáktornya       Čakovec

Romanian clubs in the Hungarian football structure 1939-1944

Nagyváradi AC (from Oradea/Nagyvárad, close to the Hungarian border) won the Hungarian championship 1943/44 (as the first team from outside Budapest to do so), 13 points clear of Ferencváros and Kolozsvári AC (from Cluj/Kolozsvár), who reached the cup final in the same season. Both clubs had been promoted in 1940/41, Kolozsvári AC as winners of the Erdély (Transylvania) group of the Hungarian second division, and Nagyváradi AC as its champions - NAC had not entered the second division but was recognised as the strongest club from Erdély.
In addition, we mention that Nagybányai SE played at the second Hungarian league level in all seasons from 1940/41 to 1943/44, with their best season being the last one when they were runners-up in the eastern group of the second division, missing out on promotion against Szentlőrinci AC; they had also been runners-up in the Mátyás group in 1942/43. A number of other Transylvanian clubs played one or more seasons at the second level of the Hungarian league structure during this period, including other clubs from Nagyvárad (Nagyváradi Törekvés, at the second level from 1940/41 to 1942/43) and Kolozsvár (Kolozsvári Bástya SE, at the second level between 1940/41 and 1943/44; Kolozsvári MÁV, at the second level from 1941/42 to 1943/44, finishing third in the Mátyás group in the first two of these seasons; and Kolozsvári EAC, playing at the second level in 1941/42 and 1943/44) as well as clubs from Szatmárnémeti (Szatmárnémeti SE, also known as Szatmári SE, at the second level in 1940/41 and 1941/42) and Marosvásárhely (Marosvásárhelyi SE from 1941/42 to 1943/44, finishing fourth in the Mátyás group in 1942/43; Székelyföldi MÁV, playing at the second level in 1942/43 and 1943/44, twice finishing fifth in their group; Marosvásárhelyi NMKTE, playing at the second level in 1942/43 and 1943/44; and Marosvásárhelyi Attila, who only played at the second level in 1943/44).

City name correspondences: 
Hungarian        Romanian
Kolozsvár        Cluj (Cluj-Napoca)
Marosvásárhely   Târgu Mureş
Nagybánya        Baia Mare
Nagyvárad        Oradea
Szatmárnémeti    Satu Mare

Championship (1st division)

1941/42  5.Nagyváradi AC           30 14  8  8  81-52  36
        13.Kolozsvári AC           30  8  6 16  51-78  22
1942/43  2.Nagyváradi AC           30 19  4  7  85-49  42
        10.Kolozsvári AC           30 11  4 15  60-70  26
1943/44  1.Nagyváradi AC           30 24  1  5  78-36  49
         3.Kolozsvári AC           30 15  6  9  54-45  36
1944/45  2.Nagyváradi AC            3  2  1  0   6- 3   5 
         6.Kolozsvári AC            3  1  2  0   5- 3   4 
NB: the 1944/45 season was abandoned after a few rounds and replaced
    by an (unofficial) Budapest competition in the fall of 1944.

Cup

1944: finalists: Kolozsvári AC           (2-2, 1-3 vs Ferencváros)
Nagyváradi AC (Nagyváradi Atlétikai Club) were founded in 1910. After Transylvania came to Romania (from the Hungarian part of the Habsburg Empire) after the first World War, they were renamed as CA Oradea (Clubul Atletic Oradea). Prior to World War II, the club played at the Romanian top level for six seasons (1932/33 to 1937/38), finishing runners-up in 1934/35. During the last two seasons before World War II, they were at the second level. After the war, the club was renamed Libertatea and joined the top flight in the 1946/47 season (the first official championship in Romania after the war); in 1948 the club was renamed IC Oradea, and as such won the Romanian championship 1948/49, making them one of the few clubs to have won league titles in two currently existing countries.
However, the club itself no more exists. After another name change to Progresul (under which name they still finished third in 1951) the club were relegated in 1954; they bounced back after just one season at the second level (in which they reached the 1955 cup final, losing 3-6 aet vs CCA, the later Steaua Bucureşti) and celebrated their new top flight status by winning the 1955/56 national cup (2-0 vs Energia Metalul Cîmpia Turzii). They were renamed CS Oradea before the 1957/58 season and relegated as such in 1958. After another name change, to CSM Crişana Oradea, they gained promotion back to the top flight in 1962, but were relegated after just one season, while local rivals Crişul (who later became FC Bihor Oradea) were promoted in that same 1962/63 season. Rather than playing at the second level again, Crişana were dissolved.

Kolozsvári AC (Kolozsvári Atlétikai Club) played as CA Cluj (Clubul Atletic Cluj) in the Romanian second division 1934/35 and 1935/36. They lost their second level status following the reduction of the division from six to two regional groups, and played at regional level until World War II. After their success within the Hungarian league structure during the war, they were included in the Romanian top flight 1946/47 under the name Ferar Cluj. As such, they finished 6th in 1946/47 and 9th in 1947/48 before merging into CFR Cluj (the local railway team), who had withdrawn from their second level group halfway through the 1947/48 season. The merger club was named CFR Cluj and took Ferar's place in the top flight but the identity of the railway club. This club won a first ever Romanian league championship as CFR Cluj-Napoca in 2007/08; two more titles followed in 2009/10 and 2011/12, as well as three consecutive Romanian cups in 2007/08, 2008/09 and 2009/10.

Note that another club from Cluj, Universitatea Cluj, moved to Sibiu in 1940, following the Vienna Dictate that transferred a sizable portion of Transylvania including Cluj and Oradea to Hungary. Having finished second in one of the four second level groups (behind Crişana Oradea) in 1939/40, the club entered the Romanian first level as Universitatea Sibiu in 1940/41. Under that name they reached the 1941/42 Romanian cup final (which they lost 1-7 to Rapid Bucureşti; they had earlier lost the 1933/34 final to Ripensia Timişoara as Universitatea Cluj and later, after moving back to Cluj in 1945, played two more finals under different names again, losing the 1948/49 final as CSU Cluj to CSCA Bucureşti (later Steaua) and finally winning the trophy in 1964/65 as Ştiinţa Cluj, beating Dinamo Piteşti (later Argeş) in the final).
See also the notes on clubs from the region in the Hungarian football structure during the Habsburg Empire, such as Temesvári Kinizsi, who won regional championships in Hungary during the first World War and then claimed six consecutive national championships (as Chinezul Timişoara) in Romania from 1921/22 to 1926/27 after the region became Romanian.

Serbian clubs in the Hungarian football structure 1939-1944
City name correspondences: 
Hungarian        Serbian
Apatin           Apatin
Bezdán           Bezdan
Kúla             Kula
Óbecse           Bečej
Szabadka         Subotica
Topolya          Bačka Topola
Újvidek          Novi Sad
Verbász          Vrbas
Zenta            Senta
Zombor           Sombor

Championship (1st division)

1941/42 13.Újvideki AC             30 10  5 15  47-86  25
1942/43 11.Újvideki AC             30 10  6 14  52-63  26
1943/44  6.Újvideki AC             30 12  7 11  68-58  31
1944/45 12.Újvideki AC              2  1  0  1   3- 9   2 
NB: the 1944/45 season was abandoned after a few rounds and replaced
    by an (unofficial) Budapest competition in the fall of 1944.
Novi Sad lies in the Vojvodina, an autonomous province in Serbia with a considerable Hungarian population (but also other ethnic minorities). Újvideki AC were founded in 1910; its home town Novi Sad/Újvidek came to Yugoslavia (from the Habsburg Empire) in 1918, and the club were renamed Novisadski AK; as such they reached the semifinals of the 1935/36 championship (played in knock-out format), which they lost 0-1 to Slavija Sarajevo. The club was dissolved in 1944. Apart from Újvideki AC, many clubs from smaller towns currently in Serbia played at the second or third Hungarian league level. These included Szabadkai VAK (at the second level from 1941/42 to 1943/44, finishing fourth in the Zrínyi group in 1942/43 and again in the southern group in 1943/44), Óbecsei Bocskai (at the second level in 1942/43 and 1943/44, finishing sixth in the Zrínyi group in 1942/43), Topolyai SE (at the second level in 1942/43 and 1943/44, finishing seventh in the Zrínyi group in 1942/43), Újverbászi CSE (from Verbász; at the second level from 1941/42 to 1943/44, their best finish ninth in the Zrínyi group in 1942/43), Zentai AK (at the second level from 1941/41 to 1943/44, their best finish ninth in the southern group in 1943/44), as well as Bezdáni SE and Szabadkai SC, both relegated after one season at the second level in 1941/42; in addition the following clubs played at the third level in the 1941/42 season: Apatini SE, Kúlai AFC, Bácska Szabadkai AC, Újvidéki Vasutas AK and Zombori SE.
See also the notes on clubs from the region in the
Hungarian football structure during the Habsburg Empire.

Slovak clubs in the Hungarian football structure 1939-1944
City name correspondences: 
Hungarian        Slovak           German
Érsekújvár       Nové Zámky       Neuhäusl
Kassa            Košice           Kaschau
Losonc           Lučenec          Lizenz
Losoncapátfalva  Opatová (now part of Lučenec)
Pozsóny          Bratislava       Preßburg

Championship (1st division)

1939/40 13.Kassai AC               26  5  3 18  29-79  13
Kassai AC (Kassai Atlétikai Club) were founded in 1903; in the 1920s they played in the MLSz (Hungarian) championship in Slovakia (there were three separate federations in Slovakia alone, and more in Bohemia and Moravia), reaching the MLSz Slovak championship final in 1927 (lost 2-4 vs Rapid Bratislava) and 1928/29 (lost 1-2 to Ligeti SC, also from Bratislava).
They joined the eastern section of the Slovak-Lower Carpatian division in 1934/35, one of six second level leagues in Czechoslovakia at the time (the 1935/36 winners, Rusj Užhorod, from a town now in the Ukraine, managed promotion to the top level state league, Státní Liga). After twice finishing third and once second, KAC won this division in 1937/38, but finished sixth and last in the promotion tournament (from which two clubs qualified to the Státní Liga 1938/39).
Slovak football separated at the end of 1938 and set up its own league in 1939, but this did not cover all of current Slovakia: no teams from Košice/Kassa (or other towns close to the Hungarian border such as Komárno/Komárom, Nové Zámky/Érsekújvár or Lučenec/Losonc) ever joined it, as Hungary annexed the area in 1938. After their relegation from the Hungarian top flight 1939/40, KAC reappeared as Kassai Rákóczi AC at the Hungarian second level from 1941/42 to 1943/44, finishing third in the Rákóczi group in 1942/43. Other clubs from current Slovakia to play at the Hungarian second level during the second World War were Losonci AFC (at the second level from 1941/42 to 1943/44, finishing runners-up in the northern group in the 1943/44 season), Érsekújvári SE (at the second level from 1941/42 to 1943/44, finishing third in the Széchenyi group in 1942/43), Losoncapátfalvai TSE (who were sixth in the Matra group in their only second level season 1941/42) and Kassai VSC, who finished eleventh in the Rákóczi group in their only second level season 1942/43, but may be a disguise for Železničiari Košice, a club founded in 1920 which finished third in the second level Východoslovenská župa of the Czechoslovak league structure in 1923 and later evolved into FK Lokomotíva Košice.
Kassai (Rákóczi) AC did not reappear after the war; the only Košice club to be included in the Czechoslovak top flight 1945/46 (and the first ever to reach that level) were newly founded ŠK Jednota Košice, and at the second level we only find ŠK Sparta Košice, who merged with Železničiari Košice at the end of that season; this merger club also 'swallowed' ŠK Jednota (meanwhile renamed Dynamo) in 1949 and eventually became FK Lokomotíva Košice. See the remarks on Kassai VSC in the previous paragraph.
See also the notes on clubs from the region in the Hungarian football structure during the Habsburg Empire.

Slovenian clubs in the Hungarian football structure 1939-1944

The region of Prekmurje (Muravidék), with as main towns Lendava and Murska Sobota, was occupied by Hungary from 1941 to 1944 (and by Germany during the last year of the war). It appears a club from Lendava, probably identical to or related to current Nafta Lendava, played in a regional Hungarian league also involving clubs from Szombathely, finishing second in their group in 1942. It is not known whether any club from Murska Sobota, whether related to later Slovenian top flight club and 1994/95 cup winners Mura (founded 1924, renamed Mura 05 in 2005) or not, entered the Hungarian football structure. After World War II, the region became part of Yugoslavia.

City name correspondences: 
Hungarian        Slovenian
Lendva           Lendava
Muraszombat      Murska Sobota
Ukrainian clubs in the Hungarian football structure 1939-1944

During the second World War, Hungary also annexed Carpathian Ruthenia (Transcarpathia, Kárpátalja), which during the interbellum had belonged to the Slovak part of Czechoslovakia, and went to the Soviet Union (more precisely, the Ukrainian Socialist Soviet Republic) afterwards. From this region, two clubs from the main city Ungvár, namely Ungvári AC and SK Rusj Ungvár (also listed as Ungvári Rusznyi and in either form the Hungarian version of Rusj Užhorod) played at the second level of the Hungarian league structure. Ungvári AC won promotion to the top level in 1943/44, as winners of the northern group of the second division ahead of Salgótarjáni SE, but their debut season was abandoned after a few rounds in the fall of 1944, with UAC in last position after suffering three losses. The national championship was then replaced by an (unofficial) Budapest league.
Other clubs from the town have played at the top level of the Czechoslovak (Rusj Užhorod) and Ukrainian (Zakarpattya Uzhhorod) league structures.
Two other towns from the region were represented at the second level in Hungary as well: Beregszászi FTC finished 15th from 16 clubs in the NB II Felvidéki csoport (a regional second division group) in 1939/40 and disappeared to the third Hungarian level for the seasons 1940/41 to 1942/43, while Munkácsi LSE finished twelfth in the northern group in their only second level season 1943/44. Both Beregszász and Munkács had clubs playing at the second level in Czechoslovakia before the second World War. In the first northern group of the third level NB III 1940/41 we also find clubs from other towns in the region: Aknaszlatinai BTE, Nagyszőllősi Beszkid and Várpalánkai Turul SE.
See also the notes on clubs from the region in the Hungarian football structure during the Habsburg Empire.

City name correspondences: 
Hungarian        Ukrainian        Slovak           Russian          Romanian
Aknaszlatina     Solotvyno        Slatinské Doly   Solotvina        Ocna Slatina
Beregszász       Berehowe         Berehovo         Beregowo         Bereg
Munkács          Mukacheve        Mukačevo         Mukachyovo       Muncaci
Nagyszőlős       Vynohradiv       Veľká Sevľuš     Vinogradov       Seleuşu Mare
Ungvár           Uzhhorod         Užhorod          Uzhgorod         Ujhorod
Várpalánka       Palanok (now part of Mukacheve)

Championship (1st division)

1944/45 16.Ungvári AC               3  0  0  3   3-13   0 
NB: the 1944/45 season was abandoned after a few rounds and replaced
    by an (unofficial) Budapest competition in the fall of 1944.

Bulgaria

Greece | Macedonia

After entering World War II at the side of the axis, Bulgaria occupied parts of northern Greece and southern Yugoslavia. No league championship was organised in Bulgaria during the war, but several clubs from the occupied areas reached the latter stages of the knock-out style national championship or of the Tzar's Cup.

Greek clubs in the Bulgarian football structure 1941-1943
Championship (knock-out style)

1943: 2nd round: Belomorets Kavala       (2-1, 0-1, 1-2 vs Botev Plovdiv)

NB: is is unknown whether this club (whose name translates to 'White
    Sea', referring to the Aegean) is related to the Kavala clubs 
    (in particular AÉ Kaválas and Fílippoi Kaválas, which together
    with Iraklís Kavála merged into AÓ Kaválas in 1965) playing in 
    the northern section of the Greek championship prior to 1940.
Macedonian clubs in the Bulgarian football structure 1941-1943

All clubs below are from towns in the current state of Macedonia, an area on which Bulgaria have historically laid claims. Note that Macedonia also is the name for a large part of Northern Greece. Makedonija Skopje once reached the championship final and also the semifinal of the Tzar's Cup; they are one of the ancestors of current Vardar Skopje.

Championship (knock-out style)

1942: finalists: Makedonija Skopje       (0-2, 0-1 vs Levski Sofia)
      1/6 final: Makedonija Bitola       (0-1 vs Slavia Sofia)
      1/6 final: ŽSK Skopje              (0-3 vs ŽSK Sofia)
      1/12 fin.: Vardar Skopje           (1-4 vs Makedonija Bitola)
      1/12 fin.: Goce Delcev Prilep      (0-8 vs ŽSK Skopje)
1943: 2nd round: ŽSK Skopje              (1-3, 1-2 vs Levski Plovdiv)
      1st round: Makedonija Bitola       (0-1, 0-2 vs ŽSK Skopje)

Tzar's Cup

1941: semifinal: Makedonija Skopje       (0-1 vs Napreduk Ruse)
1942: quarterf.: Makedonija Bitola       (0-3 vs SK Plovdiv)
      1st round: ŽSK Skopje              (1-2 vs Makedonija Bitola)

NB: Goce Delcev were founded 1941 and renamed Pobeda Prilep in 1950;
    as such they won the 2003/04 Macedonian championship and 2001/02
    Macedonian cup, also losing the 1999/00 cup final;
    Makedonija Bitola are apparently not related to current Pelister;
    Makedonija Skopje merged 1947 with Pobeda Skopje into Vardar Skopje
    (see the section on Macedonian clubs in Yugoslavia); therefore,
    neither the Makedonija Skopje nor the Vardar Skopje teams above are
    related to the current clubs of those names, but the war-time
    Makedonija Skopje is part of the genealogical tree of current Vardar;
    it is unknown whether the railway club ŽSK (Željezničarski SK) 
    Skopje is related to any current club.

Croatia

Bosnia and Herzegovina | Serbia

During the second World War, Germany, Hungary and Italy dismembered Yugoslavia, and created the 'independent' vassal state of Croatia, which also comprised current Bosnia-Herzegovina and some parts of current Serbia. During the war, football competitions were organised in this state, leading to the participation of many clubs based in Bosnia-Herzegovina and some from Zemun and Subotica. These are summarised below. See also the section on Yugoslavia.

Bosnian and Herzegovinan clubs in the Croatian football structure

The seasons 1940/41 and 1941 were played in a league format; the 1941 season was abandoned at the half-way stage. All later seasons had regional or city leagues from which clubs emerged to a knock-out tournament for the title (the 1943 season had a 4-team league as final stage). The most successful club from current Bosnia and Herzegovina was SAŠK Sarajevo, who reached the Croatian championship final in 1942.

Among the clubs listed here, SAŠK Sarajevo had previously played in the Yugoslav championship; they seem to have been dissolved after the war. Zrinjski Mostar have won the 2004/05 championship of Bosnia-Herzegovina, but it is unknown if and how this club are related to that of 1941. None of the mentioned clubs from Banja Luka appear to be related to either Borac Banja Luka or Krajišnik (dissolved 1945) who played in the Yugoslav championship. Likewise, Đerdelez Sarajevo appear unrelated to any later Sarajevo club that featured in Yugoslavia or independent Bosnia-Herzegovina, and Tomislav Zenica are not identical to Čelik Zenica.

SAŠK Sarajevo
1940/41  7.SAŠK Sarajevo           18  5  3 10  17-44  13
1941     9.SAŠK Sarajevo            8  0  0  8   0-30   0
NB: season abandoned
1942: semifinal: SAŠK Sarajevo           (1-2, 1-9 vs Concordia Zagreb)
1943: quarterf.: SAŠK Sarajevo           (0-0, 0-3awd vs Concordia Zagreb)
1944: finalists: SAŠK Sarajevo           (final vs HAŠK Zagreb not played)

Zrinjski Mostar  
1941     4.Zrinjski Mostar          8  4  1  3  16-19   9
NB: season abandoned

Incomplete lists of Bosnian and Herzegovinan participants at group 
stage who did not reach the knock-out stage (unlike SAŠK Sarajevo):
1942: Zrinjski Mostar, Hrvoje Banja Luka, HBSK Banja Luka,
      Đerdelez Sarajevo
1943: Hrvoje Banja Luka, HBSK Banja Luka, Đerdelez Sarajevo, 
      Tomislav Zenica
1944: HBSK Banja Luka, Zvonimir Banja Luka, Hrvoje Banja Luka,
      Hajduk Sarajevo, Đerdelez Sarajevo, Tomislav Zenica
Serbian clubs in the Croatian football structure

Bačka Subotica (founded 1901 under the Hungarian name of Bacska Szabadkai Athletikai Club) were dissolved in 1945, after playing at the third league level in Hungary since 1941. In 1950, a new club called Bačka Subotica was formed out of a merger between a number of local clubs. Neither version of the club has won any honours in Serbia (or Yugoslavia). Nothing is known about the fate of the Zemun clubs after World War II (they did not play a significant role in Yugoslavia before the war, though a club called Sparta Zemun played in the 1938/39 league); presumably they were all dissolved. Naša krila Zemun (dissolved 1950) and Galenika/FK Zemun are not related.

Bačka Subotica
1940/41 10.Bačka Subotica          18  2  3 13  19-58   7

Victoria Zemun
1941     8.Victoria Zemun           8  2  1  5  12-33   5

1943: quarterf.: HSK Zemun               (0-4, 2-1 vs HAŠK Zagreb)
1944: 2nd round: Građanski Zemun         (0-2, 0-3awd vs Borovo)

Incomplete lists of Serbian participants at group stage who did not 
reach the knock-out stage:
1942: Građanski Zemun, Victoria Zemun 
1944: Dunav Zemun, Građanski Zemun, Liet Zemun, Hajduk Zemun 

Albania

Kosovo

During World War II, Italian troups occupied Albania and parts of Yugoslavia, including Kosovo. (The occupation started slightly before the war, in April 1939.) The Albanian FA organised three unofficial championships during this time (in 1939, 1940 and 1942); in the last of the three, three clubs from Kosovo entered.

Kosovar clubs in the Albanian football structure

The 1942 unofficial championship was organised in three regional zones; the three Kosovar participants (Peja, Prishtina and Prizreni, from the towns of Pejë, Prishtinë and Prizren respectively) played in the Zona e Veriut (northern zone) along with Shkodra from Shkodër. Prizreni won the zone (played as a single round robin) and qualified for the national semifinals along with runners-up Shkodra. They held favourites Tirana to a draw (after extra time) in their semifinal on June 26, 1942, but lost the replay the next day. Shkodra, the 1940 champions who had sensationally lost 1-3 away to Prizreni in the zonal stage, had meanwhile beaten Berati (from Berat, the winners of the southern zone) and played the final against Tirana on June 29; they drew 1-1 but refused to play extra time, and therefore Tirana were declared champions. Note that the teams were all denoted in the press by their town names, though they were commonly understood to be the leading club team (SK Tirana, Vllaznia Shkodër, Tomori Berat etcetera) from each town.

(unofficial war-time) Championship

Prizreni
1942     1.Prizreni                 3  3  0  0  10- 2   6  [northern zone]
1942: semifinal: Prizreni                (2-2 aet, 1-2 vs Tirana)

Peja
1942     3.Peja                     3  0  1  2   3- 5   1  [northern zone]

Prishtina
1942     4.Prishtina                3  0  1  2   2- 9   1  [northern zone]

Japan

Russia | South Korea

Russian clubs in the Japanese football structure 1905-1945

Japan occupied the southern part of the Sakhalin island (known as Karafuto in Japanese) between 1905 and 1945; between 1918 and 1925 Japan also occupied the more northern region around Alexandrovsk-Sakhalinsky (Akō in Japanese), and it held all Kuril Islands (Chishima Islands) from Kunashir (main city Yuzhno-Kurilsk, Furukamappu in Japanese) to Paramushir (main city Severo-Kurilsk, Kashiwabara in Japanese) from 1875 to 1945 (Japan still claims the four southernmost Kuril islands, including Kunashir, but all are currently under Russian control). However, only on southern Sakhalin some minimal information on football activities during Japanese occupation is available. In 1921, first regional competitions in the southern part of Sakhalin were organised, in which teams from the cities of Toyohara (now Yuzhno-Sakhalinsk), Ōtomari (now Korsakov), Ochiai (now Dolinsk) and Maoka (now Kholmsk) participated, initiated by a publishing company. Starting from 1924 also youth competitions were organised. No data on winners are available.

Currently, Sakhalin has a regional championship at the fifth level of the Russian league pyramid, in which clubs from the above four cities as well as from southern Sakhalin cities such as Aniva (Rūtaka in Japanese), Makarov (Shirutoru in Japanese), Nevelsk (Honto in Japanese), Poronaysk (Shikuka in Japanese), Shakhtersk (Tōro in Japanese), Tomari (Tomarioru in Japanese) and Uglegorsk (Esutoru in Japanese) may enter.

In the 1992 and 1993 seasons, the region had a club playing at the second Russian level in Sakhalin Yuzhno-Sakhalinsk, who played in the eastern zone (one of three regional divisions), and finished 13rd (out of 16) in 1992 and 10th (out of 16) in 1993 (a season in which they had relocated to Kholmsk). As a nationwide second division (Pervaya Liga) was established for the 1994 season, only the top-5 remained at the second level and Sakhalin missed out. Afterwards, no club from the region has played higher than the third Russian league level (eastern group), most recently the same Sakhalin Yuzhno-Sakhalinsk, who have been there since 2007.

South Korean clubs in the Japanese football structure 1935-1936

Japan occupied large parts on the Asian continent (in particular Manchuria and Korea) and many Pacific islands prior to and during World War II. Two Korean clubs reached the final of the main Japanese football competition, the Emperor's Cup, during Japanese occupation (1910-1945), one (Seoul Shukyu-dan - its contemporary Korean name is not clear) winning it. Note that in this period Seoul was known as Keijō, Japanese being the official language, and the corresponding characters were pronounced Kyungsung (modern transcription Gyeongseong) in Korean. The 1935 Emperor's Cup winners from Seoul are not to be confused with the team from the Tokyo-based Keiō University which dominated Japanese football in the 1930s, winning 5 Emperor's Cups that decade, including the 1936 final against Poseung College.


Emperor's Cup

1935: winners:   Seoul Shukyu-dan        (2-0 vs Tokyo Bunri Daigaku)
1936: finalists: Poseung College         (2-3 vs Keiō Gijuku Daigaku BRB)

NB: Poseung College (also spelled Posung College) currently called
    Korea University and based in Seoul

South Africa

See the section on splits and unifications for a discussion of the four bantustans who were nominally independent from South Africa during the last decade and a half of the apartheid regime.

Namibian clubs in the South African football structure

After World War I, the former German colony of Südwestafrika became a League of Nations mandate area entrusted to South Africa. After World War II, South Africa annexed the country, without international recognition. After a struggle of decades, the area gained independence as Namibia in 1990, a few years before the end of the apartheid regime in South Africa. During South African rule, various clubs from the region reached the national second division (in the all-white NFL), though never the top flight. In 1966, the first season in which the South West African league structure was integrated into the NFL, South West African champions SK Windhoek entered the promotion playoffs to the top level, but lost 0-9 to Corinthians (who were promoted). Only a few second division league finishes of Windhoek clubs are known, see below. After the 1974 season, Windhoek City merged with SK Windhoek into Sportklub Windhoek City; the merger club continued playing in the second division until the NFL was dissolved in 1977.

South West Africa also entered the amateur championship on South Africa, which was run on an inter-provincial basis, and once won it, in the late 80s, with Frankie Fredericks (the later Olympic medal winner in sprinting) in their team.

The city of Walvis Bay (founded as Walvisbaai between 1720 and 1725, and known as Walfischbucht in German) was part of the South African Cape Province between 1910 and 1911 and again between 1971 and 1977, when the area came under direct rule by the South African government. It was returned to independent Namibia in 1994, after the end of apartheid. A local club, Sparta United, entered the early rounds of the South African cup on various occasions.

NFL - National Division II
1969     9.Windhoek Ramblers       18  5  1 12  19-70  11
1974     8.Windhoek City           24  9  5 10  44-46  23

Morocco

Ifni | Western Sahara

Like Ceuta and Melilla, which are still Spanish territories, Ifni (now in southwestern Morocco) was a coastal Spanish exclave during colonial times, and, unlike Tetuán, remained Spanish when Morocco gained independence. Between 1946 and 1958 it was ruled together with Western Sahara before becoming an overseas Spanish province on its own after a Moroccan invasion attempt. In 1969, following international pressure, Spain relinquished the area to Morocco.

Morocco occupied Western Sahara shortly after Spain released the area into independence. Two clubs from the main city Laâyoune (El Ayoun) have played in the top division, though without much tangible success; however, JS de la Massira reached the semifinals of the national cup competition, the Coupe du Trône, on 4 separate occasions.

Ifni clubs in the Moroccan football structure

When Ifni was relinquished to Morocco in 1969, 4 local football clubs existed: Balompédica CF, CD Africa, Atlético Español de Fútbol and CD Ifni. All were based in the capital town Sidi Ifni. It is unknown how these clubs performed within the Spanish football structure or whether regional championships were organised.

Currently, Tihad Sidi Ifni are playing at the third level in Morocco (they may have played at the second level previously, but probably not at the first level). As Tihad is short for Ittihad, meaning Union, they may have been created as a merger of the old 'Spanish' clubs.

Western Saharan clubs in the Moroccan football structure

CSE Laâyoune were the first club from the area to be promoted to the Moroccan top level league, in 1984, but they only lasted three seasons there (and the third only because of an extension of the top flight to 24 clubs, distributed over 2 groups).

Championship

1984/85  ?.CSE Laâyoune
1985/86 19.CSE Laâyoune            38  6 11 21  20-48  61 
1986/87 11.CSE Laâyoune            22  2  6 14  28-49  32  [group A]
In 1995, the Auxiliary Forces team, based in Ben Slimane, who had finished ninth in the 1994/95 league championship, were moved to Laâyoune and renamed Jeunesse Sportive de la Massira; Massira is the name for the "Green March", staged on November 6, 1975 by about 300,000 (unarmed) Moroccans occupying areas of the former Spanish colony of Western Sahara rich in natural resources. The club occasionally managed a finish in the top half of the table but were relegated in 2012. They have enjoyed more (relative) success in the Coupe du Trône, having reached (and being eliminated at) the semifinal stage on 4 occasions.

Championship

1995/96 10.JS de la Massira        30  9 13  8  31-30  40
1996/97  4.JS de la Massira        30 14  9  7  43-30  51
1997/98 12.JS de la Massira        30  9  8 13  26-36  35
1998/99  9.JS de la Massira        30 10  6 14  26-43  36
1999/00 13.JS de la Massira        30  4 15 11  19-34  27
2000/01 14.JS de la Massira        30  6 12 12  27-33  30
2001/02  9.JS de la Massira        30  8 11 11  32-45  35
2002/03  8.JS de la Massira        30  7 13 10  25-32  34
2003/04 11.JS de la Massira        30  7 14  9  20-25  35
2004/05  5.JS de la Massira        30  9 12  9  26-25  39
2005/06 13.JS de la Massira        30  5 17  8  23-26  32
2006/07  8.JS de la Massira        30  8 13  9  21-21  37 
2007/08  9.JS de la Massira        30  8 14  8  27-28  38 
2008/09 12.JS de la Massira        30  8 10 12  31-41  34
2009/10 13.JS de la Massira        30  8 10 12  26-33  34
2010/11 11.JS de la Massira        30  8 10 12  24-35  34
2011/12 15.JS de la Massira        30  7  7 16  24-42  28

Cup

1997: semifinal: JS de la Massira        (2-3 vs WAC Casablanca)
2000: 1/8 final: JS de la Massira        (1-1 aet, 2-4 pen vs KAC Kénitra)
2001: semifinal: JS de la Massira        (1-4 vs MAS Fès)
2002: 1/8 final: JS de la Massira        (0-1 vs KAC Marrakech)
2003: quarterf.: JS de la Massira        (2-3 aet vs Raja Casablanca)
2004: semifinal: JS de la Massira        (0-1 vs FAR Rabat)
2005: semifinal: JS de la Massira        (0-1 vs OC Khouribga)

Ethiopia

Eritrea became an autonomous state within Ethiopia in 1952, and remained so until 1962 when Addis Abeba revoked the autonomy and factually annexed the country, its only access to the Red Sea. After a lenghty war, Eritrea were granted independence in 1993.

The first season in which Eritrean clubs entered the Ethiopian football structure was 1953; it is not known for how long they continued to participate actively, but until the mid seventies they did so with considerably success, in particular in the late fifties and early seventies in the league, and in the eighties in the cup.

Eritrean clubs in the Ethiopian football structure

We only list Eritrean clubs winning the national championship or cup, as only limited data are available. Among the clubs listed, Red Sea (also known as Key Baher) won the championship of independent Eritrea 6 times since 1995. None of the others appear to have 'survived' independence; in any case none are mentioned in the (sparse) available data on football in independent Eritrea. Akale Guzay (1958 Ethiopian champions) was the former name of Embassoyra (1974 champions), and Asmara (1972 and 1973 champions of Ethiopia) were known as Hamassien (champions 1955 and 1957) before. As far as is known, all clubs mentioned are or were based in the Eritrean capital Asmara.
Note that Hamassien/Asmara, Akale Guzay/Embassoyra and Tele SC all played in the 1946/47 Eritrean championship under Italian rule. Hamassien won the 1949 Coppa Torino in the colonial era. A club called Mar Rosso also existed at the time, and played for one season (apparently 1947/48) in the Eritrean championship under Italian rule, but finished last and were relegated; they reportedly were dissolved later and are therefore not directly related to the aforementioned Red Sea, Ethiopian cup winners of 1981 and 1983.

When Ethiopia won the African Nations Cup at home in 1962, their team was dominated by players from Eritrea, including the brothers Luciano and Italo Vassalo, of mixed Italian-Eritrean parentage; to this day, Luciano remains the second highest goal scorer at African Nations Cup final tournaments for Ethiopia, with six goals between 1962 and 1968. As in the case of the 1976 European Championship of Czechoslovakia, won by a predominantly Slovak side, it is in fact unfair to credit this title to the nominal successor federation (it is the only African Nations Cup title Ethiopia ever won).

Championship

1955     1.Hamassien
1957     1.Hamassien
1958     1.Akale Guzay
1959     1.Tele SC
1969     1.Tele SC
1970     1.Tele SC
1972     1.Asmara
1973     1.Asmara
1974     1.Embassoyra

NB: in 1953, Hamassien lost the championship final 3-4 to Army (from
    Addis Abeba);
    some sources claim Red Sea (Asmara) won the 1948 championship, but
    apparently the champions were Red Sea (Addis Abeba).

Cup

1970: winners:   Asmara
1981: winners:   Red Sea
1983: winners:   Red Sea
1984: winners:   Eritrea Shoes
1985: winners:   Eritrea Shoes
1987: winners:   Eritrea Shoes

China

Note that China only organises an national football championship since 1951, so after Taiwan became de facto independent. Prior to this, there were National Games (7 editions between 1910 and 1948, held on 10 occasions since) and Inter-Sectional Football Championships (7 editions between 1926 and 1933) but the island of Taiwan was never involved in any of those. Hongkong did participate in various National Games, as did selections of Chinese from Malaysia, the Philippines and Thailand; see the section on border moves.

Tibetan teams in the Chinese football structure

Tibet, which had been de facto independent from 1913 to 1950, was annexed by China in 1951. Nothing is known about football in the region prior to the annexation. In recent years, two 'Tibet' club teams played at the third level of the Chinese league structure. In 2003, Beijing-based Tibet Xuequan did so; in 2004 Tibet Huitong Luhua, based in Baoding (Hebei province) entered. This club moved to Beijing for 2005, and reached the promotion playoffs. After their quarterfinal exit, the club bought the franchise of second level Dalian Changbo, relocated to Taiyuan (after first intending to play in Heilongjiang province - the completely opposite side of China seen from Tibet) and renamed it Shanxi Luhu. Before the 2007 season, the club was renamed Hohhot and relocated to the city of that name, the capital of Inner Mongolia. None of the cities mentioned is remotely close to Tibet - Taiyuan is about 2000 kilometres from Lhasa, as the bird flies, and the others are (much) further away. So the relationship of these two clubs with Tibet is probably comparable to that of Montevideo-based clubs Bristol, Dublin and Liverpool (all once top level clubs in Uruguay) with the corresponding cities in Britain and Ireland.
Much earlier, in 1965, a Tibet 'representative' team finished 5th (from 15) in one of the four Division Two groups, missing out on the second level championship playoffs. In the seventies, the Chinese football championship involved up to 45 teams, mostly provincial selections, army units or youth sides. Tibet participated on various occasions. These tournaments were played in four first stage groups, with the best teams playing off for the title and the others for the lower placings. In 1974, Tibet withdrew from the playoffs for 25th to 45th place which they were to enter; in 1976, the second stage was not played because of the upheavals following the death of Mao. In 1978, a 16-team top flight was installed, and Tibet entered Division 2, finishing 20th from 22. In 1979, they dropped 2 places and finished bottom of Division 2. Since then, no Tibet representation or club team has played above the third level, with the exception of the 1986 season when the second division had 33 teams and Tibet finished 5th in their 9-team first round group.

Championship

Tibet (4 top level seasons)
1973    32.Tibet                   17  1  0 16   9-53   2  [aggregate record]
1974     -.Tibet                    9  0  0  9   5-29   0  [first stage]
1976     -.Tibet                    9  1  4  4   9-17   6  [first stage]
1977    38.Tibet                   15  1  5  9  18-33   7  [aggregate record]
NB: no championship organised in 1975.

India

Goa | Sikkim

Since obtaining independence from Britian, India's borders underwent several changes. The most spectacular was the separation from Pakistan (later split into Pakistan and Bangladesh; with Pakistan there is a long standing conflict on the Jammu and Kashmir region - teams from the part currently controlled by India occasionally enter Indian tournaments, but it is not known whether there ever were football competitions covering the entire region). There were also several additions: India annexed 'French India' (Karikal, Yanaon and Mahé) in 1956 and the Portuguese colonies of Goa, Diu and Damão in 1962, as well as Sikkim through a referendum in 1975.

Goan teams in the Indian football structure

Football was reportedly introduced to Goa in 1883, but before Goa came to India in 1962, an official league had been going on for just a decade. The ten league championships played out between 1951/52 and 1960/61 were shared by CD Vasco da Gama (3 titles), AD Velha Goa (2 titles), CD Chinchinim, Independente de Margao, GD Polícia, CD Salgaocar and Sporting Clube de Goa (all 1 title); among those 7 clubs, Salgaocar (renamed Salgaocar SC) won 17 Goan leagues between 1962/63 and 2008, Vasco da Gama (renamed Vasco SC) 3 and Sporting Clube de Goa 1 (in 2006 - their first championship since 1952/53).

Moreover, Goan clubs have played a dominant role since the introduction of a national football league in India in the 1996/97 season, seriously challenging Calcutta's long-time undisputed standing as the strongest football region in the country. Goan clubs claimed 9 (Salgaocar in 1998/99 and 2010/11, Dempo in 2004/05, 2006/07, 2007/08, 2009/10 and 2011/12 and Churchill Brothers in 2008/09 and 2012/13) of the 18 disputed championships (3 more than Calcutta (nowadays officially called Kolkata) - 3 each for the two eternal rivals East Bengal and Mohun Bagan), and showed considerable greater strength in depth: among the eighteen league runners-up, 8 were from Goa, which also accounted for 10 of the teams finishing third.

Goa's strength in depth was particularly clear in the first few years after the turn of the millennium: in 2002/03 the tiny state, accounting for little more than 0.1 percent of the country's surface and population, provided 4 of the 12 league clubs (Calcutta 3) and all finished in the top-6; in 2003/04 Goa fielded 5 of the 12 top flight outfits (Calcutta 4) and all finished in the top-8; and in 2004/05 the former Portuguese colony accounted for half (6 out of 12) of the top division participants (Calcutta just 3), claiming the top two positions as well. Although all 6 Goan clubs finished in the top-10, a reduction of the league (from 12 to 10 participants) meant 2 Goan clubs were relegated, and as another 2 went down in 2005/06 (while Churchill Brothers went the opposite direction), 2006/07 had 'just' 3 Goan participants among the 10 top flight teams - equal to Calcutta's share. In fact, in each and every league season up to and including 2013/14, Goa had the highest number of teams participating (sometimes equalled, but never bested, by Calcutta and/or Mumbai).

Note that the seasons 1996/97 and 1998/99 were played over two stages, with a 2-group first stage from which 8 clubs qualified for the championship playoff.

Championship

Churchill Brothers SC (17 top level seasons)
1996/97  2.Churchill Brothers SC   19 10  6  3  27-16  36  [aggregate record]
1997/98  9.Churchill Brothers SC   18  4  7  7  20-26  19
1998/99  3.Churchill Brothers SC   20  7  8  5  27-21  29  [aggregate record]
1999/00  2.Churchill Brothers SC   22 12  5  5  36-17  41
2000/01  3.Churchill Brothers SC   22 10  6  6  32-25  36
2001/02  2.Churchill Brothers SC   22 12  6  4  44-19  42
2002/03  5.Churchill Brothers SC   22 10  7  5  33-22  37
2003/04  4.Churchill Brothers SC   22 10  6  6  29-24  36
2004/05  9.Churchill Brothers SC   22  5  8  9  23-33  23
2006/07  4.Churchill Brothers SC   18  7  8  3  30-23  29  
2007/08  2.Churchill Brothers SC   18 11  3  4  40-22  36
2008/09  1.Churchill Brothers SC   22 13  7  2  53-23 46
2009/10  2.Churchill Brothers SC   26 11 10  5  51-35  43 
2010/11  4.Churchill Brothers SC   26 14  8  4  57-31  50  
2011/12  3.Churchill Brothers SC   26 14  6  6  47-28  48
2012/13  1.Churchill Brothers SC   26 16  7  3  56-22  55
2013/14 11.Churchill Brothers SC   24  6  7 11  25-37  25 

Dempo SC (16 top level seasons)
1996/97  4.Dempo SC                19  8  6  5  26-18  30  [aggregate record]
1997/98  6.Dempo SC                18  5  7  6  20-22  22
1998/99  5.Dempo SC                10  2  3  5   6-11   9  [group A]
1999/00 12.Dempo SC                22  1  8 13   9-34  11
2002/03  6.Dempo SC                22 10  5  7  34-29  35
2003/04  2.Dempo SC                22 12  9  1  28-12  45
2004/05  1.Dempo SC                22 14  5  3  28-17  47
2005/06  5.Dempo SC                17  6  7  4  29-22  25
2006/07  1.Dempo SC                18 11  3  4  37-21  36  
2007/08  1.Dempo SC                18 10  6  2  35-13  36
2008/09  4.Dempo SC                22  8  7  7  35-26  31 
2009/10  1.Dempo SC                26 16  6  4  54-31  54
2010/11  3.Dempo SC                26 15  5  6  63-34  50 
2011/12  1.Dempo SC                26 18  3  5  59-21  57
2012/13  5.Dempo SC                26 11  7  8  45-33  40 
2013/14  4.Dempo SC                24  9  8  7  31-25  35

Salgaocar SC (16 top level seasons)
1996/97  7.Salgaocar SC            19  5  7  7  10-13  22  [aggregate record]
1997/98  3.Salgaocar SC            18  8  6  4  19-13  30
1998/99  1.Salgaocar SC            20 11  6  3  34-14  39  [aggregate record]
1999/00  3.Salgaocar SC            22 11  6  5  26-15  39
2000/01  6.Salgaocar SC            22  8  2 12  23-26  26
2001/02  4.Salgaocar SC            22 10  9  3  32-17  39
2002/03  2.Salgaocar SC            22 13  5  4  43-17  44
2003/04  7.Salgaocar SC            22  7  6  9  24-23  27
2004/05  6.Salgaocar SC            22  7  7  8  26-24  28
2005/06  9.Salgaocar SC            17  2  6  9  15-29  12
2007/08 10.Salgaocar SC            18  1  8  9  20-37  11
2009/10  6.Salgaocar SC            26  8  9  9  34-38  33 
2010/11  1.Salgaocar SC            26 18  2  6  58-27  56 
2011/12  6.Salgaocar SC            26 12  8  6  32-19  44
2012/13  7.Salgaocar SC            26  9  6 11  34-29  33
2013/14  3.Salgaocar SC            24 11  6  7  36-25  39

Sporting Clube de Goa (10 top level seasons)
2003/04  8.Sporting Clube de Goa   22  7  6  9  34-35  27
2004/05  2.Sporting Clube de Goa   22 14  3  5  46-23  45
2005/06  4.Sporting Clube de Goa   17  6  7  4  24-16  25
2006/07  6.Sporting Clube de Goa   18  6  7  5  23-19  25
2007/08  7.Sporting Clube de Goa   18  4  7  7  14-24  19 
2008/09  3.Sporting Clube de Goa   22 13  4  5  28-20  43
2009/10 13.Sporting Clube de Goa   26  6  9 11  30-40  27 
2011/12  8.Sporting Clube de Goa   26 11  7  8  53-43  40
2012/13  6.Sporting Clube de Goa   26  9  8  9  36-41  35
2013/14  5.Sporting Clube de Goa   24  9  7  8  34-34  34

Vasco SC (6 top level seasons)
2000/01  5.Vasco SC                22  5 12  5  13-17  27
2001/02  3.Vasco SC                22 12  4  6  28-20  40
2002/03  3.Vasco SC                22 12  7  3  40-21  43
2003/04  6.Vasco SC                22  6 10  6  22-19  28
2004/05 10.Vasco SC                22  5  5 12  25-37  20
2008/09 12.Vasco SC                22  2  4 16  14-49  19

Fransa FC (2 top level seasons, 1 abandoned)
2004/05  5.Fransa FC               22  8  6  8  24-26  30
2005/06 10.Fransa-Pax FC            9  0  4  5   2-13   4

Federation Cup

1987: finalists: Salgaocar SC            (0-2 vs Mohun Bagan)
1988: winners:   Salgaocar SC            (1-0 vs Border Security Force)
1989: winners:   Salgaocar SC            (2-0 aet vs Mohammedan Sporting)
1990: finalists: Salgaocar SC            (1-2 vs Kerala Police)
1994: finalists: Salgaocar SC            (0-0 aet, 3-4 pen vs Mohun Bagan)
1996: finalists: Dempo SC                (1-2 asdet vs East Bengal)
1997: winners:   Salgaocar SC            (2-1 asdet vs East Bengal)
2001: finalists: Dempo SC                (0-2 vs Mohun Bagan)   
2004: winners:   Dempo SC                (2-0 vs Mohun Bagan)   
2005: finalists: Sporting Clube de Goa   (1-2 aet vs Mahindra United)
2006: finalists: Sporting Clube de Goa   (1-1 aet, 2-3 pen vs Mohun Bagan)   
2008: finalists: Dempo SC                (0-1 vs Mohun Bagan)   
2011: winners:   Salgaocar SC            (3-1 vs East Bengal)
2012: finalists: Dempo SC                (2-3 aet vs East Bengal)
2014: winners:   Churchill Brothers      (3-1 vs Sporting Clube de Goa)
2014: finalists: Sporting Clube de Goa   (1-3 vs Churchill Brothers)
Sikkim teams in the Indian football structure

The until then independent Himalaya kingdom of Sikkim, bordering to its west on Nepal, to its north on China (more precisely, Tibet) and to its east on Bhutan, entered India as its 22nd state following a referendum in 1975 (after an earlier rejection by popular vote in 1947; after that, Sikkim had obtained a special 'protectorate' status). China did not recognise this move until 2003; in return India then recognised China's possession of Tibet. The capital of the state is Gangtok, also its largest town.
Currently the most important football tournament in the region is the invitational Sikkim Governor's Gold Cup, which draws participants from India, Bangladesh, Bhutan and Nepal; the 2006 edition even included a team from Nigeria. Its inaugural edition in 1979 was won by local side GMC from Gangtok; since then, no local team has reached the final.
Prior to 1975, the dominant teams in Sikkim had been Sikkim Guards and Kumar Sporting Club (which already won an unspecified tournament outside of Sikkim in 1948); in the early seventies, they were joined by 1/3rd Gorkha Rifles, an army team which had been moved to Sikkim. No information is available on domestic competitions in Sikkim in this era. Sikkim representative teams played in tournaments outside the area (e.g. in Darjeeling) as well, but also here details are lacking. The current Sikkim FA was formed in 1976; its predecessor was the Gangtok Football and Sporting Association.

Since the inclusion of the state in India, Sikkim are irregular and unsuccessful entrants in the Santosh Trophy, a competition for state selections. This is (usually) played over two group stages followed by semifinals and final. In their best ever performance, in 2004, Sikkim reached the quarterfinal group stage (involving 12 teams divided in 4 groups of 3) after beating both Orissa and Pondicherry 4-3; they then lost both second stage matches heavily (1-5 to Manipur and 1-6 to Karnataka).
In the league pyramid, Sikkim club teams occasionally entered the second level (played in various regional groups followed by a final national stage in which promotion can be earned). United Sikkim FC were the first team from the region to reach the final stage, in 2010/11, and earned promotion to the top level I-League in 2011/12 only to be relegated again next season, finishing last. However, Sikkim's main claim to fame in football terms remains the fact that Baichung Bhutia, the best Indian player in the beginning of the 21st century, was born there; he is co-owner of United Sikkim and played for 20 minutes as a substitute in the match in which the club clinched promotion.

Championship

United Sikkim FC (Gangtok) (1 top level season)
2012/13 16.United Sikkim

Championship (Division 2)

Boys Athletic Club (Gangtok)
2001/02  5.Boys Athletic Club       3  0  0  3   1- 7   0  [group II]
NB: result of last group match (presumably lost) unknown

Denzong Boyz FC (Gangtok)
2009/10  7.Denzong Boyz             6  0  1  5   2-14   1  [group C]
2010/11  7.Denzong Boyz             6  0  2  4   8-21   2  [group B]

United Sikkim FC (Gangtok)
2010/11  1.United Sikkim            6  4  1  1  15- 7  13  [group A]
         5.United Sikkim            7  2  4  1   9- 9  10  [final stage]
2011/12  1.United Sikkim            6  4  1  1  18- 7  13  [group C]
         1.United Sikkim           12  6  4  2  22-17  22  [final stage]

Cup (Santosh Trophy)

Sikkim (best ever performance only)
2004     -.Sikkim                   4  2  0  2  10-14   6  [aggregate record]

Indonesia

East Timor | Western New Guinea

East Timor clubs in the Indonesian football structure

Indonesian invaded the former Portuguese colony East Timor in 1975, when Portugal had granted the area independence, and occupied it until 1999, the western world being rather more lenient with Suharto than with Saddam Hussein when he invaded Kuwait under comparable pretexts a decade and a half later. On at least one occasion, a club from the capital Dili, Persedil, played at the second level (Divisi Satu) of the amateur championship, Perserikatan, in 1983, missing out on qualification for the quarterfinal stage (8 Besar) in their last group match in which they lost 1-3 to Persisam (Samarinda), when a draw would have been sufficient for qualification. They had earlier lost 1-4 to Persib (Bandung), who would eventually win promotion to the top level (Divisi Utama) together with three other clubs, and beaten PSSA (Asahan) 4-3. Another Dili club, called Summa FC, representing Bank Summa, then a major private bank in Indonesia, played two matches in Sleman (near Yogyakarta, central Java) against local side PSK Kalasan (to whom they lost 1-2) and Surabaya amateur team Suryanaga (who beat them 4-1) as part of the national stage of another amateur tournament in 1991/92, but the status of that competition is not clear.

Perserikatan - Divisi Satu - Grup B
1983     3.Persedil (Dili)          3  1  0  2   6-10   2

Western New Guinean clubs in the Indonesian football structure

When the Dutch East Indies became independent as Indonesia in 1949, the Netherlands kept the western part of New Guinea, which remained a Dutch colony until 1962. It was to obtain full independence by 1971, but following Indonesian mobilisation and pressure from the US administration under Kennedy, the Netherlands handed over the territory to UN administration in October 1962, which in turn handed the area to Indonesia in May 1963. A plebiscite was organised in 1969, which resulted in a 100% vote for continued Indonesian rule over the area (called Irian Jaya between 1973 and 2002, when it was renamed Papua), while the eastern half of the island (ruled by Australia at the time) is now independent as Papua New Guinea.

During Dutch rule, football was only played at local level, in particular in and around the capital Hollandia, founded in 1910 and currently (since the centenary celebrations in 2010) officially called Port Numbay after temporary name changes to Sukarnopura (1963-1968) and Jayapura (1968-2010; this name is still widely used).
Hollandia was home to two football associations, both organising their own competitions, namely the V.H.O. (Voetbalbond Hollandia en Omstreken, founded in 1950), which initially was restricted to Europeans and their descendants, and the V.B.H. (Voetbal Bond Hollandia, founded in 1949), in which the local population had a place (in later years, Papua's also gained access to the V.H.O.). Occasionally matches between selections from Hollandia and Biak were organised. The V.H.O. league was won by W.I.K. in five consecutive seasons from 1956 to 1960 (no data are available on earlier seasons) and by E.D.O, founded in April 1950 and reportedly the oldest club in Hollandia, in 1961, while the V.B.H. champions were Ajapo in 1959 and S.V.C. in 1960.
At the end of the 1959 season, a playoff between the top-3 of both leagues was organised for the first time, with P.O.M.S. winning in 1959/60 and Spoetnik and H.V.C. sharing first place in 1961/62 (the 1960/61 edition was abandoned after one match due to internal problems in the V.B.H.).
In 1962, the two federations merged to organise a unified league, the E.D.H. (Ere Divisie Hollandia), but no data on that are available after September 1962.

In July 1959, the Voetbalbond Merauke started a qualifying competition between 14 clubs to decide 7 entrants in the inaugural eerste klasse. No further data are available. In addition, a federation existed in Fakfak (Voetbalbond Fakfak); as early as January 19th, 1935, a local club named Fakfak had played a team from Flores, a visiting ship, winning 4-1. However, no further details are known. In May 1936, the Doreh-voetbalclub was founded in Manokwari, then the centre of football activities on Dutch New Guinea, where 6 clubs played in the 1937/38 league organised by the local football federation, won by Leeuwenhart.

It is unknown whether any of the above clubs survived since the area became Indonesian; the current top club from the island, Persipura from Jayapura (colours: white-black), which claims foundation in 1950, are the product of the 1962 merger between the V.H.O. and the V.B.H.
Persipura won the 2005 Indonesian championship, beating hosts Persija 3-2 after extra time in the final in Jakarta. Persipura also lost three consecutive Indonesian cup finals (for the Copa Dji Sam Soe): in 2006 to Arema from Malang, and in both 2007 and 2008/09 to Sriwijaya FC from Palembang. They claimed their second national title in Indonesia in 2008/09, their third in 2010/11 and their fourth (a record) in 2013. They also were runners-up in the amateur championship of 1980, losing the final 1-3 to Persiraja from Banda Aceh (capital of Aceh in Northern Sumatra) and won the last ever second level (Divisi Satu) championship of the Perserikatan in 1993 (the amateur and semiprofessional league structures merged in 1994), a championship they had won before in 1979.

Other clubs from the area playing a role at the higher levels of the Indonesian league structure are Persiwa from Wamena (supposedly founded in 1925, which presumably refers to the foundation of a local federation under Dutch rule; they played at top level between 2006 and 2013, during which period they once finished runners-up (in 2008/09, behind Persipura) and once finished third (in 2012, behind Sriwijaya FC and Persipura)), Perseman from Manokwari (founded in 1950 and runners-up of the Perserikatan in 1986, losing the final 0-1 to Persib from Bandung; they last played at the top level in 2007), Persidafon from Dafonsoro (at the second level 2010), Persiram from Raja Ampat (who play at the top level since 2011/12), Persiss from Sorong (competitors at the second level from 1989 to 2002), Perseru from Serui (promoted to the second level in 2010 and to the top level for the 2014 season after finishing the second level as runners-up to Persebaya in 2013) and PSBS from Biak Numfor (at the second level since 2011/12).

Note that Indonesia also assumed control over the Southern Moluccas (Maluku Selatan) against the declared will of the majority of the population (which migrated in great numbers to the Netherlands) shortly after gaining independence. However, little is known about a separate football structure for this group of islands prior to their annexation by Indonesia; a regional league was organised on Ambon during the colonial era, won by H.V.C. in 1933. PS Ambon reached the interzonal stage of the Indonesian championship 1957-59 (corresponding to being among the top 15 clubs of the tournament), the championship playoff of 1964 (in which they finished 7th among 9 clubs) and the interzonal stage in 1964/65 (corresponding to being among the top 10 clubs of the tournament). The P.O.M.S. club in Hollandia listed above presumably was founded by members from the Ambonese diaspora (already in the colonial era, Ambonese clubs existed throughout the Indonesian archipelago, such as V.O.P. in Medan, S.V.J.A. in Batavia and Mena Moeria in Soerabaja; when Batavia became Djakarta (now Jakarta), the local S.V.J.A. (Sport Vereniging Jong Ambon) were renamed P.O.M.S., a more or less straightforward translation of their name into Indonesian).

Israel

Israel occupied the West Bank and the Gaza Strip in 1967, following the Six-Day war. For the definition of Israel, Palestine and British Palestine in the context of this document, see the section on British Palestine.

Palestinian clubs in the Israeli football structure since 1967

Various Arab clubs were set up in Israel in the 1950s and 1960s, in cities such as Akko, Furaydis, Jaljulia, Kafr-Kana, Kafr-Kasem, Kafr-Yassif, Lod, Majd El-Kurum, Meilya, Nazareth, Taibe, Tarshiha and Tira. The first of these to reach the Israeli top flight were Hapoel Taibe in 1996/97, but they lasted only one season. In 2003, two Arab clubs won promotion from the second level, the Liga Leumit; champions Maccabi Ahi Nazareth were immediately relegated in 2003/04, but runners-up, Hapoel Bnei Sakhnin, lasted three seasons and won the 2003/04 Israeli cup, thereby qualifying for the 2004/05 UEFA Cup. They were relegated at the end of 2005/06 but returned to the top flight for the 2007/08 season.
But Palestinian clubs from the Gaza Strip and the West Bank are restricted to their own regional championships and cups (interaction between the two areas has been minimal) and no clubs from the area have entered the Israeli league structure, apart from clubs from Jewish settlements in the area, who form leagues at the Israeli lower levels.

Jordan

Jordan annexed the West Bank in 1948, following the Arab-Israeli War, and lost it to Israel in 1967, following the Six-Day war. In 1988, Jordan relinquished its claims on the area.
For the definition of Palestine (including the West Bank) in the context of this document, see the section on British Palestine.

Palestinian clubs in the Jordan football structure 1948-1967

Nothing is known about clubs from the West Bank entering Jordan football competitions.

However, following the 1948 mass exodus of Palestinians from areas now in Israel, a number of Palestinian clubs were formed in Jordan, such as Al-Wahdat (founded 1956), Shabab Al-Hussein (1954) and Al-Baqa'a (1968), all named after Palestinian refugee camps in Jordan. Most successful has been Al-Wahdat ("Unity", referring to the unity between both banks of the Jordan river; the club was temporarily called Al-Deffatain ("The Two Banks") between 1986 and 1988, when Jordan withdrew its claim on the West Bank). They joined the Jordan league in 1966, reached the top level in 1975, and have since won 10 Jordan championships, 6 Jordan cups, 8 Jordan Super Cups and 7 Jordan FA Shields. But as they are based within the internationally recognised borders of Jordan, they do not qualify as 'club from Palestine in Jordan'. Other 'Palestinian' clubs were formed in other Arab countries, in particular Syria and Iraq, where Nadi Haifa Al-Riyadhi (Haifa Sports Club, founded 1979 and named after the city from which the first wave of Palestinian refugees to Iraq originated, but based in Baghdad) played one season (1999/00) in the top division, finishing 26th and last after winning 3 and drawing 9 of their 50(!) matches.

Egypt

Egypt occupied the Gaza Strip in 1948, following the Arab-Israeli War, and lost it to Israel in 1967, following the Six-Day war.
For the definition of Palestine (including the Gaza Strip) in the context of this document, see the section on British Palestine.

Palestinian clubs in the Egyptian football structure

There was a regional league in the Gaza Strip in the 1960s, but no data are available, and it is not known whether there was any (competitive) interaction between clubs from the Gaza Strip and those in the regular Egyptian league structure.

France

Algeria | French Guyana | Guadeloupe | Martinique | Mayotte | Morocco | New Caledonia | Reunion | Tahiti (French Polynesia) | Tunisia

Clubs from Northern Africa (Algeria, Morocco and Tunisia) entered the Coupe de France between 1954 and 1960 (the Moroccan and Tunisian clubs only until 1956). The best ever performance of any such club undoubtedly was the win of SC Union El Biar over Stade de Reims (European Cup finalists the previous season!) in Toulouse, on February 3, 1957. Until 1957/58, the African clubs did not meet those from France itself (the Hèxagone) until the sixth round (the last round before the 1/32 finals, the stage at which the top level clubs entered); in 1958/59 and 1959/60, Algerian teams already played European ones in the fifth round.

Clubs from the French overseas regions (Départements d'Outre-Mer, abbreviated D.O.M., which legally have the same status as the departments in the Hèxagone, and Territoires d'Outre-Mer, abbreviated T.O.M., which have a more 'colonial' status) have entered the Coupe de France, the French domestic cup, since the 1961/62 season, when CS Moulien from Guadeloupe played a fifth round tie against FC Dieppe, losing 2-3.
The first club to win a tie were Golden Star from Martinique in 1974/75, who eliminated third level US Melun after a replay before losing 0-8 to OGC Nice.
So far, three overseas clubs have managed to survive two rounds: in 1988/89, ASC Geldar from Kourou in French Guyana eliminated EAC Chaumont and FC Sens before losing 0-11 on aggregate (over 2 legs) to top club FC Nantes; in 1994/95, SS Saint-Louisienne from Reunion threw SA Epinal and Chamois Niortais out of the cup before succumbing to top level side AS Cannes; and in 2008/09 SS Jeanne d'Arc, also from Reunion, eliminated Saint-Louis Neuweg and SC Feignies, before losing 1-7 at home to second level club Tours FC in round 9.
The most successful overseas club is Club Franciscain from Martinique, who won 6 ties at the national level (in 6 different seasons, and from 11 entries, also a record); they are followed by SS Saint-Louisienne from Reunion with 4 won ties; no other overseas club survived more than two ties at the national level.
The 2007/08 cup was a particularly good one for the clubs from the Caribbean region: the 3 participants from French Guyana, Guadeloupe and Martinique all won their ties in the seventh (and first national) round; it was the second time ever this happened (after 1980/81). However, all were eliminated in the eighth round (as 27 years before).
Currently, the overseas clubs enter in the seventh round of the tournament (which is still far from the final - top level clubs do not enter until the ninth round, corresponding to the round of 64 (1/32 finals) and the cup final is the fourteenth round). In all regions, a knock-out tournament called Coupe de France (or Coupe de France régionale) is played (separately from the 'normal' cup tournament of the region) whose winners earn a tie against a club from the European continent.
Below all entrants from the French overseas regions are listed, as well as all the ties in which they were successful; additional information can be found in the file on D.O.M./T.O.M. Clubs in the Coupe de France.

For all clubs, seasons in which they survived one tie are given in italics, those in which they eliminated two clubs in bold face.

Algerian clubs in the French football structure

SC Union El Biar eliminated Stade de Reims (who had narrowly (3-4, after taking a 2-0 lead, and conceding the winning goal in the 79th minute) lost the 1955/56 European Cup final against Real Madrid!) in Toulouse, on February 3, 1957. Stade de Reims were the third club from France itself to fall to the pieds noirs that season, making SCUEB's run in the 1956/57 Coupe de France easily the best ever by any 'colonial' club in a European cup competition.

Below, all Algerian teams to have met European opposition from the 6th round (the second inter-ligues round, and the last before the 1/32 finals, at which stage the French top level clubs entered) onwards are listed; various clubs also played French clubs in the fifth rounds of 1958/59 (FC Oran - lost to SC Bastia) and 1959/60 (CAL Oran - lost to SC Draguignan; and ASPTT Constantine - lost to CA Montreuil after 2 replays). Prior to beating Red Star Alger in the 6th round 1959/60, AGS Mascara had already eliminated Stade Saint-Germain in the fifth round.

City name correspondence: 
colonial         current
Bône             Annaba

Cup

1955: 6th round: FC Blida                (0-5 vs UA Sedan-Torcy)
                 IS Mostaganem           (0-3 vs Stade Rennais)
                 Jeunesse Bône AC        (lost vs Stade Français)
1956: 6th round: Gallia Sports Alger     (0-1 vs Olympique Alès)
                 SC Bel-Abbès            (0-4 vs FC Nantes)
                 AS Saint Eugène Alger   (0-3 vs Stade Français)
1957: 6th round: SC Union El Biar        (2-0 vs SO Montpellier)
                 Gallia Sports Alger     (0-5 vs RCFC Besançon)
                 Gallia Club Oran        (1-3 aet vs FC Sète)
                 SC Bel-Abbès            (1-2 vs FC Nantes)
                 AS Batna                (1-4 aet vs SC Draguignan)
      1/32 fin.: SC Union El Biar        (1-1 aet, 1-0 vs AS Aix-en-Provence)
      1/16 fin.: SC Union El Biar        (2-0 vs Stade de Reims)
      1/8 final: SC Union El Biar        (0-4 vs Lille OSC)
1958: 6th round: Gallia Sports Alger     (2-1 vs CA Paris)
                 SC Bel-Abbès            (1-2 vs RC Strasbourg)
                 Racing Univ. Alger      (0-8 vs Stade Rennais)
                 IS Mostaganem           (1-7 vs SO Montpellier)
                 AS Bône                 (2-6 vs AS Cannes)
      1/32 fin.: Gallia Sports Alger     (1-1 aet, 0-1 vs Stade Rennais)
1959: 6th round: Olympique Hussein-Dey   (0-0 aet, 4-2 vs CO Roubaix-Tourcoing)
                 SC Bel-Abbès            (2-0 vs CA Paris)
                 Red Star Alger          (0-4 vs SC Toulon)
                 ROP Constantine         (0-2 vs FC Sète)
      1/32 fin.: Olympique Hussein-Dey   (1-2 vs RCFC Besançon)
                 SC Bel-Abbès            (0-1 aet vs Stade Rennais)
1960: 6th round: AGS Mascara             (1-0 vs Red Star Alger)
                 Red Star Alger          (0-1 vs AGS Mascara)
                 SC Bel-Abbès            (0-6 vs Olympique de Marseille)
                 AS Batna                (0-4 vs FC Grenoble)
                 AS Saint Eugène Alger   (1-5 vs FC Nancy)
      1/32 fin.: AGS Mascara             (0-1 vs AS Cannes)
French Guyanese clubs in the French football structure

Cup

42 entries, 5 wins

CSCC [Club Colonial] (Cayenne)      [10 entries, 2 wins]
entries:  1977/78, 1978/79, 1979/80, 1987/88, 1991/92,
          2000/01, 2006/07, 2007/08, 2008/09, 2009/10
won ties: 1977/78 CA Mantes           0-1 Club Colonial    [aet]          (rd 7)
          2007/08 Bastia CA           1-1 CSCC             [aet, 2-4 pen] (rd 7)

AJ Saint-Georges (Cayenne)           [6 entries, 1 win]
entries:  1966/67, 1975/76, 1980/81, 1996/97, 1997/98,
          1999/00
won tie:  1980/81 AJ Saint-Georges    0-0 Véloce Vannes US [aet, 7-6 pen] (rd 7)

US Matoury                           [6 entries]
entries:  1998/99, 2001/02, 2003/04, 2005/06, 2011/12, 2013/14

ASC Le Geldar (Kourou)               [5 entries, 2 wins]
entries:  1983/84, 1988/89, 2002/03, 2010/11, 2012/13
won ties: 1988/89 ASC Le Geldar       1-1 EAC Chaumont     [aet, 5-4 pen] (rd 8)
                  FC Sens             1-2 ASC Le Geldar                   (rd 9)

ASL Sport Guyanais (Cayenne)         [5 entries]
entries:  1973/74, 1982/83, 1985/86, 1989/90, 1993/94

US Macouria                          [2 entries]
entries:  1995/96, 2004/05

AS Jahouvey Mana                     [2 entries]
entries:  1986/87, 1992/93

USL Montjoly                         [2 entries]
entries:  1981/82, 1984/85

Olympique de Cayenne                 [2 entries]
entries:  1974/75, 1976/77

SC Kouroucien (Kourou)               [1 entry]
entry:    1990/91

US Sinnamary                         [1 entry]
entry:    1994/95
Guadeloupe clubs in the French football structure

Cup

42 entries, 6 wins

Etoile (Morne-à-l'Eau)              [10 entries, 2 wins]
entries:  1977/78, 1982/83, 1984/85, 1988/89, 1992/93,
          1994/95, 1996/97, 2000/01, 2003/04, 2012/13
won ties: 2000/01 AS Muret            0-2 Etoile                          (rd 7)
          2003/04 Etoile              2-2 US Romorantin    [aet, 4-2 pen] (rd 7)

CS Moulien (Moule)                   [8 entries, 2 wins]
entries:  1961/62, 1980/81, 1987/88, 2005/06, 2006/07,
          2007/08, 2010/11, 2013/14
won ties: 1980/81 AAJ Blois           1-2 CS Moulien                      (rd 7)
          2007/08 CS Moulien          0-0 Pacy-sur-Eure    [aet, 4-2 pen] (rd 7)

AS Red Star (Baie-Mahault)           [4 entries, 1 win]
entries:  1974/75, 1979/80, 1991/92, 1993/94
won tie:  1993/94 AS Red Star         1-0 La Roche-sur-Yon VF             (rd 7)

Cygne Noir (Basse-Terre)             [3 entries]
entries:  1972/73, 1981/82, 1983/84

Evolucas (Lamentin)                  [3 entries]
entries:  2004/05, 2008/09, 2011/12

Solidarité Scolaire (Pointe-à-Pitre) [3 entries]
entries:  1986/87, 1990/91, 1999/00

AS Dragon (Gosier)                   [2 entries]
entries:  2001/02, 2002/03

Juventus (Sainte-Anne)               [2 entries]
entries:  1964/65, 1973/74

La Gauloise (Basse-Terre)            [1 entry, 1 win]
entry:    1978/79
won ties: 1978/79 AS Poissy           0-1 La Gauloise                     (rd 7)

Amical Club (Marie-Galante)          [1 entry]
entry:    2009/10

Arsenal Club (Petit-Bourg)           [1 entry]
entry:    1995/96

Equinoxe (Petit-Canal)               [1 entry]
entry:    1971/72

Phare (Petit-Canal)                  [1 entry]
entry:    1997/98

CS Saint-François                    [1 entry]
entry:    1985/86

US Baie-Mahault                      [1 entry]
entry:    1998/99
Martinique clubs in the French football structure

Cup

46 entries, 11 wins

Club Franciscain                    [11 entries, 6 wins]
entries:  1982/83, 1992/93, 1994/95, 1996/97, 1999/00,
          2000/01, 2002/03, 2003/04, 2005/06, 2009/10,
          2013/14
won ties: 1982/83 Club Franciscain    2-1 Montpellier PSC                 (rd 7)
          1992/93 Club Franciscain    2-1 FC Bourges                      (rd 8)
          1994/95 Club Franciscain    2-1 ESA Brive                       (rd 7)
          1996/97 Club Franciscain    2-2 FC Trélissac     [aet, 4-3 pen] (rd 7)
          2002/03 Club Franciscain    2-1 Olympique Noisy-le-Sec          (rd 7)
          2005/06 SCO Angers          0-2 Club Franciscain                (rd 7)

Aiglon du Lamentin                   [4 entries]
entries:  1965/66, 1991/92, 2004/05, 2006/07

Club Colonial (Fort-de-France)       [4 entries]
entries:  1963/64, 1979/80, 1983/84, 2012/13

Golden Star (Fort-de-France)         [3 entries, 1 win]
entries:  1974/75, 1975/76, 1997/98
won tie:  1974/75 Golden Star    1-1, 2-1 US Melun                        (rd 7)

RC Rivière Pilote                    [3 entries]
entries:  1977/78, 1981/82, 2008/09

Samaritaine (Sainte-Marie)           [2 entries, 1 win]
entries:  1976/77, 2007/08
won tie:  2007/08 Sables d'Olonne     0-1 Samaritaine 

JA Trénelle (Fort-de-France)         [2 entries, 1 win]
entries:  1986/87, 1988/89
won tie:  1986/87 JA Trénelle         2-1 EA Guingamp                     (rd 8)

CS Case Pilote                       [2 entries]
entries:  2001/02, 2010/11

Excelsior (Fort-de-France)           [2 entries]
entries:  1984/85, 1990/91

CS Vauclinois                        [2 entries]
entries:  1968/69, 1969/70

Good Luck (Fort-de-France)           [1 entry, 1 win]
entry:    1978/79
won tie:  1978/79 Good Luck           3-1 UES Montmorillon                (rd 7)

Club Peléen (Morne Rouge)            [1 entry, 1 win]
entry:    1980/81
won tie:  1980/81 Club Peléen         1-0 Stade Français                  (rd 7)

Assaut (Saint-Pierre)                [1 entry]
entry:    1985/86

CS Bélimois                          [1 entry]
entry:    2011/12

Eclair (Rivière Salée)               [1 entry]
entry:    1998/99

La Gauloise (Trinité)                [1 entry]
entry:    1993/94

Olympique Marin                      [1 entry]
entry:    1973/74

RC Gros Morne                        [1 entry]
entry:    1987/88

Réal Tartane                         [1 entry]
entry:    1989/90

US Robert (Le Robert)                [1 entry]
entry:    1995/96

Stade Spiritain                      [1 entry]
entry:    1962/63
Mayotte clubs in the French football structure

From 1986 to 2000, clubs from Mayotte were allocated a place in the round of 32 of the Coupe de France Régionale in Reunion (from 1998 to 2000, 2 Mayotte clubs could enter). No Mayotte club ever reached the French Cup itself through this route. Since the 2001/02 season, the winners of the Coupe de France Régionale in Mayotte enter the seventh round of the French Cup directly.

Cup

13 entries

FC M'tsapere                         [3 entries]
entries:  2001/02, 2004/05, 2012/13

Foudre 2000                          [2 entries]
entries:  2007/08, 2008/09

AJ Kani-Keli                         [2 entries]
entries:  2005/06, 2013/14

Pamandzi SC                          [2 entries]
entries:  2002/03, 2003/04

ASC Abeilles                         [1 entry]
entry:    2011/12

ASC Kawéni                           [1 entry]
entry:    2009/10

FC Koropa                            [1 entry]
entry:    2010/11

FCO de Tsingoni                      [1 entry]
entry:    2006/07
Mayotte clubs in the Reunion football structure

From 1986 to 1997, one Mayotte club entered the 1/16 finals of the Coupe de France Régionale in Reunion, the winners of which obtaining entry in the French Cup; from 1998 to 2000, two Mayotte clubs entered the 1/16 finals of this tournament. No Mayotte club ever managed to survive more than one round; below we list all known cases of Mayotte clubs eliminating opposition from Reunion. Since the 2001/02 season, Mayotte clubs can enter the French Cup directly.

Coupe de France Régionale

FC Kani-Bé
won tie:  1998    SS Dynamo           1-2 FC Kani-Bé   

FC M'tsapéré
won tie:  1995    FC M'tsapéré        bt  US Chaudron

Miracle du Sud 
won tie:  2000    SS Dynamo           lt  Miracle du Sud 
Moroccan clubs in the French football structure

In addition to the two clubs listed below, RAC Casablanca (1954/55) and US Marocaine (1955/56) entered the 5th round (the first inter-ligue stage) once, but both were eliminated by other African clubs (RAC by FC Blida and USM by Gallia Sports Alger).

Cup

1955: 6th round: MAS Fès                 (0-9 vs RSO Audonien)
1956: 6th round: WAC Casablanca          (1-0 aet vs RCFC Besançon)
      1/32 fin.: WAC Casablanca          (1-2 aet vs AS Saint Etienne)
New Caledonian clubs in the French football structure

Cup

25 entries, 1 win

AS Magenta                           [8 entries, 1 win]
entries:  1994/95, 2000/01, 2001/02, 2002/03, 2003/04,
          2004/05, 2005/06, 2010/11
won tie:  2010/11 AS Magenta          1-1 USL Dunkerque    [aet, 5-4 pen] (rd 7)

CA Saint-Louis                       [4 entries]
entries:  1983/84, 1986/87, 1995/96, 1996/97

JS Traput (Lifou)                    [3 entries]
entries:  1997/98, 1998/99, 1999/00

AS Lössi                             [2 entries]
entries:  2007/08, 2012/13

AS Mont-Dore                         [2 entries]
entries:  2008/09, 2009/10

JS Baco                              [1 entry]
entry:    2006/07

FC Gaïtcha                           [1 entry]
entry:    2011/12

USL Gélima (Canala)                  [1 entry]
entry:    1982/83

Hienghčne Sport                      [1 entry]
entry:    2013/14

AS Le Nickel (Nouméa)                [1 entry]
entry:    1975/76

JS Vallée du Tir (Nouméa)            [1 entry]
entry:    1966/67
Reunion clubs in the French football structure

Cup

48 entries, 14 wins

CS Saint-Denis                       [7 entries, 1 win]
entries:  1975/76, 1980/81, 1982/83, 1983/84, 1985/86,
          1987/88, 1990/91
won tie:  1975/76 CS Saint-Denis      2-1 AS Libourne                     (rd 7)

US Bénédictine (Saint-Benoît)        [6 entries]
entries:  1965/66, 1966/67, 1968/69, 1969/70, 1972/73, 
          1981/82

SS Saint-Louisienne                  [5 entries, 4 wins]
entries:  1994/95, 1995/96, 1996/97, 1997/98, 2002/03
won ties: 1994/95 SA Epinal           1-3 SS Saint-Louisienne             (rd 7)
                  SS Saint-Louisienne 1-1 Chamois Niortais [aet, 4-2 pen] (rd 8)
          1995/96 SS Saint-Louisienne 1-0 La Roche-sur-Yon VF             (rd 7)
          1997/98 SS Saint-Louisienne 2-1 La Roche-sur-Yon VF             (rd 7)

JS Saint-Pierroise                   [5 entries, 2 wins]
entries:  1964/65, 1971/72, 1976/77, 1977/78, 1989/90
won ties: 1977/78 JS Saint-Pierroise  3-1 FC Yonnais                      (rd 7)
          1989/90 JS Saint-Pierroise  1-1 Le Mans UC 72    [aet]          (rd 8)

US Stade Tamponnaise (Le Tampon)     [5 entries, 1 win]
entries:  1992/93, 1998/99, 2003/04, 2006/07, 2011/12
won tie:  2006/07 Schiltigheim        0-7 US Stade Tamponnaise            (rd 7)

AS Excelsior (Saint-Joseph)          [3 entries. 1 win]
entries:  1974/75, 2001/02, 2009/10
won tie:  2009/10 AS Excelsior        1-0 Quimper Cornouaille FC

SS Jeanne d'Arc (Le Port)            [2 entries, 2 wins]
entries:  1999/00, 2008/09
won ties: 2008/09 Saint-Louis Neuweg  0-1 SS Jeanne d'Arc                 (rd 7)
                  SS Jeanne d'Arc     3-2 SC Feignies                     (rd 8)

US Sainte-Marie                      [2 entries, 1 win]
entries:  2007/08, 2013/14
won tie:  2013/14 US Sainte-Marie     2-0 Paris FC                        (rd 7)

FC Ouest Savanna (Saint-Paul)        [2 entries]
entries:  1984/85, 1988/89

Saint-Pauloise FC                    [2 entries]
entries:  2010/11, 2012/13

AS Chaudron                          [1 entry, 1 win] 
entry:    2005/06
won tie:  2005/06 AS Chaudron         2-1 Vauban Strabourg [aet]          (rd 7)

US Possession                        [1 entry, 1 win]
entry:    1993/94
won tie:  1993/94 US Possession       2-1 SCO Roubaix      [aet]          (rd 7)

SS Gauloise (Bras-Panon)             [1 entry]
entry:    1991/92

AS Marsouins (Saint-Leu)             [1 entry]
entry:    2000/01

SS Patriote (Saint-Denis)            [1 entry]
entry:    1973/74

Saint-Denis FC                       [1 entry]
entry:    2004/05

SS Saint-Pauloise                    [1 entry]
entry:    1986/87

US Saint-Joseph                      [1 entry]
entry:    1978/79

USSA Léopards (Sainte-Anne)          [1 entry]
entry:    1979/80
Tahitian clubs in the French football structure

37 entries, 4 wins

AS Pirae                            [10 entries]
entries:  1989/90, 1990/91, 1992/93, 1993/94, 1994/95,
          1996/97, 1998/99, 1999/00, 2000/01, 2002/03

AS Central Sport (Papeete)           [9 entries, 2 wins]
entries:  1974/75, 1976/77, 1977/78, 1978/79, 1979/80,
          1981/82, 1982/83, 1985/86, 1988/89
won ties: 1978/79 AS Central Sport    3-0 Arago Orléans                   (rd 7)
          1981/82 AS Central Sport    4-2 AS Béziers       [aet]          (rd 7)

AS Dragon (Papeete)                  [5 entries, 1 win]
entries:  1997/98, 2001/02, 2004/05, 2010/11, 2013/14
won tie:  2001/02 AS Dragon           2-1 FC Rouen                        (rd 7)

AS Tefana                            [5 entries, 1 win]
entries:  2006/07, 2007/08, 2008/09, 2011/12, 2012/13
won tie:  2008/09 SR Colmar           0-0 AS Tefana        [aet, 2-4 pen] (rd 7)

AS Manu Ura                          [3 entries]
entries:  2003/04, 2005/06, 2009/10

AS Vénus (Mahina)                    [2 entries]
entries:  1991/92, 1995/96

JS Arue                              [1 entry]
entry:    1980/81

AS Jeunes Tahitiens (Papeete)        [1 entry]
entry:    1987/88

AS Postes (Papeete)                  [1 entry]
entry:    1984/85
Tunisian clubs in the French football structure

In addition to the two clubs listed below, Stade Tunisien (1955/56) entered the 5th round (the first inter-ligue stage) once, but they were eliminated by another African club (SC Bel-Abbès).

Cup

1955: 6th round: CS Hammam Lif           (1-3 vs Havre AC)
1956: 6th round: Espérance ST            (2-2, 0-4 vs RSO Audonien)

Portugal

Angola | Cape Verde | Guinea Bissau | Mozambique

Between 1957 and independence, the Portuguese colonies in Africa were represented in the Portuguese Cup. This started in the 1957/58 season, when the champions of Angola and Mozambique entered an 'extra' semifinal against the winners (Benfica and Porto) of the cup semifinals in Portugal itself. Both lost heavily, but from then on clubs from the colonies had places reserved for them in the later stages of the Portuguese domestic cup (the quarterfinals from 1958/59 to 1966/67, the round of 16 from 1967/68 to 1970/71 and the round of 32 from 1971/72 until independence in the mid-seventies). Only once, a club from the colonies, Independente from Porto Alexandre (currently Tômbwa) in Angola managed to eliminate a team from Portugal itself.

Angolan clubs in the Portuguese football structure

In 1957/58, clubs from Angola and Mozambique obtained spots in an 'extra semifinal' round of the Portuguese cup, playing against the winners of the 'proper' semifinals, Porto and Benfica. Starting from 1958/59, one spot in the quarterfinals of the Portuguese cup was reserved for a representative from Mozambique (presumably after a playoff against an Angolan club, but the Mozambican clubs seem to have qualified each time). Starting from 1967/68, one spot in the round of 16 (1/8 finals) of the Portuguese cup was reserved for a representative from Angola. In the 1970/71 edition, Independente won their first tie, 1-0 against União Coimbra. This is the only ever success in a Portuguese cup tie by any team from Portugal's former African colonies. From 1971/72 on, Angolan teams entered one round earlier, in the round of 32 (1/16 finals). Angolan clubs, like those from the other African colonies, did not enter anymore after the 1973/74 season (places were still reserved for them in the following two seasons).

City name correspondences: 
colonial         current
Nova Lisboa      Huambo
Porto Alexandre  Tômbwa

Cup

1958: semifinal: Ferroviário Luanda      (2-6, 1-11 vs Benfica)
1968:   Angola did not enter club
1969: 1/8 final: Atlético Luanda         (0-4, 2-3 vs Benfica)
1970: 1/8 final: Independente P.A.       (0-4, 1-5 vs União Tomar)
1971: quarterf.: Independente P.A.       (0-6, 0-2 vs Benfica)
1972: 1/16 fin.: Independente P.A.       (1-2 vs Tirsense)
1973: 1/16 fin.: Benfica Nova Lisboa     (1-2 vs Atlético Lisboa)
1974: 1/16 fin.: FC do Moxico Luena      (0-6 vs CUF Barreiro)
NB: P.A. = Porto Alexandre
Cape Verdian clubs in the Portuguese football structure

Starting from 1970/71, one spot in the round of 16 (1/8 finals) of the Portuguese cup was reserved for (apparently) the winners of a playoff between a representative from Cape Verde (Cabo Verde) and one from Guinea Bissau. Possibly such a playoff regulation had existed before, but only in 1970/71 a club from Cape Verde made it into the main tournament, and immediately suffered the record defeat by any club from Portugal's former African colonies, which did not enter anymore after the 1973/74 season (places were still reserved for them in the following two seasons).

Cup

1971: 1/8 final: Mindelense              (0-21 vs Sporting)
Guinea Bissau clubs in the Portuguese football structure

Starting from 1964/65, one spot in the round of 16 (1/8 finals) of the Portuguese cup was reserved for a representative from Guinea Bissau (Guiné Bissau). From 1970/71 (but possibly already before), the representatives of Guinea Bissau apparently first had to play off against a club from Cape Verde (Cabo Verde) for this spot (only in 1970/71, Guinea Bissau did not qualify). From 1971/72 on, this club entered one round earlier, in the round of 32 (1/16 finals). One club from the region won a match, a 1-0 win by Tenis over Braga in the return leg of their 1/8 final tie in 1969/70, after suffering a 0-3 defeat in the first leg. It was the first ever win from a club from Portugal's former African colonies, which did not enter anymore after the 1973/74 season (places were still reserved for them in the following two seasons).

Cup

1965: 1/8 final: União Bissau            (0-4, 2-3 vs Olhanense)
1966:   Guinea Bissau did not enter club
1967: 1/8 final: Tenis Bissau            (0-6, 3-5 vs Beira-Mar)
1968:   Guinea Bissau did not enter club
1969: 1/8 final: União Bissau            (1-5, 0-12 vs Sporting)
1970: 1/8 final: Tenis Bissau            (0-3, 1-0 vs Braga)
1972: 1/16 fin.: Sporting Clube Bissau   (0-2 vs Sintrense)
1973: 1/16 fin.: União Bissau            (0-6 vs Farense)
1974: 1/16 fin.: Sporting Clube Bissau   (0-1 vs Oriental Lisboa)
Mozambican clubs in the Portuguese football structure

In 1957/58, clubs from Angola and Mozambique (Moçambique) obtained spots in an 'extra semifinal' round of the Portuguese cup, playing against the winners of the 'proper' semifinals, Porto and Benfica. Starting from 1958/59, one spot in the quarterfinals of the Portuguese cup was reserved for a representative from Mozambique (presumably after a playoff against an Angolan club, but the Mozambican clubs seem to have qualified each time); another was reserved for a club from the Azores (Açores), which are still part of Portugal, and whose clubs have meanwhile gained access to Portugal's top division. From 1964/65 on, the Mozambican club entered one round earlier, in the round of 16 (1/8 finals); from 1971/72 on, in the round of 32 (1/16 finals). In total, Mozambican clubs played 22 matches in the Portuguese cup, more than those from any other of Portugal's former African colonies (which did not enter anymore after the 1973/74 season, although places were still reserved for them in the following two seasons), and managed only one draw (after losing the first leg of the tie), and that not against a club from the mainland but a representative from the Azores.

City name correspondences: 
colonial         current
Lourenço Marques Maputo
Vila Pery        Chimoio

Cup

1958: semifinal: Desportivo L.Marques    (2-6, 1-9 vs Porto)
1959: quarterf.: Ferroviário L.Marques   (0-9, 0-7 vs Porto)
1960: quarterf.: Sporting Nampula(?)     (0-6, 0-3 vs Belenenses)
1961: quarterf.: Sporting L.Marques      (1-4, 1-4 vs Belenenses)
1962: quarterf.: Ferroviário L.Marques   (1-7, 1-7 vs Benfica)
1963: quarterf.: Sporting L.Marques      (1-3, 1-4 vs Sporting)
1964: quarterf.: Ferroviário L.Marques   (1-3, 2-2 vs Lusitânia (Açores))
1965:   Mozambique did not enter club
1966:   Mozambique did not enter club
1967:   Mozambique did not enter club
1968:   Mozambique did not enter club
1969: 1/8 final: Ferroviário L.Marques   (1-4, 0-1 vs Académica Coimbra)
1970: 1/8 final: Textafrica Vila Pery    (2-6, 0-3 vs Belenenses)
1971: 1/8 final: Ferroviário L.Marques   (1-4 vs Porto)
1972: 1/16 fin.: Textafrica Vila Pery    (1-3 vs Leixões)
1973: 1/16 fin.: Ferroviário L.Marques   (1-3 vs CUF Barreiro)
1974: 1/16 fin.: Textafrica Vila Pery    (0-1 vs Atlético Lisboa)

Spain

Moroccan clubs in the Spanish football structure

The northernmost regions of the current Morocco were a Spanish protectorate until 1956, when it merged with the French Protectorate to found the Kingdom of Morocco. Note that the clubs from the cities of Ceuta and Melilla, which still belong to Spain, are not included here.

Apart from the one-season appearance of Atlético Tetuán in the Primera División, who also once reached the quarterfinals of the Spanish cup, two other clubs from the region played at the second Spanish level: UD España from Tánger (3 seasons, from 1953/54 to 1955/56, with their best finish 4th in the southern group 1954/55) and EHA Tánger (in 1939/40 only; EHA denoted Escuela Hispano Árabe; the club was dissolved in 1943); in 1956, UD España merged into UD España de Algeciras, while Atlético Tetuán split into a Moroccan side (Moghreb Tétouan, champions of Morocco 2011/12) and a Spanish one (merging with SD Ceuta into Atlético Ceuta). Atlético Tetuán had first reached the second level in 1949, and gained promotion to the top flight in their second ever season in the Segunda División; after their immediately relegation back to the second level, they twice reached the promotion/relegation playoffs, in 1953 and 1955, but failed to return (by only 1 point in 1953).

Other clubs from the region to have featured in the third tier Tercera División (distributed into a varying number of regional groups) include: Patronato Deportivo Larache (renamed Larache CF in 1947) from the town currently called El-Araïch, who played at the third level for 10 seasons (from 1945/46 to 1951/52 and from 1953/54 to 1955/56), Español de Tetuán (6 seasons from 1950/51 to 1955/56), UD Sevillana de Tánger (also known as Unión Tangerina; 4 seasons from 1952/53 to 1955/56), Moghreb Al-Aksa de Tanger (3 seasons from 1949/50 to 1951/52, when like Larache CF they withdrew during the season), SD Villa Nador, CD Alcázar de Alcazarquivir, UD Pescadores Villasanjurjo (all 2 seasons 1954/55 and 1955/56; Alcazarquivir is nowadays known as Qsar al-Kabir (or Ksar-el-Kebir) and Villasanjurjo (or Villa Sanjurjo) as Al-Hoceima) and Alcazaba de Tánger (in 1955/56 only). Larache CF were dissolved in 1956 and a new club Club Chabab Larache was founded and admitted to the second division of Morroco for 1956/57; it played in the Moroccan first division for two seasons (1959/60, finishing 10th, and 1960/61, finishing 13th and suffering relegation). Most clubs from Tanger were also dissolved in 1956; only Widad Juventud de Tanger (founded in 1950 and never active above the fourth league level during the Spanish era) survived; in 1983, they were, meanwhile renamed Nahda (or Renaissance) de Tanger, among the clubs merging into Ittihad Riadi de Tanger, who were first promoted to the Moroccan top level in 1987, finishing runners-up in 1989/90.

Nothing is known about clubs from Sidi Ifni playing within the Spanish football structure.

Championship

Atlético Tetuán (1 top level season)
1951/52 16.Atlético Tetuán         30  7  5 18  51-85  19

Cup

1943: 1/16 fin.: Atlético Tetuán         (3-1, 0-3 vs Betis)
1951: quarterf.: Atlético Tetuán         (1-3, 1-4 vs Barcelona)

Russia

Poland | Ukraine

The Soviet Union 'inherited' most of its territory from the old Russian Empire, as assembled by the tsars. There were not many football competitions in this Empire extending beyond city boundaries, but in 1912 and 1913, national championships for city selections were played which involved a number of Ukrainian teams as well as a Polish one (which withdrew without playing). Odessa (Odesa in Ukrainian) even won the 1913 final but had their title taken away from them for playing with 4 foreigners (rather than the allowed 3); the title was not awarded. Note that the tournament was played in knock-out style.

Polish teams in the Russian football structure

Łódź entered the northern group of the 1913 city championship, which had 4 participants; they withdrew before playing their first round match against Sankt Peterburg.

City Selection Championship

1913: quarterf.: Łódź                    (forfeit vs Sankt Peterburg)
Ukrainian teams in the Russian football structure

Various Ukrainian cities entered the 1912 and 1913 Russian championships for city selections. Odessa (Odesa in Ukrainian) even won the 1913 final but had their title taken away from them for playing with 4 foreigners (rather than the allowed 3); the title was not awarded. Note that the tournament was played in knock-out style. The 1913 championship was split in a northern and a southern group, whose winners met in the final; all 7 Ukrainian participants played in the southern group (together with Rostov, who lost 1-5 to Yusovka (currently Donetsk) in the first round).

City Selection Championship

1912: semifinal: Odessa                  (withdrew)
1912: quarterf.: Kiev                    (forfeit vs Sankt Peterburg)
1912: quarterf.: Kharkov                 (1-6 vs Moskva)
1913: finalists: Odessa                  (4-2 vs Sankt Peterburg)
      NB: title not awarded as Odessa fielded too many foreigners
1913: semifinal: Kharkov                 (0-2 vs Odessa)
1913: quarterf.: Kherson                 (0-10 vs Odessa)
1913: quarterf.: Yusovka                 (1-2 vs Kharkov)
1913: 1/8 final: Nikolaev                (2-3 vs Odessa)
1913: 1/8 final: Kiev                    (forfeit vs Kharkov)
1913: 1/8 final: Sevastopol              (forfeit vs Kherson)

Country Splits and Unifications

Ireland | Cyprus | Germany | Soviet Union | Georgia | Czechoslovakia | Romania | Yugoslavia | South Africa | Sudan | Tanzania | Pakistan | Malaysia | Korea | Vietnam | Yemen | United Arab Republic | British Palestine | Comoros | Netherlands Antilles | additional remarks on Africa

Over the years, many countries in the world have split into various parts, while others have managed to merge or reunify. The sudden changes in the map of Europe following the collapse of communist rule were probably the most spectacular, but various other examples exist in other areas and eras.

A case not included in this section is that of the Habsburg Empire, which disintegrated as a consequence of the First World War. The reason is that in footballing terms, the structure contained two countries: Austria and Hungary, who both obtained FIFA membership upon its creation. (The desire of the third main entity, Bohemia, which politically fell under Austria, to obtain independent FIFA membership led to the first major political problems within the new organisation.) The corresponding changes to the Austrian and Hungarian football structures are therefore included in the section on border moves (see Austria and Hungary).

The first two cases discussed here are islands messed up under British rule (a curse from which also Palestine and the Indian subcontinent did not recover).

Ireland

Irish Republic clubs in the all-Irish football structure

Up to and including the 1919/20 season, the Irish football competition (organised by the IFA, the Irish FA) theoretically encompassed the entire island, though the league was dominated by Belfast clubs. After an independence declaration in 1919, the Irish Free State was officially recognised as a separate British dominion in 1922; only in 1949 the United Kingdom recognised the independence of the Irish Republic declared at the end of 1948. In 1920, Bohemians (who had just been relegated) and Shelbourne left the IFA league (as did Belfast Celtic) due to political unrest. Bohemians and Shelbourne entered the regional Leinster League before joining the newly founded FA of Ireland and its competitions in 1921.
Three Dublin clubs played at the top level prior to 1920, and 4 cup tournaments were won by Dublin clubs, 3 by Shelbourne and 1 by Bohemians; 2 finals were all-Dublin affairs.

Note that in this section only the period until 1920 is discussed, and not the adventures of Derry City half a century later; for those see the section on roving clubs (which also includes a note on Belfast junior club side Alton United).

Also note that we do not separately discuss the fortunes of clubs from Belfast and other towns currently in 'Northern Ireland' within the all-Irish structure prior to 1920, as they clearly dominated proceedings and the organising football association (the Irish FA, as opposed to the FA of Ireland for the current republic) remained the same; FIFA (and UEFA, who were founded well after the Irish split) follow the same procedure, although that argument is not decisive here (see e.g. the Soviet Union and Yugoslavia).

Championship

Note: from 1915/16 to 1918/19 no official competition was organised;
      a war-time championship not involving Dublin sides did take place.

Three Dublin clubs played at the highest league level prior to 1921:

Bohemians (13 top level seasons)
1902/03  7.Bohemians               14  3  3  8  22-36   9
1903/04  6.Bohemians               14  4  3  7  24-33  11
1904/05  8.Bohemians               14  2  2 10  15-26   6
1905/06  5.Bohemians               14  5  2  7  17-20  12
1906/07  5.Bohemians               14  4  5  5  19-22  13
1907/08  8.Bohemians               14  2  2 10  13-31   6
1908/09  5.Bohemians               12  6  1  5  27-24  13
1909/10  6.Bohemians               14  4  3  7  20-31  11
1910/11  8.Bohemians               14  1  4  9  14-25   6
1912/13  6.Bohemians               18  8  2  8  31-28  18
1913/14  7.Bohemians               14  2  2 10  19-36   6
1914/15  8.Bohemians               14  0  1 13  10-45   1
1919/20  8.Bohemians               14  2  2 10   7-38   6

Shelbourne (12 top level seasons)
1904/05  6.Shelbourne              14  5  3  6  15-17  13
1905/06  6.Shelbourne              14  5  2  7  16-18  12
1906/07  2.Shelbourne              14  8  3  3  27-21  19
1907/08  5.Shelbourne              14  6  2  6  22-17  14
1908/09  3.Shelbourne              14  7  0  7  20-20  14
1909/10  8.Shelbourne              14  2  7  5  15-24  11
1910/11  6.Shelbourne              14  3  4  7  15-31  10
1911/12  6.Shelbourne              14  2  3  9  12-33   7
1912/13  8.Shelbourne              18  7  4  7  20-23  18
1913/14  5.Shelbourne              14  6  2  6  16-10  14
1914/15  5.Shelbourne              14  6  3  5  17-12  15
1919/20  4.Shelbourne              14  3  7  4  16-21  13

Tritonville (1 top level season)
1912/13 10.Tritonville             18  2  1 15  27-55   5

Cup

NB: unless stated otherwise, all clubs based in the current Republic
    of Ireland were from Dublin; Black Watch Regiment and Sherwood
    Foresters were British military teams without roots in the local
    community.

1886: semifinal: Dublin University       (0-4 vs Distillery)
1890: semifinal: Dublin Association      (2-3 vs Cliftonville)
1892: finalists: Black Watch Regiment    (0-7 vs Linfield)
      NB: Black Watch Regiment were based in Limerick
1895: finalists: Bohemians               (1-10 vs Linfield)
1897: finalists: Sherwood Foresters      (1-3 vs Cliftonville)
      NB: Sherwood Foresters were based in Kildare
1898: semifinal: Bohemians               (0-1 vs St. Columbia's Hall Celtic)
1899: semifinal: Bohemians               (2-4 vs Linfield)
1900: finalists: Bohemians               (1-2 vs Cliftonville)
1901: finalists: Freebooters             (0-1 vs Cliftonville)
1902: semifinal: Bohemians               (0-2 vs Linfield)
      semifinal: Richmond Rovers         (3-5 vs Distillery)
1903: finalists: Bohemians               (1-3 vs Distillery)
1905: finalists: Shelbourne              (0-3 vs Distillery)
1906: winners:   Shelbourne              (2-0 vs Belfast Celtic)
      semifinal: Bohemians               (0-2 vs Belfast Celtic)
1907: finalists: Shelbourne              (0-0, 0-1 vs Cliftonville)
1908: winners:   Bohemians               (0-0, 3-1 vs Shelbourne)
      finalists: Shelbourne              (0-0, 1-3 vs Bohemians)
1909: finalists: Bohemians               (0-0, 1-2 vs Cliftonville)
1910: semifinal: Bohemians               (0-3 vs Cliftonville)
1911: winners:   Shelbourne              (2-1 vs Bohemians)
      finalists: Bohemians               (1-2 vs Shelbourne)
1912: semifinal: Shelbourne              (withdrew)
      NB: three semifinalists, including Shelbourne, withdrew from
          the IFA, leaving Linfield as only remaining participants
          (and thereby winners by default)
1913: semifinal: Tritonville             (1-4 vs Linfield)
1914: semifinal: Shelbourne              (1-1, 1-1, 0-0, 1-2 vs Glentoran)
1915: semifinal: Shelbourne              (0-0, 0-1 vs Belfast Celtic)
1916: semifinal: Bohemians               (2-4 vs Glentoran)
1917: semifinal: Bohemians               (2-4 vs Belfast Celtic)
1919: semifinal: Shelbourne              (0-0 aet, 1-2 vs Linfield)
1920: winners:   Shelbourne              (walkover)
      NB: the semifinal replay between Belfast Celtic and Glentoran
          was abandoned after 70 minutes following crowd disturbances
          including Celtic fans firing into the Glentoran followers,
          injuring some; Celtic were disqualified, but after their
          protest on an ineligible player (in fact the goal keeper)
          of Glentoran, so were their opponents and Shelbourne won 
          the cup final by walkover. 

City Cup

This was a league style tournament, first held in 1892/93, whose matches 
were mostly played in Belfast, though teams from Londonderry and Dublin 
were admitted starting from the 1905/06 season.  Shelbourne and Bohemians
both participated in various seasons, with one notable success: 

1908/09  1.Shelbourne              10  7  1  2  22-13  15

Cyprus

The island was de facto split between a Greek and a Turkish part after the 1974 invasion by Turkish troops, but problems between the two ethnic groups went back a long time and had already led to the withdrawal of Turkish side Çetin Kaya in 1955 (and the abandonment or cancellation of various championships in the two decades in between). Çetin Kaya, known as LTSK until 1951, had been a successful club in the early fifties, winning one championship, appearing in three consecutive cup finals (of which they won two), and winning three of the first four Super Cups organised on the island. Since 1955 they play in a separate league for Turkish clubs, from which they have never been relegated; they are both its record champions (14 titles up to and including 2013) and cup winners (17 trophies).

Note that we do not separately discuss the fortunes of the clubs of the internationally recognised part of the island in the all-Cypriot structure (due to their dominance before the split in the 1950s and the fact that the football association remained the same), and keep in mind that some of the currently 'Greek' Cypriot clubs were based in towns now in Northern Cyprus; these were forced to move to new homes after the Turkish invasion. Some of the clubs involved were Anórthosis from Ammóchostos/Gazimağusa, Néa Salamína from Salamís (near Ammóchostos) and ASIL from Lysi/Akdoğan, who all moved to Lárnaka/Larnaka, Digenís Akrítas who moved from Mórfou/Güzelyurt to Lemesós/Leymosun, Dóxa who moved from Katokopiá/Zümrütköy to nearby Peristeróna and Ethnikós Ássias who moved from Ássia/Paşaköy to Stróvolos (the largest municipality of the capital Lefkosía/Lefkoşa). Likewise various 'Turkish' clubs originally were based in the southern part of the island: Türk Ocağı Limasol moved from Leymosun/Lemesós to Girne/Kerýnia, Çanakkale from Çanakkale/Kantoú to Gazimağusa/Ammóchostos and Yalova from Yalova/Episkopí to Yeni Bostancı/Páno Zódia.

The champions of 'Greek' Cyprus were invited to compete for a season in the Greek league during the military dictatorship in Greece.

Northern Cypriot clubs in the all-Cypriot football structure

LTSK (renamed Çetin Kaya in 1951) played in all official editions of the Cypriot championship between 1934/35 (the first ever such edition) and 1954/55, after having entered the unofficial 1933/34 edition as well. They became one of the powerhouses of Cypriot football in the first half of the fifties, before withdrawing to a separate Turkish league in the wake of the guerrilla actions (directed against British rule) by the Greek EOKA. Other Turkish clubs to have played in the Cypriot Cup until 1955 are Demirspor, Doğan Birliği, Gençlik Gücü and Turkish Aviation.

Championship

LTSK/Çetin Kaya
top-4 finishes (in 18 top level seasons - all between 1934 and 1955)
1934/35  2.LTSK                    13  6  4  3  31-12  16
1935/36  3.LTSK                    14  9  1  4  28-21  19
1936/37  3.LTSK                    12  5  5  2  29-16  15
1937/38  3.LTSK                     4  2  1  1   8-10   5
1950/51  1.Çetin Kaya              14  8  4  2  36-26  20
1951/52  3.Çetin Kaya              14  8  1  5  31-25  17
1952/53  4.Çetin Kaya              14  6  3  5  27-23  15
1953/54  4.Çetin Kaya              16  7  3  6  28-26  17
1954/55  4.Çetin Kaya              18  8  4  6  30-24  20
    
Cup

1935: semifinal: LTSK                    (0-1 vs APÓEL)
1936: finalists: LTSK                    (1-4 vs Trast)
1937: semifinal: LTSK                    (1-3 vs APÓEL)
1939: semifinal: LTSK                    (0-2 vs AÉL)
1940: semifinal: LTSK                    (2-5 vs Pezoporikós)
1945: quarterf.: LTSK                    (0-1 vs AÉL)
1946: quarterf.: LTSK                    (0-9 vs APÓEL)
1947: quarterf.: LTSK                    (0-3 vs Anórthosis)
1948: semifinal: LTSK                    (1-8 vs APÓEL)
1949: semifinal: LTSK                    (1-5 vs Anórthosis)
1950: semifinal: LTSK                    (1-3 vs ÉPA)
1951: quarterf.: Çetin Kaya              (2-5 vs ÉPA)
1952: winners:   Çetin Kaya              (4-1 vs Pezoporikós)
1953: finalists: Çetin Kaya              (1-2 vs ÉPA)
1954: winners:   Çetin Kaya              (2-1 vs Pezoporikós)
      quarterf.: Demirspor               (5-8 vs Salamína)
1955: semifinal: Çetin Kaya              (1-4 vs Pezoporikós)

Super Cup

1951: winners:   Çetin Kaya              (5-1 vs APÓEL)
1952: winners:   Çetin Kaya              (2-1 vs APÓEL)
1954: winners:   Çetin Kaya              (2-1 vs Pezoporikós)

Germany

East Germany | Saar

The shape of Germany underwent many changes since the invention of football and the foundation of the DFB, last on October 3, 1990, when the German Democratic Republic (to which we will refer as East Germany below) joined the Federal Republic of Germany (we will use West Germany to describe the area of which this entity consisted from 1957 (when the Saarland, to be referred to as Saar hereafter, joined the Federal Republic; the area had been under French occupation and then sovereignty since the end of World War II) until 1990); we take West Germany to include West-Berlin although formally it had a special status (see also below).

We here look at some clubs from the Saar and East Germany who made an impact in (West) Germany since joining it, or in German football history prior to World War II. We will not separately look at the performances of clubs from West Germany in the current Germany or the pre-WWII one, as the football federation (DFB) has been the same in all three entities, in spite of its varying borders.

A special case is that of Berlin. After World War II, the city was split in 4 zones (as was the rest of the country), controlled by the United States of America, the United Kingdom, France and the Soviet Union respectively. A regional league (the Oberliga Berlin, technically one of the many regional top level leagues in the country) started in 1946 encompassing clubs from the entire city, and when a national championship was first organised after the war in the summer of 1948, the Berlin champions, Union Oberschöneweide, who resided in the Soviet zone of the city, also entered, losing 0-7 at home to FC Sankt Pauli in the quarterfinals. Note that the 1947/48 champions of the Ostzone, SG Planitz, who had been drawn to play 1.FC Nürnberg in the quarterfinals, forfeited the match for political reasons, although the formal establishment of the German Democratic Republic did not happen until October 1949.

This situation continued until the summer of 1950, when the clubs residing in the Soviet section of the city (corresponding to what became known as Ost-Berlin) were forced to enter the East German league structure. This included two clubs (Union Oberschöneweide and VfB Pankow) which had played in the all-Berlin top level of 1949/50, and one (SC Lichtenberg 47, formerly Lichtenberg-Nord) which had just been promoted to the Oberliga, in which they had earlier played for two seasons, for 1950/51. These three clubs all entered the top level of East Germany (Oberliga der demokratischen Sportbewegung) in 1950/51 and finished 15th (Oberschöneweide), 17th (Pankow) and 18th (Lichtenberg) among the 18 clubs. Union Oberschöneweide had been weakened by the loss of their best players: as Berlin runners-up they had qualified for the first round of the (West) German championship playoff but the East German sports authorities forbade them the trip to Kiel, where they were to face Hamburger SV. The players went anyway, and remained in West Germany after the match, founding a new club, SC Union 06 Berlin, which kept the place in the Oberliga of West-Berlin, which they won again in 1952/53 after being runners-up in 1950/51 and 1951/52. The performances of clubs from Ost-Berlin in the Oberliga Berlin 1946-1950 are listed as a special case under the East German section.

East German clubs in the German football structure
Championship (Deutsche Meisterschaft)

1903: winners:   VfB Leipzig             (7-2 vs DFC Prag)
1906: winners:   VfB Leipzig             (2-1 vs 1.FC Pforzheim)
1911: finalists: VfB Leipzig             (1-3 vs Viktoria 89 Berlin)
1914: finalists: VfB Leipzig             (2-3 vs SpVgg Fürth)
1923: finalists: Union Oberschöneweide   (0-3 vs Hamburger SV)
1940: finalists: Dresdner SC             (0-1 vs Schalke 04)
1943: winners:   Dresdner SC             (3-0 vs FV Saarbrücken)
1944: winners:   Dresdner SC             (4-0 vs LSV Groß Hamburg)

Championship (Oberliga Berlin 1946-1950)

Four clubs from Ost-Berlin played in the Oberliga Berlin between 
1946 and 1950:

Union Oberschöneweide (3 top level seasons)
1947/48  1.Union Oberschöneweide   22 16  3  3  68-21  35
1948: quarterf.: Union Oberschöneweide   (0-7 vs FC Sankt Pauli)
1948/49  3.Union Oberschöneweide   22 13  5  4  52-28  31
1949/50  2.Union Oberschöneweide   22 15  2  5  69-31  32
1950: 1/8 final: Union Oberschöneweide   (0-7 vs Hamburger SV)

VfB Pankow (3 top level seasons)
1947/48  8.VfB Pankow              22  7  6  9  26-35  20
1948/49  7.VfB Pankow              22  5  8  9  34-47  18
1949/50  8.VfB Pankow              22  8  2 12  32-51  18

SG Köpenick (3 top level seasons)
1946/47  8.SG Köpenick             22  8  4 10  46-41  20
1947/48  9.SG Köpenick             22  6  5 11  36-58  17
1948/49 10.SG Köpenick             22  5  5 12  32-41  15

SG Lichtenberg-Nord/SC Lichtenberg 47 (2 top level seasons)
1946/47 10.SG Lichtenberg-Nord     22  8  3 11  46-51  19
1948/49 12.SC Lichtenberg 47       22  4  1 17  17-55   9

Championship (Bundesliga)

Four East German clubs played in the Bundesliga since 1990:

Hansa Rostock (12 top level seasons)
1991/92 18.Hansa Rostock           38 10 11 17  43-55  31
1995/96  6.Hansa Rostock           34 13 10 11  47-43  49
1996/97 14.Hansa Rostock           34 11  7 16  35-46  40
1997/98  6.Hansa Rostock           34 14  9 11  54-46  51
1998/99 13.Hansa Rostock           34  9 11 14  49-58  38
1999/00 15.Hansa Rostock           34  8 14 12  44-60  38
2000/01 12.Hansa Rostock           34 12  7 15  34-47  43
2001/02 14.Hansa Rostock           34  9  7 18  35-54  34
2002/03 13.Hansa Rostock           34 11  8 15  35-41  41
2003/04  9.Hansa Rostock           34 12  8 14  55-54  44
2004/05 17.Hansa Rostock           34  7  9 18  31-65  30
2007/08 17.Hansa Rostock           34  8  6 20  30-52  30  

Energie Cottbus (6 top level seasons)
2000/01 14.Energie Cottbus         34 12  3 19  38-52  39
2001/02 13.Energie Cottbus         34  9  8 17  36-60  35
2002/03 18.Energie Cottbus         34  7  9 18  34-64  30
2006/07 13.Energie Cottbus         34 11  8 15  38-49  41
2007/08 14.Energie Cottbus         34  9  9 16  35-56  36
2008/09 16.Energie Cottbus         34  8  6 20  30-57  30

Dynamo Dresden (4 top level seasons)
1991/92 14.Dynamo Dresden          38 12 10 16  34-50  34
1992/93 15.Dynamo Dresden          34  7 13 14  32-49  27
1993/94 12.Dynamo Dresden          34 10 14 10  33-44  34
1994/95 18.Dynamo Dresden          34  4  8 22  33-68  16

VfB Leipzig (1 top level season)
1993/94 18.VfB Leipzig             34  3 11 20  32-69  17

Cup (von-Tschammer-Pokal)

1936: winners:   VfB Leipzig             (2-1 vs Schalke 04)
1937: semifinal: Dresdner SC             (2-5 vs Fortuna Düsseldorf)
1940: winners:   Dresdner SC             (2-1 aet vs 1.FC Nürnberg)
1941: winners:   Dresdner SC             (2-1 vs Schalke 04)
1943: semifinal: Dresdner SC             (1-2 vs LSV Groß Hamburg)

Cup (DFB-Pokal)

1993: semifinal: Chemnitzer FC           (1-2 vs Hertha BSC Amateure)
1994: semifinal: Dynamo Dresden          (0-2 vs Werder Bremen)
1997: finalists: Energie Cottbus         (0-2 vs VfB Stuttgart)
2000: semifinal: Hansa Rostock           (2-3 vs Bayern München)
2001: finalists: Union Berlin            (0-2 vs Schalke 04)
2008: semifinal: Carl Zeiss Jena         (0-3 vs Borussia Dortmund)
2011: semifinal: Energie Cottbus         (1-2 vs MSV Duisburg)
Some remarks on the clubs involved: the VfB Leipzig winning two German championships and losing two more finals before the second World War was dissolved in 1945; a new club called SG Probstheida was founded in their place, but there is no continuity between the 'old' VfB Leipzig and the team of the same name who played one season in the German Bundesliga; that 'new' version originated from East German powerhouse Lokomotive Leipzig, who never won the league championship but claimed 5 East German cups and were losing finalists (to Ajax) in the 1986/87 Cup Winners' Cup.
The Dresdner SC was also dissolved in 1945 and 'replaced' by SG Friedrichstadt. This club lost the last match of the 1949/50 league season, decisive for the championship, 1-5 at home to ZSG Horch Zwickau, the declared favourites of the political rulers (both clubs had been equal on points ahead of the match). In the following summer, SG Friedrichstadt were dissolved, and most of its players left for West Germany (first Berlin, where many played at Hertha BSC 1950/51, then Heidelberg; their attempt to enter the West German league structure 1951/52 as DSC Heidelberg was rejected by the DFB). The vacant place in the East German league structure was eventually taken by SG Volkspolizei Dresden, who later became Dynamo Dresden and as such won 8 East German league championships and 7 East German cups before playing in the (unified) German Bundesliga for 4 seasons. Therefore, this club (Dynamo Dresden) cannot be seen as successors of the pre-war Dresdner SC; the current club called Dresdner SC 1898, founded in March 1990, which absorbed Lok Dresden (formerly called Mickten, Sachsenverlag Dresden, Rotation Dresden and Einheit Dresden), also cannot make any such claim.
Union Oberschöneweide were also dissolved 1945, and a new club called SG Oberschöneweide was founded (and renamed Union Oberschöneweide in 1947, playing in the Oberliga Berlin, see above); from this club the current Union Berlin eventually evolved in 1966. Under that name, the club reached two East German cup finals, winning in 1968 (2-1 vs Carl Zeiss Jena) and losing in 1986 (1-5 vs Lokomotive Leipzig). When they made the 2000/01 German cup final, they were a third division side (winning promotion in the same season).
Chemnitzer FC originated from the East German club FC Karl-Marx-Stadt (the name of its home town was restored to the original version after the country was dissolved), which won one East German championship (1966/67) and reached and lost 3 East German cup finals (0-4 vs 1.FC Magdeburg in both 1969 and 1983 and 0-1 vs Dynamo Berlin in 1989).
Energie Cottbus were founded in 1963 and mostly played at the East German second level before unification; their best top level finish in the East German league structure was 7th in 1989/90; they never reached the East German cup final, twice being ousted at the semifinal stage (1974 by Carl Zeiss Jena, 1982 by Dynamo Dresden). When they made the 1996/97 German cup final, they were a third division side (winning promotion in the same season).
Carl Zeiss Jena won 3 East German championships (one as Motor Jena in 1962/63, the other two in 1967/68 and 1969/70) and 4 East German Cups (as Motor Jena in 1960, under their current name in 1971/72, 1973/74 and 1979/80). After their last cup win, they managed an impressive run in the Cup Winners Cup, reaching the 1981 final against Dynamo Tbilisi (lost 1-2 after having taken the lead shortly after the hour mark), played in front of a fairly empty stadium in Düsseldorf; they had earlier eliminated an entire Latin armada in Roma, Valencia and Benfica as well as Welsh part-timers Newport County. In addition, they were losing finalists in 3 other editions of the East German cup. They reached the German cup semifinals of 2007/08 as a relegation threatened second division club, having eliminated both finalists of the previous season (VfB Stuttgart and 1.FC Nürnberg).
Finally, the most successful East German club since unification, Hansa Rostock, was 'founded' 1954 by the transfer of Empor Lauter (in the southern mining area of the country) to the Mecklenburg coast (the name change from Empor to Hansa occurred in 1965); they were the 'nearly men' of East Germany, finishing runners-up in the league 4 times in the sixties (1961/62, 1962/63, 1963/64 and 1967/68) and losing 5 cup finals (1954/55, 1957, 1960, 1966/67 and 1986/87), never winning any honour during the existence of the country. Only after unification, when the East German league continued for one season (1990/91) as the Oberliga Nordost, they tasted success, winning the league-and-cup double.

Saar clubs in the (West) German football structure
Championship (Deutsche Meisterschaft/Bundesliga)

1943: finalists: FV Saarbrücken         (0-3 vs Dresdner SC)
1952: finalists: 1.FC Saarbrücken       (2-3 vs VfB Stuttgart)

Three Saar clubs played in the Bundesliga since 1963:

1.FC Saarbrücken (5 top level seasons)

1963/64 16.1.FC Saarbrücken        30  6  5 19  44-72  17
1976/77 14.1.FC Saarbrücken        34  9 11 14  43-55  29
1977/78 17.1.FC Saarbrücken        34  6 10 18  39-70  22
1985/86 17.1.FC Saarbrücken        34  6  9 19  39-68  21
1992/93 18.1.FC Saarbrücken        34  5 13 16  37-71  23

Borussia Neunkirchen (3 top level seasons)

1964/65 10.Borussia Neunkirchen    30  9  9 12  44-48  27
1965/66 17.Borussia Neunkirchen    34  9  4 21  32-82  22
1967/68 17.Borussia Neunkirchen    34  7  5 22  33-93  19

FC Homburg/Saar (3 top level seasons)

1986/87 16.FC Homburg              34  6  9 19  33-79  21
1987/88 17.FC Homburg              34  7 10 17  37-70  24
1989/90 18.FC Homburg              34  8  8 18  33-51  24

Cup (DFB-Pokal)

1957: semifinal: 1.FC Saarbrücken        (1-3 aet vs Bayern München)
1958: semifinal: 1.FC Saarbrücken        (1-4 vs VfB Stuttgart)
1959: finalists: Borussia Neunkirchen    (2-5 vs Schwarz-Weiß Essen)
1985: semifinal: 1.FC Saarbrücken        (0-1 vs Bayer Uerdingen)
Some remarks on the clubs involved: Borussia Neunkirchen played in the Ehrenliga, the independent Saar championship held for three seasons from 1948/49 to 1950/51, and won it in the first of those seasons (then still as VfB Neunkirchen). FC Homburg also played there all three seasons, but never finished higher than third (in 1948/49). 1.FC Saarbrücken only entered their reserve side (who won it 1950/51), preferring to play in the French second division as guest team (1948/49), albeit hors concours (they would have won the division had their matches counted); when their request to enter that league on a regular basis in 1949/50 was eventually rejected, they organised the Saarland-Pokal, an international club tournament, for two seasons before the Saar clubs were allowed to re-enter the Oberliga Südwest, where they had already played from 1945/46 to 1947/48, in 1951/52. In that season, 1.FC Saarbrücken reached the final of the West German championship (though Saarbrücken did not belong to West Germany at the time).

Soviet Union

Armenia | Azerbaijan | Belarus | Estonia | Georgia | Kazakhstan | Kyrgyzstan | Latvia | Lithuania | Moldova | Russia | Tajikistan | Turkmenistan | Ukraine | Uzbekistan

FIFA and UEFA may see Russia as the natural successors of the former Soviet Union, but we consider it as just one of the 15 countries to have been (re-)established after the breakdown in the early nineties. Certainly, Russia contributed most of the population and geographical area, and also most of the strongest football clubs, and until 1960 all league titles went to Moscow, but by the time the union broke down, the record champions were Dynamo Kiev from Ukraine and 20 of 54 championships as well as 20 of 51 cups had gone outside of the current Russian borders (16 of each to the Ukraine). Moreover, all 4 European trophies (3 Cup Winners Cups and 1 Super Cup) won by Soviet teams were contributed by non-Russian clubs. Should the city of Moscow ever decide to go its own way in football, there would be far more justification in considering it the natural successor of Russia (in football terms) than to do so now for Russia w.r.t. the Soviet Union. Over the last three decades (1961-1990) of the country's existence, Ukrainian clubs were far more successful, winning more than half of the league titles and half of the Soviet cups on offer.

Until 1956, there was a sixteenth Soviet Socialist Republic, the Karelo-Finnish SSR, which comprised some areas annexed from Finland during the second World War (the Karelian Isthmus and Ladoga Karelia). It was relegated to an ASSR (autonomous SSR) within Russia (as Karelian ASSR) in 1956 (and thereby lost its constitutional secession right). See the section on moving countries for information on clubs from Vyborg/Viipuri (on the Karelian Isthmus) and Sortavala (on Lake Ladoga) playing in the Finnish league structure.

Another former ASSR is that of Abkhazia, which lies within the internationally recognised borders of Georgia (but also borders the Black Sea and Russia). This region has claimed independence and organises its own championship since 1994; see the separate section on the (de facto) split of Georgia.

Due to the dominance of Russia and the Ukraine, we do not treat those two republics 'equally' with the 13 others; while for the smaller ones we indicate all clubs to ever reach the Soviet top flight or cup semifinals, for Russia and Ukraine we only summarise the winners of Soviet honours (as well as their palmares after disintegration).

The states resulting from the breakdown are listed in (English) alphabetical order (like in all comparable situations in this document). For additional data, see also Former Soviet Union - Regional Analysis.

Note that the former Russian Empire, whose territory the Soviet Union roughly inherited after the 1917-1922 Civil War, organised two championships for city selections in 1912 and 1913, which involved cities from Poland and the Ukraine.

Armenian clubs in the USSR football structure

Only one Armenian club, Ararat Yerevan, reached the top flight of Soviet football (albeit under different names: they were known as Dynamo and as Spartak for part of their history). Their best period was the first half of the seventies, with as highlight winning the league-and-cup double in 1973. They also were runners-up twice and won a second cup in 1975. Since the split, Ararat won one Armenian championship (1993) and five cups (1993, 1994, 1995, 1997 and 2008; they also lost the 2001 and 2007 finals), having ceded their status as the country's first club to Pyunik around the turn of the millennium.

Note that Nagorno-Karabakh, an independent region within the Azerbaijani SSR during Soviet times, is de facto independent, and clubs originating from its main city Stepanakert currently play in the Armenian league (hosting their matches outside of Nagorno-Karabakh though); nevertheless, the region is within the internationally recognised borders of Azerbaijan, though controlled by Armenia.

Championship

Ararat Yerevan
Top-5 finishes (in 33 top level seasons)
1971     2.Ararat Yerevan          30 13 11  6  37-28  37
1972     4.Ararat Yerevan          30 12 10  8  38-29  34
1973     1.Ararat Yerevan          30 18  7  5  79-55  39  [-4]
         NB: drawn matches were decided by penalties, with only 
             the shootout winners obtaining a point.
1974     5.Ararat Yerevan          30 11 10  9  37-28  32
1975     5.Ararat Yerevan          30 15  4 11  40-38  34
1976 spr 2.Ararat Yerevan          15  8  3  4  22-13  19
1982     5.Ararat Yerevan          34 14 10 10  50-47  38

Cup

1954: finalists: Spartak Yerevan         (1-2 vs Dynamo Kiev)
1962: semifinal: Spartak Yerevan         (0-1 vs Znamya Truda Orekhovo-Zuyevo)
1973: winners:   Ararat Yerevan          (2-1 vs Dynamo Kiev)
1975: winners:   Ararat Yerevan          (2-1 vs Zarya Voroshilovgrad)
1976: finalists: Ararat Yerevan          (0-3 vs Dynamo Tbilisi)
1991: semifinal: Ararat Yerevan          (0-0, 6-7 pen vs Torpedo Moscow)
Azerbaijani clubs in the USSR football structure

Three clubs from Azerbaijan reached the Soviet top flight. Two only lasted one season (Dynamo Kirovabad, from the town called GƏncƏ since 1991, and Temp Baku) while Neftchi Baku (earlier known as Neftianik) played there 27 seasons, their best ever league finish being 3rd in 1966; they also were eliminated at the semifinal stage of the Soviet Cup on 4 occasions within 5 seasons. No Azerbaijani club ever reached the Soviet cup final. Since the split, Neftchi (nowadays Neftçi Bakı) won 8 championships in Azerbaijan and 7 cups (both are records). Dinamo Kirovabad were renamed Kyepez (Kapaz) in 1973 and won 3 league championships and 4 cups in Azerbaijan since independence. They were renamed FK GƏncƏ during the 2004/05 season and withdrew from the 2006/07 league. Temp Baku were a temporary phenomenon - they were dissolved in 1940.

Note that Nagorno-Karabakh, an independent region within the Azerbaijani SSR during Soviet times, is de facto independent, and clubs originating from its main city Stepanakert currently play in the Armenian league (hosting their matches outside of Nagorno-Karabakh though); nevertheless, the region is within the internationally recognised borders of Azerbaijan, though controlled by Armenia.

City name correspondences: 
Russian          Azerbaijani
Baku             Bakı
Kirovabad        GƏncƏ

Championship

Neftianik/Neftchi Baku
Top-5 finishes (in 27 top level seasons)
1966     3.Neftianik Baku          36 18  9  9  56-28  45
1967     5.Neftchi Baku            36 16 10 10  51-33  42

Dynamo Kirovabad (1 top level season))
1968    20.Dynamo Kirovabad        38  5  9 24  25-59  19

Temp Baku (1 top level season)
1938    19.Temp Baku               25  6  8 11  33-40  20

Cup

1967: semifinal: Neftchi Baku            (0-3 vs CSKA Moscow)
1968: semifinal: Neftchi Baku            (0-2 vs Torpedo Moscow)
1970: semifinal: Neftchi Baku            (0-1 vs Dynamo Tbilisi)
1971: semifinal: Neftchi Baku            (0-5 vs Spartak Moscow)
Belarussian clubs in the USSR football structure

Only one Belarussian club played in the Soviet top division, under 3 different names (Dynamo Minsk, Spartak Minsk and Belarus Minsk). They won one championship, in 1982, and reached and lost two Soviet Cup finals. Since the independence of Belarus, Dynamo won 7 league championships (including the first five editions) and 3 cup tournaments.

Note that prior to World War II, parts of Belarus (including cities such as Brest/Brześć, Hrodna/Grodno and Pinsk/Pińsk) belonged to Poland.

As an aside, note that the Polish region around Białystok (Belastok in Belarussian, Belostok in Russian) was occupied by the Soviet Union from 1939 to 1944 and as such part of the Belarussian Soviet Socialist Republic. No information on football activities during this period is available.

Championship

Dynamo Minsk
Top-5 finishes (in 39 top level seasons)
1954     3.Spartak Minsk           24 12  6  6  29-23  30
1963     3.Dynamo Minsk            38 18 12  8  47-27  48
1965     4.Dynamo Minsk            32 14  9  9  37-27  37
1967     4.Dynamo Minsk            38 13 17  6  47-31  43
1982     1.Dynamo Minsk            34 19  9  6  63-35  47
1983     3.Dynamo Minsk            34 17  9  8  51-34  43
1984     5.Dynamo Minsk            34 15 13  6  43-28  40  [-3]
         NB: points were only awarded for the first 10 draws
1985     4.Dynamo Minsk            34 16  9  9  40-31  41
1987     5.Dynamo Minsk            30 12  9  9  33-25  33

Cup

1965: finalists: Dynamo Minsk            (0-0, 1-2 vs Spartak Moscow)
1966: semifinal: Dynamo Minsk            (0-1 vs Dynamo Kiev)
1987: finalists: Dynamo Minsk            (3-3 aet, 2-4 pen vs Dynamo Kiev)
Estonian clubs in the USSR football structure

Only one Estonian club, Kalev Tallinn, played in the top Soviet division, and that for only 2 seasons. In 58 matches they managed only 3 wins, 2 of them in the relegation playoff in their first season. No Estonian club ever reached the Soviet cup semifinals. Prior to Estonia's annexation by the Soviet Union at the start of World War II, Kalev had won two Estonian championships (1923 and 1930) and reached one cup final (1939, lost 1-4 vs Tallinna JK). The football section of this omnisports club was dissolved at some stage afterwards but refounded in 2002, and returned to the Estonian top level in 2007, finishing sixth.

Championship

Kalev Tallinn (2 top level seasons) 
1960    19.Kalev Tallinn           26  2  6 18  21-72  10  [group and playoff]
1961    22.Kalev Tallinn           32  1  8 23  25-74  10
Georgian clubs in the USSR football structure

Five Georgian clubs played in the Soviet top flight: two lasted only one season, and one just two, but Torpedo Kutaisi held their own for 13 seasons and Dynamo Tbilisi was one of the powerhouses of the Soviet Union, ever present from the second edition of the Soviet league in the fall of 1936 until departing for an independent Georgian championship in 1990, winning 2 league championships, 2 Soviet Cups (and losing 6 finals), and bringing home a European trophy (the 1980/81 Cup Winners Cup, won 2-1 against Carl Zeiss Jena in a fairly deserted stadium in Düsseldorf).

Since Georgia organises its own independent championship, Dinamo Tbilisi have won it 15 times, including each of the first ten editions, and won 11 cups, including each of the first six. Their six consecutive league-and-cup doubles from 1991/92 to 1996/97 are a world record they share with Pakhtakor Toshkent (2002 to 2007) in Uzbekistan. Torpedo Kutaisi won 3 championships and 2 cups, Lokomotivi Tbilisi have won 3 cups and Guria Lanchkhuti 1. Spartaki Tbilisi played two seasons in the top Georgian league division (2003/04 and 2005/06) but its relationship with the 1950s club is doubtful.

Note that the former Autonomous Socialist Soviet Republic of Abkhazia, which lies within the internationally recognised borders of Georgia, claimed independence and organises its own championship since 1994; clubs from the region (whose main cities include Sukhumi, Gali, Ochamchira and Gagra) played in the Georgian league structure until 1993 and a team called Dinamo Sukhumi also entered in 2005/06 (but played in Tbilisi), while FC Gagra played at the second Georgian level since 2005, obtaining entry to the 2008/09 first level, they were relegated in 2009/10 but won promotion again in the following season, winning the 2010/11 cup as a bonus; like Dinamo Sukhumi they play home matches in Tbilisi.

Championship

Dynamo Tbilisi
Top-3 finishes (in 51 top level seasons)
1936 aut 3.Dynamo Tbilisi           7  3  3  1  14- 9  16
1939     2.Dynamo Tbilisi          26 14  5  7  60-41  33
1940     2.Dynamo Tbilisi          24 15  4  5  56-30  34
1946     3.Dynamo Tbilisi          22 15  3  4  47 26  33
1947     3.Dynamo Tbilisi          24 14  5  5  57-30  33
1950     3.Dynamo Tbilisi          36 20  7  9  78-50  47
1951     2.Dynamo Tbilisi          28 15  6  7  59-36  36
1953     2.Dynamo Tbilisi          20 11  5  4  39-24  27
1959     3.Dynamo Tbilisi          22 12  3  7  48-33  27
1962     3.Dynamo Tbilisi          22 10  8  4  29-20  28
1964     1.Dynamo Tbilisi          32 18 10  4  48-30  46
         NB: Dynamo won championship playoff (4-1 aet vs Torpedo Moscow)
1967     3.Dynamo Tbilisi          36 16 13  7  53-33  45
1969     3.Dynamo Tbilisi          26 12 11  3  34-17  35
1971     3.Dynamo Tbilisi          30 14  8  8  33-33  36
1972     3.Dynamo Tbilisi          30 12 11  7  41-34  35
1976 spr 3.Dynamo Tbilisi          15  7  4  4  18-10  18
1976 aut 3.Dynamo Tbilisi          15  6  5  4  16-12  17
1977     2.Dynamo Tbilisi          30 13 13  4  43-26  39
1978     1.Dynamo Tbilisi          30 17  8  5  45-24  42
1981     3.Dynamo Tbilisi          34 16 10  8  62-35  42

Torpedo Kutaisi
Best 5 league finishes (in 13 top level seasons)
1963    12.Torpedo Kutaisi         38  6 21 11  22-37  33
1964    13.Torpedo Kutaisi         32 10  7 15  20-37  27
1967    13.Torpedo Kutaisi         36  8 15 13  37-50  31
1982    13.Torpedo Kutaisi         34 10 10 14  39-45  30
1985    11.Torpedo Kutaisi         34 11  9 14  40-51  31

Spartak Tbilisi (2 top level seasons) 
1950     9.Spartak Tbilisi         36 14  9 13  50-53  37
1951    14.Spartak Tbilisi         28  7  2 19  32-56  16

Guria Lanchkhuti (1 top level season)
1987    16.Guria Lanchkhuti        30  5  8 17  18-38  18

Lokomotiv Tbilisi (1 top level season)
1938    24.Lokomotiv Tbilisi       25  5  5 15  44-62  15
NB: Lokomotiv were to play in the 1940 league but withdrew

Cup

1936: finalists: Dynamo Tbilisi          (0-2 vs Lokomotiv Moscow)
1937: finalists: Dynamo Tbilisi          (2-5 vs Dynamo Moscow)
1946: finalists: Dynamo Tbilisi          (2-3 vs Spartak Moscow)
1960: finalists: Dynamo Tbilisi          (3-4 vs Torpedo Moscow)
1970: finalists: Dynamo Tbilisi          (1-2 vs Dynamo Moscow)
1974: semifinal: Dynamo Tbilisi          (0-1, 0-0 vs Dynamo Kiev)
1975: semifinal: Dynamo Tbilisi          (1-3 vs Ararat Yerevan)
1976: winners:   Dynamo Tbilisi          (3-0 vs Ararat Yerevan)
1979: winners:   Dynamo Tbilisi          (0-0 aet, 5-4 pen vs Dynamo Moscow)
1980: finalists: Dynamo Tbilisi          (1-2 vs Shakhter Donetsk)
1982: semifinal: Dynamo Tbilisi          (0-2 vs Dynamo Kiev)
1989: semifinal: Dynamo Tbilisi          (1-2 vs Dnepr Dnepropetrovsk)
Kazakh clubs in the USSR football structure

Only one Kazakh club played in the Soviet top division, Kairat Alma-Ata, who managed to play 24 seasons at that level. They reached the semifinals of the Soviet Cup in 1963. After independence, they play (as Qayrat Almaty) in the Kazakh league, in which they claimed two championships; they also won a record 5 Kazakh cups.

Note that the Kazakh Socialist Soviet Republic was only established in December 1936; before, the Kazakh Autonomous Republic had been part of the Russian Federation, and so Dinamo Aktyubinsk entered the first ever Soviet Cup in 1936 (in which they lost 0-4 to CDKA (now CSKA) Moscow in the 1/32 finals) as a Russian team although the town of Aktyubinsk (now called Aqtöbe, and as such home of the 2007 and 2008 Kazakh champions FK Aqtöbe) is in Kazakhstan.

Championship

Kairat Alma-Ata
Top-10 finishes (in 24 top level seasons)
1971     8.Kairat Alma-Ata         30  9 10 11  36-40  28
1973     9.Kairat Alma-Ata         30  8 11 11  25-37  26  [-1] 
         NB: drawn matches were decided by penalties, with only 
             the shootout winners obtaining a point; Kairat won
             10 of their 11 shoot-outs!
1977     8.Kairat Alma-Ata         30  6 17  7  26-31  29
1984     8.Kairat Alma-Ata         34 13  8 13  44-42  34
1985     9.Kairat Alma-Ata         34 11 13 10  43-46  32  [-3]
         NB: points were only awarded for the first 10 draws
1986     7.Kairat Alma-Ata         30 11  8 11  33-39  30

Cup

1963: semifinal: Kairat Alma-Ata         (1-2 vs Shakhter Donetsk)
Kyrgyz clubs in the USSR football structure

No Kyrgyz club ever played in the Soviet top level or reached a Soviet cup semifinal. (In 1948, a top flight with about 30 clubs, including at least one from each Soviet Republic, was planned but eventually cancelled; the prospective Kyrgyz participants were Zenit Frunze.)
Alga Frunze (their home town is now called Bishkek) played several seasons at the second level, their best performance being an 11th place finish in 1972. Since independence, this club won the league-and-cup double in 1992 before converting to Alga-PVO and then SKA-PVO Bishkek, as which they won 7 consecutive cup finals and 3 championships.

Soviet First League (2nd level)
Alga Frunze (best performance)
1972    11.Alga Frunze             38 10 14 14  42-44  34
Latvian clubs in the USSR football structure

Only one Latvian club played in the Soviet top division, Daugava Riga, who completed 7 seasons there. Their best ever league placing was 11th, in 1951. The club was founded in 1948 and so did not participate in Latvian football prior to the annexation by the Soviet Union. After independence, they reached the 1992 cup final (as Daugava/Kompar), losing 0-1 after extra time to Skonto Rīga, but the club went bankrupt in 1995. A club called Amstrig then was renamed to Daugava Rīga and finished runners-up in the Virslīga behind Skonto in 1996 and 1997, but it was not related to the old Daugava and eventually disappeared from the top level as well.

Note that although all other Baltic clubs withdrew from the Soviet league structure before the start of the 1991 season at the latest, one Latvian club, Pardaugava Riga, played at the second level (Pervaja Liga) of the Soviet league structure in 1991, finishing 22nd and last. As Latvia became formally independent in August 1991, they played the last few months of the season as a roving club.

Championship

Daugava Riga (7 top level seasons) 
1949    17.Daugava Riga            34  7  5 22  21-64  19
1950    12.Daugava Riga            36 12  8 16  37-45  32
1951    11.Daugava Riga            28  9  7 12  44-44  25
1952    12.Daugava Riga            13  2  5  6  10-14   9
1960    12.Daugava Riga            30  9 11 10  35-36  29  [group and playoff]
1961    21.Daugava Riga            32  5  7 20  30-63  17
1962    21.Daugava Riga            18  6  4  8  14-20  16
Lithuanian clubs in the USSR football structure

Only one Lithuanian club played in the Soviet top division, Zalgiris Vilnius (called Spartak for part of their history), who completed 11 seasons. In the eighties they consistently managed top-10 finishes after earning promotion in 1982, with their best ever final placing 3rd in 1987. The club was founded in 1947 and so did not play any role in Lithuanian football prior to the annexation of the Baltic states by the Soviet Union; for that matter, no club from the current capital of Lithuania did, as Vilnius/Wilno was part of Poland at the time.
The area around Klaipėda/Memel was part of Germany until 1923; clubs from Klaipėda played in the Lithuanian league between 1924 and 1939 (when Germany invaded the area) but also played several seasons during this period in the German league structure.

Championship

Zalgiris Vilnius
Top-10 finishes (in 11 top level seasons)
1983     5.Zalgiris Vilnius        34 15  9 10  38-36  39
1984     9.Zalgiris Vilnius        34 12 11 11  30-38  34  [-1]
         NB: points were only awarded for the first 10 draws
1985     7.Zalgiris Vilnius        34 12 11 11  43-49  34  [-1]
         NB: points were only awarded for the first 10 draws
1986     8.Zalgiris Vilnius        30 11  8 11  32-37  30
1987     3.Zalgiris Vilnius        30 14  8  8  43-29  36
1988     5.Zalgiris Vilnius        30 14  7  9  39-35  35
1989     4.Zalgiris Vilnius        30 14  8  8  39-29  36

Cup

1988: semifinal: Zalgiris Vilnius        (1-2 vs Metallist Kharkov)
Moldovan clubs in the USSR football structure

Only one Moldovan club played in the Soviet top division, Nistru Kishinev, also known as Dynamo, Burevestnik, Moldava, Avintul and Moldova during their history. In the 1991 season, Tiligul Tiraspol were second level runners-up and earned promotion to the Soviet top flight, but they joined the newly formed independent Moldovan league in 1992. No Moldovan club ever reached the semifinals of the Soviet Cup. Nistru were renamed Zimbru Chişinău after independence and as such won 8 league championships (a record until the rise of Sheriff Tiraspol) and 5 Moldovan cups (also that formerly a record now surpassed by Sheriff). Tiligul finished runners-up behind Zimbru on 6 occasions and won 3 cups but later lost top status in their home town, which lies in Transdnistria, to Sheriff, winners of ten consecutive championships from 2000/01 to 2009/10. After having been renamed Tiligul-Tiras in 2004, the club were dissolved due to financial problems in 2009.

See also the section on Romania, as prior to the second World War, most of the current Republic of Moldova belonged (as Bessarabia) to that country. In fact, the Moldovian Socialist Soviet Republic was formed by merging Bessarabia with the Moldovian Autonomous Republic (part of Ukraine and corresponding to current Transdnistria) in August 1940; Spartak Tiraspol entered the 1938 Soviet Cup (in which they lost 0-4 to Dzerzhinets Kremenchug in the 1/256 finals) as Ukrainian representatives.

As an aside, note that SKA Odessa (who twice played in the top Soviet league in 1965 and 1966 (finishing last both seasons, 17th and 19th respectively) and also entered the Ukrainian top league in 1992 (finishing 10th and last in their group)) temporarily (between 1972 and 1976) moved to Tiraspol (then part of the Moldovian Socialist Soviet Republic) and as such represented Moldova in the second level of the Soviet league structure (known as Zvezda Tiraspol 1972-73 and Komanda goroda Tiraspol 1974-75).

Championship

Nistru Kishinev
Best 5 league finishes (in 11 top level seasons)
1956     6.Burevestnik Kishinev    22  9  5  8  38-49  23
1957     9.Burevestnik Kishinev    22  4 10  8  24-36  18
1958    11.Moldova Kishinev        22  3  9 10  25-47  15
1959    10.Moldova Kishinev        22  6  5 11  22-45  17
1962    12.Moldova Kishinev        22  3  5 14  20-35  11
Russian clubs in the USSR football structure

Five different Russian clubs accounted for 34 league championships, including all 22 played between 1936 and 1960 (and so only 12 in the last 3 decades of the existence of the Soviet Union) while 31 Soviet cups, including 18 of the 19 played between 1936 and 1960, were won by seven different Russian clubs. Twenty-six other Russian clubs reached the Soviet top flight, and five lost Soviet cup finals.
Four of the clubs involved won league championships in Russia after the disintegration of the Soviet Union, and one other won a cup: Spartak Moskva (a record 9 championships, 3 cups), Lokomotiv Moskva (2 championships, 5 cups; Lokomotiv never won a Soviet championship), CSKA Moskva (5 championships and a record 7 cups), Zenit Sankt Peterburg (2 championships and 2 cups; Leningrad having reverted to its old name) and Dinamo Moskva (1 cup). Torpedo have been less successful, not only failing to win silverware but suffering relegation in 2006 for the first time since entering the Soviet top level in 1937.

Note that some regions now in Russia belonged to Finland (Karelian Isthmus with Viipuri/Vyborg and Ladoga Karelia with Sortavala) and Germany (East Prussia (Ostpreußen) with Köningsberg/Kaliningrad and Insterburg/Černjahovsk) before the second World War.

Championship

Spartak Moscow (12 championships)
1936, 1938, 1939, 1952, 1953, 1956, 1958, 1962, 1969, 1979,
1987, 1989
NB: the 1936 title was the autumn one.

Dynamo Moscow (11 championships)
1936, 1937, 1940, 1945, 1949, 1954, 1955, 1957, 1959, 1963,
1976 
NB: the 1936 and 1976 titles were the spring ones.

CSKA Moscow (7 championships; includes CDKA and CDSA) 
1946, 1947, 1948, 1950, 1951, 1970, 1991
NB: the 4 titles 1946-50 were won as CDKA, the 1951 one as CDSA

Torpedo Moscow (3 championships)
1960, 1965, 1976 (autumn)

Zenit Leningrad (1 championship)
1984

Cup

Spartak Moscow (10 cups)
1938, 1939, 1946, 1947, 1950, 1958, 1963, 1965, 1971, 1992

Dynamo Moscow (6 cups)
1937, 1953, 1967, 1970, 1977, 1985

Torpedo Moscow (6 cups)
1949, 1952, 1960, 1968, 1972, 1986

CSKA Moscow (5 cups; includes CDKA and CDSA) 
1945, 1948, 1951, 1955, 1991
NB: the 2 cups 1945-48 were won as CDKA, the 2 1951-55 as CDSA

Lokomotiv Moscow (2 cups)
1936, 1957

SKA Rostov-na-Donu (1 cup)
1981

Zenit Leningrad (1 cup)
1944
Tajik clubs in the USSR football structure

Only one Tajik club played in the Soviet top division, Pamir Dushanbe. They first gained promotion in 1988 and preserved their status for three seasons before joining the new Tajik league. In the last Soviet Cup, played 1991/92 and characterised by the withdrawal of many teams from break-away republics, Pamir reached the semifinals. After independence, Pamir won 2 league championships and one Tajik cup, including the 1992 league-and-cup double. After their 1995 title, the players all left the club and the country, moving to Uzbekistan, where there was no civil war and they could earn more money, and the club was dissolved.

Championship

Pamir Dushanbe (3 top level seasons)
1989    13.Pamir Dushanbe          30  7 10 13  20-38  24
1990    10.Pamir Dushanbe          24  7  4 13  26-34  18
1991    10.Pamir Dushanbe          30  7 13 10  28-32  27

Cup

1992: semifinal: Pamir Dushanbe          (0-2 vs CSKA Moscow)
Turkmen clubs in the USSR football structure

No Turkmen club ever played in the Soviet top level or reached a Soviet cup semifinal. (In 1948, a top flight with about 30 clubs, including at least one from each Soviet Republic, was planned but eventually cancelled; the prospective Turkmen participants were Lokomotiv Ashgabat.)
Kolhozchi Ashgabat played several seasons at the second level (also as Stroitel), their best performance being a 9th place finish in 1976.

Soviet First League (2nd level)
Kolhozchi Ashgabat (best performance)
1976     9.Kolhozchi Ashgabat      38 16  7 15  61-62  39
Ukrainian clubs in the USSR football structure

Three different Ukrainian clubs accounted for 16 league championships, all in the three decades from 1961 to 1990, and as many Soviet cups were brought to the Ukraine by 5 different clubs, all but one in the same three decades from 1961 to 1990. Apart from the six clubs involved, also precisely all Ukrainian clubs to reach the Soviet cup final (1972 champions Zarya Voroshilovgrad lost both their cup finals in 1974 and 1975), eight others reached the Soviet top flight.
Among the six clubs to win honours in the Soviet Union, only 2 managed to do so since independence: Dynamo Kyiv won 13 league titles and 10 Ukrainian cups (both records) while Shakhtar Donetsk (who never won the Soviet league) claimed 9 championships and 9 cups. These two clubs have won all Ukrainian honours between 1994 (when Chornomorets Odesa won the 1993/94 cup) and 2009 (when Vorskla Poltava won the 2008/09 cup). Dnipro Dnipropetrovsk reached 3 cup finals but lost them all to Shakhtar, while Karpaty Lviv faced Dynamo Kyiv in both of their cup final appearances and were defeated both times. Metalist Kharkiv reached the first cup final since independence in 1992 but lost it to Chornomorets. Zarya Voroshilovgrad, probably the most surprising club to have ever won a Soviet championship, are currently called Zorja Luhansk, after their home town returned to its original name, and spent most time since independence moving between the divisions, dropping as deep as the third division for five seasons (1998-2003) before returning to the top flight for the 2006/07 season.

As an aside, note that SKA Odessa (who twice played in the top Soviet league in 1965 and 1966 (finishing last both seasons, 17th and 19th respectively) and also entered the Ukrainian top league in 1992 (finishing 10th and last in their group)) temporarily (between 1972 and 1976) moved to Tiraspol (then part of the Moldovian Socialist Soviet Republic) and as such represented Moldova in the second level of the Soviet league structure (known as Zvezda Tiraspol 1972-73 and Komanda goroda Tiraspol 1974-75).

Another 'internal' border change during the Soviet era involves the Crimea peninsula. This was part of the Russian Federation until February 1954, when it was transferred to the Ukrainian Socialist Soviet Republic. Five clubs from the area played in the Soviet Cup as Russian clubs: Pischevik Simferopol' (in 1938 only, losing 0-1 to Spartak Simferopol' in the 1/256 finals), Spartak Simferopol' (in 1938 only, losing 1-2 to Lokomotiv Kiev in the 1/32 finals), Pischevik Kerch' (in 1938 only, losing 1-3 to Spartak Simferopol' in the 1/128 finals), Stal Kerch' (in 1938 only, losing 2-3 to Sudostroitel Sevastopol' in the 1/128 finals), and Sudostroitel Sevastopol' (on four occasions, 1936-38 and 1949, with their best performance reaching the 1/32 finals in 1936, losing 2-3 to KhTZ Kharkov). Sudostroitel Sevastopol' also played one season at the second level of the Soviet league structure (finishing 10th out of 11 in the Russian Zone of Class B in 1949).

Note that some comparatively small parts of the Ukraine belonged to Romania (northern Bukovina and the area south of current Moldova bordering the Black Sea) and (Czecho-)Slovakia (Transcarpathia or Carpathian Ruthenia) prior to the second World War. A much larger part (comprising (parts of) Galicia, Podolia and Volhynia, and including cities such as Lviv/Lemberg/Lwów/Lvov, Łuck/Lutsk, Rivne/Równe, and Stanisławów/Ivano-Frankivsk) belonged to Poland. During the war, Hungary occupied Transcarpathia (Kárpátalja, a region which had belonged to Hungary for centuries).
Moreover, Ukrainian city selections entered the Russian championships of 1912 and 1913.

Championship

Dynamo Kiev (13 championships)
1961, 1966, 1967, 1968, 1971, 1974, 1975, 1977, 1980, 1981,
1985, 1986, 1990

Dnepr Dnepropetrovsk (2 championships)
1983, 1988

Zarya Voroshilovgrad (1 championship)
1972

Cup

Dynamo Kiev (9 cups)
1954, 1964, 1966, 1974, 1978, 1982, 1985, 1987, 1990

Shakhter Donetsk (4 cups, includes Shakhter Stalino)
1961, 1962, 1980, 1983
NB: the 1961 cup was won as Shakhter Stalino, after the
    temporary name of the club's hometown

Metalist Kharkov (1 cup)
1988

Dnepr Dnepropetrovsk (1 cup)
1989

Karpaty Lvov (1 cup)
1969
Uzbek clubs in the USSR football structure

Only one Uzbek club played in the Soviet top division, Pakhtakor Tashkent, who were active at the level for 22 seasons, finishing 6th on 2 occasions and in the top-10 on 8. They once reached the Soviet Cup final. They were founded in 1946 under the name of Spartak and are not related to the 1939 Soviet cup semifinalists Dinamo Tashkent. Since independence Pakhtakor Toshkent won 9 Uzbek league championships, including six consecutive ones from 2002 to 2007, and sharing it in 1992 with Neftchi Fergana, as well as 11 Uzbek cups, including seven consecutive ones from 2001 to 2007; both numbers are records. Their six consecutive league-and-cup doubles from 2002 to 2007 are a world record they share with Dinamo Tbilisi (1991/92 to 1996/97) in Georgia.

Championship

Pakhtakor Tashkent 
Top-10 finishes (in 22 top level seasons)
1961    10.Pakhtakor Tashkent      30 11  8 11  44-61  30
1962     6.Pakhtakor Tashkent      22  9  5  8  24-33  23
1965    10.Pakhtakor Tashkent      32 10 12 10  34-40  32
1966     9.Pakhtakor Tashkent      36 10 18  8  36-32  38
1974     8.Pakhtakor Tashkent      30 10 10 10  45-44  30
1979     9.Pakhtakor Tashkent      34 11  9 14  42-53  30  [-1]
         NB: points were only awarded for the first 8 draws
1982     6.Pakhtakor Tashkent      34 13 11 10  42-38  36  [-1]
         NB: points were only awarded for the first 10 draws
1983    10.Pakhtakor Tashkent      34 13  9 12  37-34  35

Cup

1939: semifinal: Dinamo Tashkent         (0-3 vs Stalinets Leningrad)
1968: finalists: Pakhtakor Tashkent      (0-1 vs Torpedo Moscow)

Georgia

Abkhazia | South Ossetia

Abkhazian clubs in the Georgian football structure

When most clubs from Georgia withdrew from the Soviet championship after the 1989 season to enter an independent Georgian championship in 1990, various clubs from Abkhazia remained in the Soviet structure: Dinamo Sukhumi played at the second Soviet level in 1990 and 1991, and Dinamo Gagra at the fourth level 1991. Other clubs from the region did enter the Georgian league between 1990 and 1992/93. Abkhazia declared independence in 1992; in the ensuing war, Abkhazia, supported by Russia, defeated the Georgian army and a mass exodus of ethnic Georgians from the region followed. After a Georgian attack on the likewise separatist region of South Ossetia in 2008, Russia intervened, assumed military control over both regions and recognised their independence.

Since about 1994, Abkhazia organises an independent football championship. In 2005/06, a club called Dinamo Sukhumi but playing in Tbilisi entered the Premier League in Georgia, and FC Gagra entered it for the 2008/09 season after having played at the second Georgian level since 2005/06 (also staging home matches in Tbilisi), where Siharuli-90 Gagra had played in 1990 and 1991.

Only very limited information is available on the Abkhaz championships held since 1994; Dinamo Gagra, who played in the fourth Soviet division in 1991, finished third in the league in 2003, while FK Gagra (presumably a new name for Dinamo and not related to the club playing in the Georgian league structure) lost the 2006 cup final to Nart Sukhumi.

Championship

Tskhumi Sukhumi (4 top level seasons)
1990     7.Tskhumi Sukhumi         34 13 10 11  50-36  49
1991     6.Tskhumi Sukhumi         19  9  4  6  34-26  31
1991/92  2.Tskhumi Sukhumi         38 24  4 10  96-53  76
1992/93 17.Tskhumi Sukhumi         32  8  1 23  59-84  25

Mziuri Gali (3 top level seasons)
1990    13.Mziuri Gali             34 11  7 16  47-69  40
1991    14.Mziuri Gali             19  6  4  9  25-28  22
1991/92  7.Mziuri Gali             38 16  5 17  53-65  53

Amirani Ochamchira (3 top level seasons) 
1990    17.Amirani Ochamchira      34 10  7 17  36-55  37
1991    19.Amirani Ochamchira      19  4  6  9  27-37  18
1991/92 17.Amirani Ochamchira      38 13  8 17  48-56  47

FC Gagra (3 top level seasons)
2008/09  9.FC Gagra                30  7  7 16  23-48  28
2009/10 10.FC Gagra                30  5  9 22  30-59  24
2011/12 11.FC Gagra                22  6  3 13  21-32  21 [relegated after playoff]
NB: play in Tbilisi

Dinamo Sukhumi (1 top level season)
2005/06 15.Dinamo Sukhumi          30  5  3 22  26-70  18
NB: played in Tbilisi

Cup

1990: finalists: Tskhumi Sukhumi         (0-1 aet vs Guria Lanchkhuti)
      1/8 final: Mziuri Gali             (1-0, 2-4 vs Guria Lanchkhuti)
1992: finalists: Tskhumi Sukhumi         (1-3 vs Iberia Tbilisi)
      quarterf.: Mziuri Gali             (3-2, 1-2 vs Torpedo Kutaisi)
      quarterf.: Amirani Ochamchira      (1-1, 1-3 aet vs Tskhumi Sukhumi)
1993: 1/8 final: Tskhumi Sukhumi         (1-1, 1-5 vs Torpedo Kutaisi)
2006: 1/8 final: FC Gagra                (1-4, 0-0 vs Ameri Tbilisi)
      1/8 final: Dinamo Sukhumi          (0-2, 1-2 vs FC Borjomi)
2010: 1/8 final: FC Gagra                (1-2 vs Kolkheti Poti)
2011: winners:   FC Gagra                (1-0 aet vs Torpedo Kutaisi)
South Ossetian clubs in the Georgian football structure

Like Abchazia (and Abcharia), South Ossetia has been seeking independence from Georgia since the break-up of the Soviet Union. In spite of this, clubs from the capital Tskhinvali have entered the Georgian league structure, occasionally playing in the top flight, and there is no information on an independent league structure in the region.

Championship

Spartaki Tskhinvali (6 top level seasons)
2005/06 14.FC Tskhinvali           30  8  3 19  30-61  27
2007/08 11.Spartaki Tskhinvali     26  5  8 13  15-28  23
2008/09 10.Spartaki (Tskhinvali)   30  6  7 17  28-46  25 
2009/10  5.Spartaki (Tskhinvali)   36 11 10 15  44-58  43 
2010/11  9.Spartaki (Tskhinvali)   36  7 11 18  32-42  32 
2011/12 10.Spartaki (Tskhinvali)   22  6  6 10  22-32  24 [relegated after playoff]

NB: FC Tskhinvali played in Gori in 2005/06, and presumably
    did and do the same under their new name Spartaki.

Liahvi Tskhinvali (1 top level season)
1990    18.Liahvi Tskhinvali       34  0  0 34  11-135  0

Cup

2008: quarterf.: Spartaki Tskhinvali     (0-0, 1-2 vs Dinamo Tbilisi)
2009: 1/8 final: Spartaki Tskhinvali     (1-0, 1-3 vs Merani Martvili)
2010: semifinal: Spartaki Tskhinvali     (0-0, 0-3 vs Dinamo Tbilisi)
2011: quarterf.: Spartaki Tskhinvali     (0-1, 1-2 vs WIT Georgia Tbilisi)

Czechoslovakia

Czech Republic (1918-1938) | Czech Republic (1944-1993) | Slovakia (1918-1938) | Ukraine (1918-1938) | Slovakia (1944-1993)

Note that below we use the adjective 'Czech' to mean 'belonging to the area of the current Czech Republic'. In the Czech language itself, the corresponding adjective český originally referred to Bohemia (Čechý) only. Also note that the current Czech Republic does not only consist of the historical regions Bohemia and Moravia but also comprises a part of Silesia, with as most important towns Ostrava, Opava, Karviná and Havířov.

The former Czechoslovakia was both unified and split twice during its history, quite apart from various border changes concerning all of its neighbours (Germany, Hungary, Soviet Union/Ukraine and Poland). However, all the more important clubs came from the regions that are now the Czech Republic and Slovakia, and for each of them we will discuss those teams to win honours during the times the two countries were bound together. Between the wars, Czechoslovakia also comprised a part of the current Ukraine (Transcarpathia, with as main cities (names in Slovak) Užhorod, Berehovo and Mukačevo). War-time feats of clubs from both countries not part of the Bohemian-Moravian or Slovak league structures can be found above, under Germany (for Bohemian and Moravian clubs) and Hungary (for Slovak clubs).
Given the multitude of clubs involved, we proceed similarly as for the Russian and Ukrainian clubs with the Soviet Union - i.e. listing only the honours won by the various clubs. We distinguish two periods of common championships (from 1918 to 1938 and from 1944 to 1993) and three of separate championships (until 1918, from 1938 to 1944 and since 1993). However, given the almost complete lack of Slovak clubs at the Czechoslovak top level in the interbellum, all relevant top flight finishes of Slovak clubs in that period are listed.

Note that an official league championship was not created until 1925, together with the introduction of professional football in the country. Prior to that, regional championships were organised, followed by national championship playoffs on an irregular basis - in fact, on only four occasions: 1912, 1913, 1919 and 1922. All four were won by the champions of the Central Bohemian region, the středočeska župa, dominated by clubs from Prague. It is therefore customary to consider the winners of the Central Bohemian league as Czech champions (until 1917) or Czechoslovak champions (between 1918 and 1925; Slovakia was part of the Hungarian section of the Habsburg Empire until October 1918), also in the seasons without a national playoff, but officially this is not correct.
Moreover, the official league may have been professional, but it was not really national for almost a decade: from 1925 to 1933, only clubs from Bohemia (Prague/Praha/Prag, Teplice/Teplitz, Kladno) entered, none from Moravia or Slovakia, who played in regional amateur leagues (which organised a national amateur championship playoff during this period). However, in 1932/33, a Moravian club, SK Židenice Brno (national amateur champions in 1926), entered the second level of the Asociační Liga, won it and earned promotion to the first level 1933/34. They were then also one of two Moravian participants (along with SK Prostějov, national amateur champions in 1927/28) to enter the first truly national league, the Státní Liga, in its inaugural 1934/35 season. The first Slovak club, 1.ČsŠK Bratislava (national amateur champions in 1927 and 1929/30) entered in the following season.
Nevertheless, all champions since 1925 are considered official, as there is little doubt that the top (professional) Prague clubs (in particular Slavia and Sparta) were (far) superior to anything the rest of the country, which was divided among a host of regional and ethnic (German and Hungarian) leagues and federations, could offer. Similar observations can after all be made for other countries such as Austria (official league champions since 1911/12; first entry of clubs from outside Vienna (Wien) 1938/39), Hungary (official league champions since 1901; first entry of clubs from outside Budapest 1926/27) or Uruguay (first entry of clubs from outside Montevideo 1999!).

Czech clubs in the Czechoslovak football structure 1918-1938

Three Czech clubs won official or unofficial league championships between 1918 and 1938. Among those three, two won unofficial Bohemian titles prior to 1917: Slavia (8 championships, including a 1913 title which they confirmed in a national playoff) and Sparta (1 championship, in 1912, also confirmed in a national playoff). Both clubs also won championships in the league of the Protektorat Böhmen und Mähren, a peculiar war-time construction due to Nazi Germany: Slavia won 4 titles, Sparta 2.
Prior to World War II there was no cup competition for all of Czechoslovakia. There was a variety of cup tournaments for Central Bohemia, or just for Prague clubs (which regarding the winners amounted to the same thing, though provincial clubs occasionally reached the final of the Central Bohemian Středočeský Pohár). The first cup for all Czech clubs (more precisely, those from the Protektorat Böhmen und Mähren) was held in 1939/40 and promptly had two Moravian finalists (ASO Olomouc beating SK Prostějov 5-2 on aggregate); however, this was an anomaly as the remaining 4 cup tournaments organised in this war-time 'state' were all claimed by Slavia (the first two) and Sparta (the last two), and no Moravian teams reached the final.

Championship

Sparta Praha (10 championships, of which 5 official)
1919, 1920, 1921, 1922, 1923, 1926, 1927, 1932, 1936, 1938
NB: only the last 5 are official (professional) titles, but
    Sparta confirmed their 1919 and 1922 Central Bohemian 
    amateur titles by winning a national playoff

Slavia Praha (10 championships, of which 8 official)
1918, 1924, 1925, 1929, 1930, 1931, 1933, 1934, 1935, 1937
NB: the first 2 titles were not official

Viktoria Žižkov (1 championship)
1928

Cup

There was no national cup tournament.
Czech clubs in the Czechoslovak football structure 1944-1993

Eight Czech clubs won Czechoslovak league championships between 1944 and 1993. Among these clubs, both Slavia (4) and Sparta (2) won titles in the Protektorat Böhmen und Mähren between 1938 and 1944. Since 1993, three of these clubs have won titles in the Czech Republic: Sparta 12, Slavia 3 and Baník Ostrava 1. In the same period Sparta won 6 Czech cups, Slavia 3 and Baník Ostrava 1. The other Czech clubs to have won Czechoslovak league titles have not managed to do so in the Czech Republic.

In addition, four Czech clubs won Czechoslovak cups in the post-war period: Sparta Praha, Dukla Praha, Baník Ostrava and TJ Gottwaldov. Dukla reached one cup final in the independent Czech Republic (1997) and later were moved to Příbram and renamed Marila; they have not won any Czech honours. Spartak Hradec Králové won one Czech cup (as SK Hradec Králové; they are currently called FC Hradec Králové), while Bohemians, Vítkovice, Zbrojovka Brno (nowadays 1.FC Brno) and FC Zlín (the current name of TJ Gottwaldov after their home town reverted to its former name) have not won any Czech honours or reached a cup final.

We have refrained from listing all aliases under which clubs have been known.

Championship

Sparta Praha (14 championships)
1946, 1947, 1952, 1954, 1965, 1967, 1984, 1985, 1987, 1988,
1989, 1990, 1991, 1993

Dukla Praha (11 championships)
1953, 1956, 1958, 1961, 1962, 1963, 1964, 1966, 1977, 1979,
1982

Baník Ostrava (3 championships)
1976, 1980, 1981

Slavia Praha (1 championship)
1947
NB: Slavia also won the unofficial, transitional autumn league 1948.

Bohemians Praha (1 championship)
1983

Spartak Hradec Králové (1 championship)
1960

TJ Vítkovice (1 championship)
1986
   
Zbrojovka Brno  (1 championship)
1978

Cup

Sparta Praha (8 cups)
1964, 1972, 1976, 1980, 1984, 1988, 1989, 1992

Dukla Praha (8 cups)
1961, 1965, 1966, 1969, 1981, 1983, 1985, 1990

Baník Ostrava (3 cups)
1973, 1978, 1991

TJ Gottwaldov (1 cup)
1970
Slovak clubs in the Czechoslovak football structure 1918-1938

No Slovak clubs won official or unofficial league championships between 1918 and 1938. However, 1.ČsŠK Bratislava won national amateur titles in 1927 and 1930. Only one Slovak club ever entered the Czechoslovak state league: 1.ČsŠK Bratislava for three seasons. Below we list their league finishes.

Championship

1.ČsŠK Bratislava (3 league seasons)
1935/36  7.1.ČsŠK Bratislava       26 10  5 11  50-61  25
1936/37  4.1.ČsŠK Bratislava       22 11  5  6  44-36  27
1937/38  5.1.ČsŠK Bratislava       22 10  1 11  46-53  21
 
Cup

There was no national cup tournament.
Ukrainian clubs in the Czechoslovak football structure 1918-1938

The currently Ukrainian region Zakarpattya (Transcarpathia or Carpathian Ruthenia) belonged to Czechoslovakia during the interbellum, after having belonged to the Hungarian part of the Habsburg Empire prior to the Great War (as Kárpátalja). One club, Rusj Užhorod, played in the national league for one season. During the second World War, they were known as Ungvári Rusznyi and played at the lower levels of the Hungarian league structure (city rivals Ungvári AC won promotion to the Hungarian top level in 1944 but the 1944/45 season in which they competed lasted only 3 rounds before being abandoned). After the war, the club presumably was dissolved. No clubs from the region reached the first Soviet level, but Zakarpattya Uzhhorod have reached the top flight of independent Ukraine.

Apart from the participation of various clubs in the national Czechoslovak league structure, as detailed below, 18 regional championships were played during the interbellum, divided in Slavic and Hungarian sections. The Slavic winners were: ČsŠK Užhorod 8 titles, ŠK Rusj Užhorod 6 titles, ŠK Slavia Mukačevo and ŠK Rusj Chust with both 2 titles. The Hungarian winners were: Ungvári TK 6 titles, Ungvári AC, Ungvári MTE and Munkácsi SE, all with 3 titles, and Spartakus Palánk (from Munkács), Huszti SE and Királyhelmeci SC (from a town still in Slovakia), all with 1 title.

City name correspondences: 
Slovak           Ukrainian        Hungarian        Russian
Berehovo         Berehowe         Beregszász       Beregowo
Chust            Khust            Huszt            Khust
Kráľovský Chlmec Korolevs.Khlumcy Királyhelmec
Mukačevo         Mukacheve        Munkács          Mukachyovo
Užhorod          Uzhhorod         Ungvár           Uzhgorod

Championship

Rusj Užhorod (1 league season)
1936/37 11.Rusj Užhorod            22  3  2 17  24-79   8

Second level clubs from the region included: BFTC (Berehovo),
MSE (Munkácsi Sport Egyesület), Slavia and Slovan (all from
Mukačevo), UAC (Ungvári AC) and ČsŠK (both Užhorod).

Cup

There was no national cup tournament.

Slovak clubs in the Czechoslovak football structure 1944-1993

Three Slovak clubs won Czechoslovak league championships between 1944 and 1993. While the Czech clubs were dominant for most of this period, Slovak clubs won all league titles from 1968 to 1975, a stretch culminating in the 1976 win of the European championship with a team greatly influenced by Slovak players - an honour which should therefore not be credited to the current Czech Republic. A comparable case is the 1962 African Nations Cup won by Ethiopia, whose team at the time was dominated by Eritrean players.
Among the 3 clubs involved, one (Slovan) won championships in the war-time Slovak league (the country had been created by the nazis, not including areas near the border with Hungary which Hitler had handed to his Hungarian allies, see Slovak clubs in Hungary). Under their contemporary name of ŠK Bratislava (the new name for 1.ČsŠK Bratislava) they won 4 of the 6 league championships played.

In addition, five Slovak clubs won Czechoslovak cups in the post-war period: Slovan Bratislava, Spartak Trnava, Lokomotíva Košice, 1.FC Košice and DAC Dunajská Streda.
Since independence, both Slovan and Internacional have won Slovak league titles: Slovan a record 8, in addition to 6 Slovak cups (also a record), Internacional 2 around the turn of the millennium and 3 Slovak cups. Spartak Trnava lost out on the 1996/97 title due to a last round loss away to strugglers Rimavská Sobota, handing the championship on a silver platter to 1.FC Košice, who also pipped them for the league title by two points in the 1997/98 season. Spartak Trnava did win the cup that season, their only Slovak honour to date. 1.FC Košice won 2 Slovak league titles and 2 Slovak cups (as MFK Košice). DAC Dunajská Streda and Lokomotíva Košice have not won any honours in independent Slovakia.

We have refrained from listing all aliases under which clubs have been known.

Championship

Slovan Bratislava (8 championships)
1949, 1950, 1951, 1955, 1970, 1974, 1975, 1992

Spartak Trnava (5 championships)
1968, 1969, 1971, 1972, 1973

Internacional Bratislava (1 championship)
1959

Cup

Slovan Bratislava (5 cups)
1962, 1963, 1968, 1974, 1982

Spartak Trnava (4 cups)
1967, 1971, 1975, 1986

Lokomotíva Košice (2 cups)
1977, 1979

1.FC Košice (1 cup)
1993

DAC Dunajská Streda (1 cup)
1987

Romania

Bulgaria | Moldova | Ukraine

During the interbellum, Romania was larger than today. At the end of the Second Balkan War (1913), the Romanian kingdom consisting of the historical areas Walachia (Ţara Românească) and Moldavia (Moldova, west of the Prut river, not to be confused with the currently existing Republic of Moldova which is east of the same river) annexed the southern Dobrodgea region (Cadrilater in Romanian) from Bulgaria. In this region, Romanians were a minority (about 2 percent in 1910, nearly all living in Silistra and Turtucaia/Tutrakan, and between 20 and 25 percent between 1930 and 1940, with both Bulgarians and Turks forming significantly larger groups).
After the Great War 1914-1918, Romania managed to convince the Allies to enlarge it with several regions where Romanians formed the majority of the population, in particular Transylvania (Ardeal in Romanian, Erdély in Hungarian, Siebenbürgen in German) from the Hungarian part of the Habsburg Empire, the Bukovina (Bucovina in Romanian, Buchenland or Bukowina in German, Bukovyna in Ukrainian) from its Austrian part, and Bessarabia (Basarab) from the Russian Empire.
At the start of the second World War, in September 1940, Romania ceded the southern Dobrodgea to Bulgaria, a move followed by a 'population exchange', nearly all Romanians leaving the southern Dobrodgea and nearly all Bulgarians leaving the northern part.
After the second World War, Transylvania (which had partially gone to Hungary during the war) and the southern part of the Bukovina remained Romanian, but the northern Bukovina and Bessarabia were claimed by Stalin for the Soviet Union. Nowadays, the northern Bukovina lies in the Ukraine while Bessarabia roughly corresponds to the current Republic of Moldova (roughly - the Soviets are responsible for some illogical border changes between (the Republic of) Moldova and the Ukraine).
None of these areas played a major role in Romanian football between the wars, but as that was organised on a regional level until 1932, various clubs from the northern Bukovina and Bessarabia reached the semifinals of the national championship playoff, and one club from Cernăuţi, the main city in the Bukovina, played a season in the top national division.

Bulgarian clubs in the Romanian football structure

The Cadrilater was divided in two provinces (judeţe) during Romanian occupation, Durostor (with as main towns Silistra and Turtucaia) and Caliacra (with as main towns Balcic, Bazargic and Cavarna). Both provinces had one club playing at the Romanian third level: Gloria Venera CFR Bazargic in both 1936/37 and 1937/38, the only two seasons before the second World War in which a third level was organised, and Vifor Dristor Silistra in 1937/38. Another team from Bazargic was Avântul (which must have existed between 1938 and 1940 at least), and a Bazargic youth selection won the Cupa Virgil Tilea in 1940, defeating a youth selection from Bucureşti 1-0 in the final.

In Bulgarian football, only Bazargic (as Dobrich or Tolbukhin) and Cavarna (as Kavarna) were ever represented in the Bulgarian top level league, while Levski-Dorostol Silistra (possibly related to Vifor Dristor) entered the 1945 knock-out championship.

City name correspondences: 
Romanian         Bulgarian
Balcic           Balčik
Bazargic         Dobrich (Tolbukhin during communist times)
Cavarna          Kavarna
Silistra         Silistra
Turtucaia        Tutrakan

Championship

No club from the region played above the third level.

Cup

No club from the region reached the 1/16 finals of the Romanian cup.

Moldovan clubs in the Romanian football structure

Note that all clubs mentioned below are from Bessarabia (Basarab); apart from Traian Tighina, all are from the Bessarabian (and now Moldovan) capital Chişinău; Bessarabia only corresponds partially to the current Republic of Moldova and is but a part of the historical region of Moldavia (which also includes most of current Romania east of the Carpathian mountains, with as most important city the former Romanian capital Iaşi). Bessarabia did not include the area of currently secessionist Transdnistria (with as main city Tiraspol) but did contain the region between the current Republic of Moldova and the Black Sea, which now belongs to the Ukraine.

One club from Chişinău/Kishinev reached the first Soviet level, and of course many clubs from the region have played in the top flight of the current republic of Moldova, but none appear to be related to any of the interbellum clubs listed here.

Clubs from Chişinău reached the semifinals of the Romanian championship playoff on three occasions. After the introduction of a national league in 1932, no clubs from the region reached the Romanian top level. Sporting Chişinău played at the second level from 1934/35 to 1938/39, Mihai Viteazul Chişinău in 1938/39 and Nistru Chişinău (possibly a merger of the two former clubs, but apparently not related to the Nistru Kishinev club which played at the Soviet top level, as that club was founded (as Dynamo) in 1947) and Macabi Chişinău in the 1939/40 season. Finally, Traian Tighina played at the second level in 1938/39 and 1939/40 (in which season they withdrew at the halfway stage), after winning the eastern section of the third level in 1937/38.

City name correspondences: 
Romanian         Russian
Chişinău         Kishinev
Tighina          Bender
   
Championship (knock-out style)

1925: prel. rd.: Fulgerul CFR Chişinău   (2-0 vs Oltul Slatina, disqualified)
NB: Fulgerul had already played (and won) their quarterfinal (2-1 vs Jahn 
    Cernăuţi) before being disqualified for using an ineligible player
1926: semifinal: Fulgerul CFR Chişinău   (2-2, 1-4 vs Juventus Bucureşti)
1927: quarterf.: Mihai Viteazul Chişinău (4-4, 1-3 vs Unirea Tricolor Bucureşti)
1928: semifinal: Mihai Viteazul Chişinău (4-6 vs Coltea Braşov)
1929: prel. rd.: Mihai Viteazul Chişinău (0-1 vs Dragoş Vodă Cernăuţi)
1930: semifinal: Mihai Viteazul Chişinău (2-4 vs Juventus Bucureşti)
1931: prel. rd.: Mihai Viteazul Chişinău (1-3 vs Concordia Iaşi)

Cup

1937: 1/8 final: Sporting Chişinău       (1-3 vs Venus Bucureşti)
1939: 1/16 fin.: Mihai Viteazul Chişinău (1-9 vs Unirea Tricolor Bucureşti)
1940: 1/16 fin.: Macabi Chişinău         (1-4 vs AS Constanţa)
Ukrainian clubs in the Romanian football structure

Note that all clubs discussed below are from the northern Bukovina (in fact its capital Cernăuţi); the southern Bukovina (with as major city Suceava) is part of current Romania. The current Ukraine also comprises another region which was part of Romania in the interbellum, namely the southern section of Bessarabia (Basarab) bordering the Black Sea. The main cities of that region were (names in Romanian) Cetatea Albă, Ismail and Chilia, but no clubs from there made any impact in Romanian football.

No clubs from the region reached the first Soviet level, but Bukovyna Chernivtsy have played a few seasons in the top flight of independent Ukraine. They do not bear any relationship with the clubs listed below though.

The Romanian championship was organised in regional leagues whose best teams played off for the national championship until 1932; a first nationwide league (divided into two groups) was played in 1932/33. Clubs from Cernăuţi reached the semifinals of the national playoffs on five occasions, and one club, Dragoş Vodă Cernăuţi, played one season in the national league (1937/38; they had finished fourth in one of the two second division groups in the previous season and profited from the extension of the top flight from 12 to 20 clubs (organised in two groups of 10); they finished last in their group and were relegated). In addition, two clubs from the city played one or more seasons at the second level: Jahn Cernăuţi (1934/35-1938/39) and Muncitorul Cernăuţi (1939/40).
Dragoş Vodă Cernăuţi are also the only club from outside the current Romanian borders to have reached the quarterfinals of the Romanian cup.

City name correspondence: 
Romanian         Ukrainian        Russian          German
Cernăuţi         Chernivtsy       Chernovtsy       Czernowitz
Cetatea Albă     Bilhorod         Belgorod
Chilia           Kiliya           Kiliya
Ismail           Izmayil          Izmail
NB: Cetatea Albă/Belgorod/Bilhorod was known by its Turkish name
    Akkerman (also used in German) prior to the first World War; its
    full Ukrainian name is Bilhorod-Dnistrovs'kyi (correspondingly,
    in Russian the full name is Belgorod-Dnestrovskiy).

Championship (knock-out style)

1922: quarterf.: Polonia Cernăuţi        (0-1 vs Tricolor Bucureşti)
1923: quarterf.: Polonia Cernăuţi        (0-1 vs MTK Tîrgu Mureş)
1924: semifinal: Jahn Cernăuţi           (0-1 vs CA Oradea)
1925: semifinal: Jahn Cernăuţi           (1-3 vs UCAS Petroşani)
1926: quarterf.: Hackoah Cernăuţi        (0-1 vs Fulgerul CFR Chişinău)
1927: prel. rd.: Macabi Cernăuţi         (0-6 vs Mihai Viteazul Chişinău)
1928: quarterf.: Polonia Cernăuţi        (0-5 vs Mihai Viteazul Chişinău)
1929: semifinal: Dragoş Vodă Cernăuţi    (3-4 vs Venus Bucureşti)
1930: quarterf.: Dragoş Vodă Cernăuţi    (2-4 vs Mihai Viteazul Chişinău)
1931: semifinal: Macabi Cernăuţi         (2-4 vs SG Sibiu)
1932: semifinal: Macabi Hackoah Cernăuţi (0-5 vs Venus Bucureşti)

Championship (league)

1937/38 10.Dragoş Vodă Cernăuţi    18  4  0 14  26-57   8  [group B]

Cup

1935: 1/16 fin.: Jahn Cernăuţi           (0-4 vs CA Oradea)
      1/16 fin.: Macabi Cernăuţi         (0-4 vs SG Sibiu)
1936: 1/8 final: Dragoş Vodă Cernăuţi    (1-4 vs Universitatea Cluj)
1937: 1/8 final: Jahn Cernăuţi           (3-7 vs Rapid Bucureşti)
1938: 1/16 fin.: Dragoş Vodă Cernăuţi    (0-4 vs Phoenix Baia Mare)
1940: quarterf.: Dragoş Vodă Cernăuţi    (2-6 vs Sportul studenţesc Bucureşti)
      1/16 fin.: Caurom Cernăuţi         (1-9 vs Victoria Cluj)
1943: 1/8 final: Dragoş Vodă Cernăuţi    (0-4 vs FC Ploieşti)
1944: 1/16 fin.: Neptun and Dragoş Vodă Cernăuţi were to play each other
                 in the 1/16 finals, but the competition was abandoned

Yugoslavia

Bosnia and Herzegovina | Croatia | Kosovo (until 1999) | Kosovo (since 1999) | Macedonia | Montenegro (until 1992) | Montenegro (1992-2006) | Serbia (until 1992) | Serbia (since 1992) | Slovenia

Yugoslavia was created as the 'Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes' in 1918, and obtained its 'definite' interbellum borders in 1920. These essentially corresponded to those of Yugoslavia after the second World War (during which the Croats had obtained nominal independence after the axis powers had dissolved the state). The federation underwent a slow and bloody disintegration in the 1990s, with Slovenia and Croatia declaring independence in June 1991, followed by Macedonia a few months later; Bosnia-Herzegovina officially declared independence in February 1992 but had to suffer a war in the mid-90s before the situation 'stabilised'. Finally, the last two republics forming the original federation, Serbia and Montenegro, split in 2006 when Montenegro declared independence. The Kosovo, where Albanians form the overwhelming majority of the population, was one of two autonomous regions within Serbia during communist times (the other was the Vojvodina, split between Hungary and Croatia during the second world war and providing one club to the Hungarian top flight for a few seasons and one to the Croatian top flight for one season), and declared independence in 1991. While the corresponding declarations of the former constituent republics tended to be recognised by the western world fast, that of the Kosovo (Kosova in Albanian) was not (a later declaration in February 2008 was meanwhile recognised by a number of countries but not universally accepted). The NATO intervened in 1999 by starting a war on Yugoslavia (as the state consisting of Serbia and Montenegro was still called) and the Kosovo ended up under UN administration controlled by NATO troops.

As Yugoslav football was dominated by clubs from Serbia and Croatia, we treat those two regions similarly as Russia and the Ukraine in the Soviet era, while the other regions obtain the same treatment as the other 13 former Soviet republics. As Kosovo clubs now play their own competition (even if not recognised by any official football body), they (like Northern Cyprus) are treated as a separate entity here.
We will use Yugoslavia only for the entity before the 1991/92 split-ups, including the 1991/92 season in which the 'Yugoslav' league still comprised clubs from Macedonia and Bosnia-Herzegovina (but not from Croatia or Slovenia). From 1992/93 up to and including 2005/06 only teams from Serbia and Montenegro entered, apart from the token participation by Borac Banja Luka (then playing home matches in Belgrade and Valjevo) in 1992/93. This includes the two entries (1992/93 and 1998/99) by FK Priština (who played at the second and third Serbian levels between 1993 and 1998; after 1999 no Kosovar clubs have played above the fourth level of the Serbian league structure); we will therefore use Serbia-Montenegro for the entire period from 1992 to 2006, even if this name only became official in February 2003 (and as such only lasted for three years). The case of a club from Trieste/Trst playing in the Yugoslav league shortly after World War II is discussed in the section on moving borders.

Bosnian and Herzegovinan clubs in the Yugoslav football structure 1923-1992

A muslim-only league started in 1994/95, and Čelik Zenica won the first 3 editions; from 1997/98 to 1999/00, the best clubs from the Muslim league played off with the best clubs from the Croat league, which saw both Željezničar (1997/98) and Sarajevo (1998/99) win their first Bosnian titles. In 2000/01 the two leagues merged completely, and Željezničar won the first two editions of the combined league before Serbian clubs also joined from the 2002/03 season on. Since then, Sarajevo won the league in 2006/07 and Željezničar in 2009/10, 2011/12 and 2012/13, while the 2004/05 and 2013/14 titles went to Zrinjski Mostar, who played in the Croatian war-time league - if they are really the same club. Borac Banja Luka won the 2000/01 league of the 'Republik Srpska' (which merged in 2002 into the all-Bosnian league) and the 2010/11 championship of the official championship.
Željezničar won 5 editions of the cup, eternal rivals Sarajevo 4 (i.e. the FSBiH cup competition, in existence since 1997/98), and Borac Banja Luka one; Sloboda Tuzla were losing finalists in 2008 and Čelik Zenica in 2011 and 2014 (after having won the first two 'Muslim' cups in 1995 and 1996, the latter in a final against Sloboda Tuzla; likewise, Borac Banja Luka won the Srpska cups of 1995 and 1996. None of the other clubs have reached the final of the cup.

It is unclear whether pre-war Slavija Sarajevo are related to the current Slavija Istočno Sarajevo; SAŠK Sarajevo (who played, with other Bosnian clubs, in the war-time Croatian league) and Krajišnik Banja Luka have been dissolved while Velež Mostar and Iskra Bugojno so far failed to win any honours since independence.

Championship

Championships in knock-out style

1923: finalists: SAŠK Sarajevo           (1-1, 2-4 vs Građanski Zagreb)
1924: semifinal: SAŠK Sarajevo           (1-6 vs Hajduk Split)
1925: quarterf.: SAŠK Sarajevo           (0-6 vs Građanski Zagreb)
1926: quarterf.: SAŠK Sarajevo           (1-2 vs Hajduk Split)
1936: finalists: Slavija Sarajevo        (1-1, 0-1 vs BSK Beograd)
      quarterf.: Krajišnik Banja Luka    (1-3, 1-4 vs Ljubljana)

Championships in league style

Sarajevo
Top-5 finishes (in 43 top level seasons)
1950     5.Sarajevo                18  7  3  8  30-27  17
1963/64  4.Sarajevo                26 11  7  8  47-37  29
1964/65  2.Sarajevo                28 15  5  8  52-38  35
1966/67  1.Sarajevo                30 18  6  6  51-29  42
1978/79  4.Sarajevo                34 17  5 12  56-53  39
1979/80  2.Sarajevo                34 17  7 10  55-41  41
1981/82  4.Sarajevo                34 16  7 11  57-54  39
1984/85  1.Sarajevo                34 19 10  5  51-30  48
NB: both Sarajevo's league championships came immediately after a
    season in which they had finished 9th; they also failed to
    confirm their status in the seasons after their title wins,
    finishing 6th in 1967/68 and 15th(!) in 1985/86.

Velež Mostar
Top-5 finishes (in 38 top level seasons)
1962/63  4.Velež Mostar            26 10  8  8  33-31  28
1965/66  3.Velež Mostar            30 14  7  9  48-37  35
1969/70  3.Velež Mostar            34 17  9  8  64-44  43
1972/73  2.Velež Mostar            34 17 12  5  48-27  46
1973/74  2.Velež Mostar            34 19  7  8  54-34  45
1974/75  4.Velež Mostar            34 15  9 10  62-35  39
1978/79  5.Velež Mostar            34 15  8 11  50-41  38
1985/86  3.Velež Mostar            34 13 11 10  64-50  37
1986/87  2.Velež Mostar            34 19  4 11  65-46  42
1987/88  3.Velež Mostar            34 15 12  7  61-34  42

Željezničar Sarajevo
Top-5 finishes (in 34 top level seasons)
1962/63  3.Željezničar Sarajevo    26 11  7  8  49-31  29
1964/65  5.Željezničar Sarajevo    28 13  7  8  39-30  33
1967/68  5.Željezničar Sarajevo    30 12  9  9  44-34  33
1968/69  5.Željezničar Sarajevo    34 15  8 11  51-38  38
1969/70  4.Željezničar Sarajevo    34 17  9  8  52-33  43
1970/71  2.Željezničar Sarajevo    34 18  9  7  59-34  45
1971/72  1.Željezničar Sarajevo    34 21  9  4  55-20  51
1972/73  5.Željezničar Sarajevo    34 18  6 10  59-41  42
1981/82  5.Željezničar Sarajevo    34 16  6 12  52-37  38
1983/84  3.Željezničar Sarajevo    34 15 12  7  52-35  42

Sloboda Tuzla
Top-8 finishes (in 25 top level seasons)
1971/72  7.Sloboda Tuzla           34 12 11 11  34-33  35
1972/73  6.Sloboda Tuzla           34  8 18  8  34-32  34
1974/75  7.Sloboda Tuzla           34 12 12 10  41-45  36
1975/76  6.Sloboda Tuzla           34 11 11 12  46-42  33
1976/77  3.Sloboda Tuzla           34 14 11  9  43-32  39
1977/78  6.Sloboda Tuzla           34 15  5 14  47-46  35
1978/79  8.Sloboda Tuzla           34 11 10 13  34-34  32
1979/80  6.Sloboda Tuzla           34 13  9 12  44-37  35
1980/81  4.Sloboda Tuzla           34 14  8 12  46-51  36
1982/83  6.Sloboda Tuzla           34 12 11 11  44-33  35
1987/88  5.Sloboda Tuzla           34 14 10 10  53-41  38

Čelik Zenica
Top-10 finishes (in 17 top level seasons)
1968/69  9.Čelik Zenica            34 11 11 12  42-41  33
1970/71  9.Čelik Zenica            34 14  8 12  35-32  36
1973/74  6.Čelik Zenica            34 12 11 11  30-28  35

Borac Banja Luka
Top-10 finishes (in 15 top level seasons)
1975/76 10.Borac Banja Luka        34  9 14 11  34-40  32
1976/77  6.Borac Banja Luka        34 14  8 12  53-43  36
1990/91  4.Borac Banja Luka        36 14 11 11  42-38  35  [-4]
         NB: drawn matches were decided by penalties, with only 
             the shootout winners obtaining a point
1991/92  8.Borac Banja Luka        33 11 10 12  24-32  28  [-4]
         NB: drawn matches were decided by penalties, with only 
             the shootout winners obtaining a point

Slavija Sarajevo (6 seasons)
1930     5.Slavija Sarajevo        10  2  2  6  15-23   6
1932/33  9.Slavija Sarajevo        20  7  2 11  37-48  16
1934/35  8.Slavija Sarajevo        18  7  1 10  26-34  15
1936/37  5.Slavija Sarajevo        18  7  3  8  36-40  17
1937/38  5.Slavija Sarajevo        18  7  4  7  25-28  18
1938/39  7.Slavija Sarajevo        22  7  5 10  34-43  19

SAŠK Sarajevo (3 seasons)
1927     5.SAŠK Sarajevo            5  2  0  3  12-13   4
1928     4.SAŠK Sarajevo            5  2  1  2  10- 7   5
1930/31  5.SAŠK Sarajevo           10  4  0  6  18-28   8

Iskra Bugojno (1 season)
1984/85 17.Iskra Bugojno           34  8 11 15  32-50  27

Cup

1958: finalists: Velež Mostar            (0-4 vs Crvena zvezda Beograd)
1967: finalists: Sarajevo                (1-2 vs Hajduk Split)
1971: finalists: Sloboda Tuzla           (0-4, 0-2 vs Crvena zvezda Beograd)
1974: finalists: Borac Banja Luka        (0-1 vs Hajduk Split)
1981: winners:   Velež Mostar            (3-2 vs Željezničar Sarajevo)
1981: finalists: Željezničar Sarajevo    (2-3 vs Velež Mostar)
1983: finalists: Sarajevo                (2-3 vs Dinamo Zagreb)
1986: winners:   Velež Mostar            (3-1 vs Dinamo Zagreb)
1988: winners:   Borac Banja Luka        (1-0 vs Crvena zvezda Beograd)
1989: finalists: Velež Mostar            (1-6 vs Partizan Beograd)
Croatian clubs in the Yugoslav football structure 1923-1991

Since independence, Dinamo Zagreb (temporarily called Croatia) won 16 league championships and 12 cups, both records, and Hajduk Split 6 championships and 6 cups. Rijeka added 3 Croatian cups to their 2 Yugoslav ones.

In the thirties, ČŠK from Čakovec entered the Slovenian regional league. In 1937/38 they won the Ljubljanska podsavez and entered the promotion playoffs for entering the Yugoslav top level but were eliminated by Krajišnik (Banja Luka). During the second world war, the same club entered the Hungarian league structure.

Championship

Hajduk Split (9 championships)
1927, 1929, 1950, 1952, 1955, 1972, 1974, 1975, 1979

Građanski Zagreb (5 championships)
1923, 1926, 1928, 1937, 1940

Dinamo Zagreb (4 championships)
1948, 1954, 1958, 1982

Concordia Zagreb (2 championships)
1930, 1932

HAŠK Zagreb (1 championship)
1938

Cup

Hajduk Split (9 cups)
1967, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1976, 1977, 1984, 1987, 1991

Dinamo Zagreb (7 cups)
1951, 1970, 1963, 1965, 1969, 1980, 1983

Rijeka (2 cups)
1978, 1979
Kosovar clubs in the Yugoslav football structure until 1999

Titova Mitrovica was later renamed Kosovska Mitrovica; the Albanian version of the town's name is Mitrovicë, and likewise Priština corresponds to Prishtinë. A club called Prishtina won 7 Kosovar championships since 1999 (and 2 more in 1996 and 1997), as well as 2 cup tournaments, but it is not directly related to the Priština listed below, which played in the league structure of Yugoslavia (c.q. Serbia and Montenegro) until 1998/99.
The top level of the Kosovar league currently contains two teams from Mitrovicë, Trepça '89 (2011/12 cup winners) and Trepça (2009/10 champions), but apparently neither is directly related to the 1978 Yugoslav cup finalists, as a club called Trepča Kosovska Mitrovica still played at the fourth level (Šumadijska Zona) of the Serbian league structure in 2006/07 (they were relegated at the end of that season due to merging of the Šumadijska and Moravička zones into the Zonska liga Morava for 2007/08; city rivals Partizan Kosovska Mitrovica earned promotion to that new structure, finishing 9th).

City name correspondences: 
Serbian          Albanian
Mitrovica        Mitrovicë
Priština         Prishtinë

Championship

Priština (7 top level seasons)
1983/84  8.Priština                34 15  3 16  36-55  33
1984/85 10.Priština                34 13  6 15  44-49  32
1985/86 11.Priština                34 13  6 15  37-47  32
1986/87 14.Priština                34 11  7 16  35-48  29
1987/88 18.Priština                34 10  7 17  43-59  27
1992/93 18.Priština                36  7  9 20  32-64  23
1998/99 17.Priština                24  5  3 16  25-49  18
NB: the 1998/99 season was abandoned after the NATO attack on Serbia,
    and the table after 24 (from 34) rounds was declared final

Trepča Titova Mitrovica
1977/78 18.Trepča Titova Mitrovica 34  7 10 17  28-52  24 

Cup

1978: finalists: Trepča Titova Mitrovica (0-1 aet vs Rijeka)
Kosovar clubs in the Serbo-Montenegrin football structure since 1999

Since the NATO attack on Serbia in 1999, no Kosovar clubs have played above the 4th level of the league structure of Serbia and Montenegro anymore, but clubs from the northern part of Kosovo have entered the Serbian league structure both before and after the 2008 Kosovar declaration of independence. Until the 2008/09 season, clubs from the region had a fixed place in the round of 32 of the Serbian cup tournament (since 2009/10 they have to enter a preliminary round prior to this stage, but both Partizan Kosovska Mitrovica and Mokra Gora Zubin Potok managed to qualify once since), and there is a fifth level regional league (Liga Severnog Kosova) which serves as a feeder for the fourth level Zonska Liga Morava.

City name correspondences: 
Serbian          Albanian
Leposavić        Leposaviq (or Albaniku)
Mitrovica        Mitrovicë
Priština         Prishtinë
Zubin Potok      Zubin Potoku

Cup

Since 1999/00
2000: 1/16 fin.: Priština                (withdrew vs Mogren Budva)
2002: 1/16 fin.: Ibar Leposavić          (0-3 vs Vojvodina Novi Sad)
2003: 1/16 fin.: Rudar Kos. Mitrovica    (0-6 vs Zemun)
2004: 1/16 fin.: Trepča Kos. Mitrovica   (0-0 aet, 0-3 pen vs Zemun) 
2005: 1/16 fin.: Mokra Gora Zubin Potok  (1-5 vs Obilić)
2006: 1/16 fin.: Mokra Gora Zubin Potok  (0-3 vs OFK Beograd)
2007: 1/8 final: Mokra Gora Zubin Potok  (1-2 vs Crvena zvezda Beograd)
2008: 1/16 fin.: Mokra Gora Zubin Potok  (1-1 aet, 3-4 pen vs Zemun) 
2009: 1/16 fin.: Partizan Kos. Mitrovica (1-3 vs Borac Čačak)
2010: 1/8 final: Partizan Kos. Mitrovica (1-3 vs OFK Beograd)
2011: 1/16 fin.: Mokra Gora Zubin Potok  (0-0, 8-9 pen vs Smederevo) 

Macedonian clubs in the Yugoslav football structure 1923-1991

In 1947, Pobeda Skopje (called Građanski until 1939) merged with Makedonija Skopje (see Macedonian clubs in Bulgaria) to form Vardar Skopje, the strongest Macedonian club in the communist era, who could call themselves Yugoslav champions for a few months following the 1986/87 season. Since independence, Vardar have won 7 league championships and 5 cups in Macedonia, both records; Rabotnički (now Rabotnički Kometal) have won 3 championships and 1 cup. Pelister Bitola have won one Macedonian cup (in 2001) and lost 2 more cup finals. Teteks Tetovo have not played a major role in independent Macedonia, suffering relegation in its first league season (1992/93), but they returned to the top level in 2009 and lost the cup final in 2011; meanwhile town rivals Škendija (or Shkëndia in the Albanian version of the name) won the 2010/11 league championship.

Championship

Championships in knock-out style

1936: quarterf.: Građanski Skopje        (2-1, 1-10 vs Slavija Sarajevo) 

Championships in league style

Vardar Skopje
Top-8 finishes (in 34 top level seasons)
1947/48  8.Vardar Skopje           18  5  4  9  22-39  14
1952     7.Vardar Skopje           16  7  1  8  21-33  15  (group and playoff)
1957/58  7.Vardar Skopje           26 10  6 10  30-44  26
1966/67  8.Vardar Skopje           30 13  5 12  41-44  31
1967/68  6.Vardar Skopje           30 10 10 10  31-37  30
1979/80  7.Vardar Skopje           34 10 15  9  43-41  35
1982/83  8.Vardar Skopje           34 13  9 12  43-47  35
1984/85  5.Vardar Skopje           34 15  5 13  67-58  37
1985/86  8.Vardar Skopje           34 14  6 14  52-59  34
1986/87  5.Vardar Skopje           34 15  8 11  40-39  38
        NB: due to point deductions for 10 from 18 clubs, Vardar had
            finished first and entered the 1987/88 Champions Cup, but
            later the deductions were revoked and Vardar finished 5th.
1987/88  6.Vardar Skopje           34 15  7 12  37-40  37
1991/92  6.Vardar Skopje           33 15  6 12  50-34  34  [-2]
         NB: drawn matches were decided by penalties, with only 
             the shootout winners obtaining a point

Rabotnički Skopje (2 top level seasons)
1952    11.Rabotnički Skopje       16  4  2 10  19-44  10  (group and playoff)
1954    14.Rabotnički Skopje       26  4  3 19  20-88  11  
    
Građanski/Pobeda Skopje (2 top level seasons)
1938/39 10.Građanski Skopje        22  7  2 13  31-57  16
1946/47  8.Pobeda Skopje           26  8  6 12  41-49  22 

Teteks Tetovo (1 top level season)
1981/82 17.Teteks Tetovo           34  8  9 19  31-68  23 
  
Pelister Bitola (1 top level season)
1991/92 15.Pelister Bitola         33  9  3 21  30-57  20  [-1]
         NB: drawn matches were decided by penalties, with only 
             the shootout winners obtaining a point

Cup

1961: winners:   Vardar Skopje           (2-1 vs Varteks Varaždin)

Montenegrin clubs in the Yugoslav football structure 1923-1992

What happened to Crnogorac Cetinje after World War II is not known, presumably they were dissolved. For further comments, see the 1992-2006 section.

Championship

Championships in knock-out style

1936: 1/8 final: Crnogorac Cetinje       (3-3, 1-2 vs Slavija Sarajevo) 

Championships in league style

Budućnost Titograd/Podgorica
Top-8 finishes (in 26 top level seasons)
1948/49  6.Budućnost Titograd      18  6  4  8  29-36  16
1978/79  6.Budućnost Titograd      34 15  8 11  33-36  38
1980/81  6.Budućnost Titograd      34 11 12 11  38-34  34
1981/82  8.Budućnost Titograd      34 13  8 13  47-44  34
1986/87  7.Budućnost Titograd      34 14  9 11  40-36  37

Sutjeska Nikšić (9 top level seasons)
1964/65 15.Sutjeska Nikšić         28  6  7 15  31-57  19
1966/67 15.Sutjeska Nikšić         30  8  6 16  30-58  22
1971/72 16.Sutjeska Nikšić         34  9 10 15  25-39  28
1972/73 18.Sutjeska Nikšić         34  9  7 18  32-49  25
1984/85  9.Sutjeska Nikšić         34 11 11 12  41-42  33
1985/86 10.Sutjeska Nikšić         34 14  4 16  55-61  32
1986/87 10.Sutjeska Nikšić         34 12 10 12  50-52  34
1987/88 17.Sutjeska Nikšić         34 10  9 15  42-49  29
1991/92 13.Sutjeska Nikšić         33 11  6 16  40-47  23  [-5]
         NB: drawn matches were decided by penalties, with only 
             the shootout winners obtaining a point

Cup

1965: finalists: Budućnost Titograd      (1-2 vs Dinamo Zagreb)
1977: finalists: Budućnost Titograd      (0-2 aet vs Hajduk Split)
Montenegrin clubs in the Serbo-Montenegrin football structure 1992-2006

Montenegro started its first independent league in 2006/07. The first honours were won by Zeta Golubovci (champions; they also were the Montenegrin club with the best ever final placing in the Serbo-Montenegrin league when they finished 3rd in 2004/05) and Rudar Pljevlja (cup winners; they are the only Montenegrin club to have reached the quarterfinals of the Serbo-Montenegrin cup on two separate occasions). The second cup tournament, in 2007/08, was won by Mogren Budva, claiming the trophy on penalties in a final against Budućnost Podgorica, who thereby also lost their third national cup final after those of Yugoslavia in 1965 and 1977 (when their home town was called Titograd); Budućnost later claimed the 2007/08 and 2011/12 league titles, Mogren Budva those of 2008/09 and 2010/11, and Sutjeksa Nikšić that of 2012/13 and 2013/14, with OFK Petrovac winning the 2008/09 cup. Rudar Pljevlja won the league-and-cup double in 2009/10, defeating Budućnost in the cup final; the latter thereby lost their fourth national cup final as well (they finally won their fifth in 2012/13). Rudar defended their cup title 2010/11, with champions Mogren the losing finalists. All seven Montenegrin clubs who ever played in the Serbo-Montenegrin league played at the first Macedonian level in the inaugural 2006/07 season, in which Jedinstvo Bijelo Polje were relegated to the second level, where they joined Čelik Nikšić, cup quarterfinalists in 2000 (and Montenegrin cup winners in 2011/12, a season in which they also won promotion to the top level). Jedinstvo returned to the top flight for the 2008/09 season but again only lasted one season. Five of the other six clubs (Budućnost, Sutjeska, Zeta, Mogren and Rudar) have never yet played outside of the Montenegrin top level; Kom Podgorica were relegated in 2009/10.

Championship

NB: the 3 seasons from 1993/94 to 1995/96 had 2 10-team divisions,
    1/A and 1/B, with the bottom-4 of the first after the autumn
    season being exchanged with the top-4 of the second, with
    bonus points regulating the starting positions for the spring
    season in which the championship was decided; only participations
    in the 1/A division are considered top level appearances here.

Budućnost Podgorica (9.5 top level seasons)
1992/93 10.Budućnost Podgorica     36 14  8 14  44-48  36
1993 aut 6.Budućnost Podgorica     18  6  6  6  17-26  18
1994 spr 7.Budućnost Podgorica     18  7  2  9  21-33  23
1995 aut10.Budućnost Podgorica     18  2  3 13  14-40   9
1996/97 10.Budućnost Podgorica     33 11  6 16  26-44  39
1997/98  8.Budućnost Podgorica     33  8  9 16  27-53  33
1998/99 14.Budućnost Podgorica     24  7  5 12  28-42  26
1999/00 12.Budućnost Podgorica     40 15  7 18  45-45  52
2000/01 15.Budućnost Podgorica     34 11  5 18  29-48  38
2004/05  6.Budućnost Podgorica     30 12  5 13  37-37  41
2005/06 14.Budućnost Podgorica     30  6 10 14  24-43  25  [-3]

Sutjeska Nikšić (7 top level seasons)
1992/93 16.Sutjeska Nikšić         36 11  7 18  46-67  29
1999/00  5.Sutjeska Nikšić         40 17  9 14  50-50  60
2000/01  7.Sutjeska Nikšić         34 14  4 16  52-64  46
2001/02 11.Sutjeska Nikšić         34 14  4 16  32-45  46 
2002/03  4.Sutjeska Nikšić         34 19  5 10  43-32  62
2003/04  8.Sutjeska Nikšić         30 12  4 14  38-36  40
2004/05 15.Sutjeska Nikšić         30  5  7 18  21-48  22

Zeta Golubovci (6 top level seasons)
2000/01 13.Zeta Golubovci          34 11  9 14  38-50  42
2001/02  5.Zeta Golubovci          34 15  7 12  48-50  52
2002/03  8.Zeta Golubovci          34 15  6 13  51-43  51  
2003/04 11.Zeta Golubovci          30 10  6 14  38-41  36
2004/05  3.Zeta Golubovci          30 18  5  7  52-30  59
2005/06  5.Zeta Golubovci          30 14  5 11  42-36  47

Mogren Budva (4 top level seasons)
1992/93 13.Mogren Budva            36 12  7 17  46-52  31
1998/99 15.Mogren Budva            24  4  8 12  18-42  20
1999/00 19.Mogren Budva            40 13  5 22  40-70  44
2002/03 16.Mogren Budva            34  5  6 23  33-76  21

Rudar Pljevlja (2.5 top level seasons)
1994 aut 9.Rudar Pljevlja          18  2  6 10  12-28  10
2001/02  7.Rudar Pljevlja          34 13  8 13  35-33  47
2002/03 17.Rudar Pljevlja          34  4  6 24  19-62  18

Kom Podgorica (1 top level season)
2003/04 16.Kom Podgorica           30  4  2 24  21-67  14

Jedinstvo Bijelo Polje (1 top level season)
2005/06 16.Jedinstvo Bijelo Polje  30  3  2 25  18-72  11 

Cup

No Montenegrin team ever reached the semifinals of the cup
tournament between 1992/93 and 2005/06.

1993: quarterf.: Budućnost Podgorica     (1-1, 2-2 vs Zastava Kragujevac)
1993: quarterf.: Sutjeska Nikšić         (2-1, 0-2 vs Crvena zvezda Beograd)
1995: quarterf.: Rudar Pljevlja          (3-3, 0-1 vs Bečej) 
2000: quarterf.: Čelik Nikšić            (0-5 vs Zemun)
2001: quarterf.: Zeta Golubovci          (1-3 vs Mladost Apatin)
2003: quarterf.: Rudar Pljevlja          (1-2 vs Sartid Smederevo) 
Serbian clubs in the Yugoslav football structure 1923-1992

For honours of Serbian clubs since the disintegration of the former Yugoslavia, see the next section. Pre-war BSK Beograd, losing semi-finalists of the 1939 and 1940 Mitropa-Cups, were dissolved in 1945. A new club, Metalac Beograd, was created, which was renamed BSK Beograd in 1950, OSD Beograd in 1957 and OFK Beograd in 1959. Jugoslavija Beograd were dissolved in 1943.

Note that some clubs from towns currently in Serbia (Subotica in the Vojvodina and Zemun) played in the war-time Kroatian league structure, while a club from Novi Sad, the capital of the Vojvodina, spent some seasons in the Hungarian league.

Championship

Crvena zvezda Beograd (19 championships)
1951, 1953, 1956, 1957, 1959, 1960, 1964, 1968, 1969, 1970,
1973, 1977, 1980, 1981, 1984, 1988, 1990, 1991, 1992

Partizan Beograd (11 championships)
1947, 1949, 1961, 1962, 1963, 1965, 1976, 1978, 1983, 1986,
1987
NB: Partizan won the 1986 and 1987 titles after lengthy legal procedures; 
    originally, Crvena zvezda had been declared 1986 champions and Vardar
    Skopje 1987 champions, and those two clubs participated in the UEFA
    Champions Cups of 1986/87 and 1987/88 respectively.

BSK Beograd (5 championships)
1931, 1933, 1935, 1936, 1939

Vojvodina Novi Sad (2 championships)
1966, 1989

Jugoslavija Beograd (2 championships)
1924, 1925

Cup

Crvena zvezda Beograd (12 cups)
1948, 1949, 1950, 1958, 1959, 1964, 1968, 1970, 1971, 1982,
1985, 1990

Partizan Beograd (6 cups)
1947, 1952, 1954, 1957, 1989, 1992

OFK Beograd (4 cups, includes BSK)
1953, 1955, 1962, 1966
NB: first two cups won as BSK
Serbian clubs since 1992

Given the dominance of Serbian clubs in the Serbo-Montenegrin league, we decline making a distinction between that set-up from 1992 to 2006 and the current separate Serbian league started in 2006/07 (likewise we refrain from distinguishing between (the league structures of) West Germany and the current Germany, following UEFA and FIFA in this). Below we just list all Serbian clubs to win domestic honours from the 1992/93 season onwards.

Championship

Partizan Beograd (14 championships)
1993, 1994, 1996, 1997, 1999, 2002, 2003, 2005, 2008, 2009, 
2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

Crvena zvezda Beograd (7 championships)
1995, 2000, 2001, 2004, 2006, 2007, 2014

Obilić (1 championship)
1998

Cup

Crvena zvezda Beograd (12 cups)
1993, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1999, 2000, 2002, 2004, 2006, 2007, 
2010, 2012

Partizan Beograd (6 cups)
1994, 1998, 2001, 2008, 2009, 2011

Sartid Smederevo (1 cup) [now called Smederevo]
2003

Železnik Beograd (1 cup)
2005
Slovenian clubs in the Yugoslav football structure 1923-1991

Olimpija Ljubljana (called Odred from 1948 to 1961) won the first four championships of independent Slovenia and also collected 4 cups; however, at the end of the 2004/05 season they were forcibly relegated to the amateur leagues and the club as such was dissolved. A new club called NK Bežigrad, named after the stadium and district in which Olimpija played, was then established; they reached the third Slovenian league in 2007/08, under the name of Olimpija Bežigrad, playing in the western group (3. SNL - zahod), meeting Izola Argeta among others. At the end of the season, they were promoted, and after playing only one season (2008/09) in the second level under the old name of Olimpija Ljubljana they earned promotion to the top flight.
Maribor have won 9 Slovenian championships and 6 cups, both records.
Ilirija Ljubljana and Primorje Ljubljana merged in 1936 to form (NK) Ljubljana (different from SŠK Ljubljana below, a club founded 1925 and dissolved 1940); the merger club went through a long sequence of name chances and may or may not be related to current Interblock Ljubljana.
Nafta Lendava, from a town occupied by Hungary during World War II, have not won any honours in independent Slovenia but currently play in the first division.

For the particular case of a club from the city of Trieste/Trst, which partially belonged to Slovenia shortly after World War II, competing in Yugoslavia, see the section on moving borders.

Championship

Championships in knock-out style

1923: quarterf.: Ilirija Ljubljana       (1-2 vs Građanski Zagreb)
1924: quarterf.: Ilirija Ljubljana       (1-3 vs SAŠK Sarajevo)
1925: quarterf.: Ilirija Ljubljana       (0-3 vs Bačka Subotica)
1926: quarterf.: Ilirija Ljubljana       (1-7 vs Građanski Zagreb)
1936: semifinal: SŠK Ljubljana           (1-3, 1-3 vs BSK Beograd)

Championships in league style

Olimpija Ljubljana (includes Odred Ljubljana)
Top-10 finishes (in 22 top level seasons)
1965/66  8.Olimpija Ljubljana      30 11  7 12  43-47  29
1970/71  7.Olimpija Ljubljana      34 13 10 11  47-35  36
1971/72  9.Olimpija Ljubljana      34 13  5 16  46-51  31
1973/74 10.Olimpija Ljubljana      34 11 10 13  36-42  32
1977/78 10.Olimpija Ljubljana      34 13  6 15  44-44  32
1981/82  9.Olimpija Ljubljana      34  9 15 10  39-38  33
1982/83  7.Olimpija Ljubljana      34 11 13 10  33-31  35
1989/90  8.Olimpija Ljubljana      34 14  6 14  49-40  30  [-4]
         NB: drawn matches were decided by penalties, with only 
             the shootout winners obtaining a point

Maribor (5 top level seasons)
1967/68 12.Maribor                 30  8 11 11  38-53  27
1968/69 16.Maribor                 34  7 14 13  33-57  28
1969/70 10.Maribor                 34 13  7 14  40-51  33
1970/71 13.Maribor                 34  9 11 14  33-48  29
1971/72 18.Maribor                 34  3 14 17  24-61  20

SŠK Ljubljana (3 top level seasons)
1936/37  8.SŠK Ljubljana           18  6  3  9  21-40  15
1937/38  9.SŠK Ljubljana           18  3  5 10  24-42  11
1938/39  9.SŠK Ljubljana           22  7  4 11  23-41  18

Primorje Ljubljana (2 top level seasons)
1932/33  8.Primorje Ljubljana      20  7  3 10  39-47  17
1934/35  9.Primorje Ljubljana      18  4  5  9  21-43  13

Ilirija Ljubljana (1 top level season)
1927     6.Ilirija Ljubljana        5  1  1  3   5- 9   3

Nafta Lendava (1 top level season)
1946/47 14.Nafta Lendava           26  3  0 23  13-88   6

Cup

1970: finalists: Olimpija Ljubljana      (2-2, 0-1 aet vs Crvena zvezda Beograd)

South Africa

Bophuthatswana | Ciskei | Transkei | Venda

During the late 1970s and early 1980s, the South African apartheid regime declared four (of ten) bantustans (homelands) independent (a move not recognised by any other country, but which caused the inhabitants to lose their South African citizenship). This nominal independence lasted until the first free elections in South Africa, early 1994. The four areas involved were Transkei (capital Umtata, nowadays called Mthatha, nominally independent since 1976), Bophuthatswana (capital Mmabatho, nowadays merged with neighbouring Mafikeng, misspelled by the British as Mafeking, nominally independent since 1977), Venda (capital Thohoyandou, nominally independent since 1979) and Ciskei (capital Bisho, nominally independent since 1981). Together these four are currently known as "TBVC" (after their initial letters). The six other homelands, Gazankulu, KaNgwane, KwaNdebele, KwaZulu, Lebowa and QwaQwa, were never 'granted' this nominal independence.

Bophuthatswana clubs in the South African football structure

Bophuthatswana was the only homeland to set up an independent football structure and to attempt to obtain independent FIFA membership, creating a football assocation (FABO) and league (BOPSOL). The latter, which ran from 1983 to 1996, included GaRankuwa United (played at the second level in South Africa in 2006/07 and 2007/08, when they were relegated back to the third level) and Lehurutshe Birds United (now at the third level). Other BOPSOL clubs were Danville Celtics (from Mafikeng/Mafeking), Itsoseng Sundowns, Lincoln City and Mmabatho Kicks. Unfortunately no details on champions and cup winners within the Bophuthatswana football structure are available, nor is it not known whether any clubs from Bophuthatswana played in the South African football structure during the homeland's nominal independency from 1977 to 1994. Lucas Radebe started his career in the BOPSOL.

Ciskei clubs in the South African football structure

Clubs from Ciskei played in the South African football structure during the homeland's nominal independency from 1981 to 1994.

Transkei clubs in the South African football structure

Umtata Bucks were founded in 1957 by a former official of the Bush Bucks club from Durban who had moved to the area. They played at the South African top level (NSL) for six seasons during Transkei's nominal independency from 1976 to 1994, managing 4 finishes in the top-7, and winning one League Cup, in 1993.
After the end of Transkei's nominal independence, the club were renamed Umtata Bush Bucks and won one more League Cup (in 1996). They remained at the top level (renamed PSL), moving to East London (outside of the former homeland of Transkei) in 2000, until suffering relegation at the end of the 2002/03 season. They returned after only one season, but were relegated again at the end of 2005/06 season and subsequently dissolved, their place at the second level being taken by a new club called Western Province United, based in Cape Town.

Championship (NSL)
1988    17.Umtata Bucks            34  8 10 16  27-48  26
1990     7.Umtata Bucks            34 14  9 11  39-42  37
1991     4.Umtata Bucks            34 17 10  7  51-28  44
1992    17.Umtata Bucks            42 12 14 16  33-42  38
1993     5.Umtata Bucks            38 15 12 11  51-43  42
1994     3.Umtata Bucks            34 18  5 11  51-32  41 

League Cup
1993: winners:   Umtata Bucks            (3-1 vs Cape Town Santos)
Vendan clubs in the South African football structure

Clubs from Venda played in the South African football structure during the homeland's nominal independency from 1979 to 1994. In 1983, Black Leopards were founded in the capital Thohoyandou. They had reached the second South African level by 1996, and won their section (the Northern Stream) in 1996/97, but finished fourth and bottom in the promotion playoff against the three other Stream winners, missing out on one of the two promotion spots. They eventually were promoted to the PSL in 2001 by winning the Inland Stream of the second level (which by then had been reduced to two groups). Black Leopards were part of the PSL until 2008, when they were relegated; in their seven seasons at the top level, they twice finished eighth (2001/02 and 2003/04). They regained top flight status for the 2011/12 season, reaching the cup final against champions Orlando Pirates in the 2010/11 season as well. Their popularity was underlined by the fact that they participated in four consecutive Telkom Charity Cups from 2002 to 2005; this is an invitational 4-team tournament whose participants are decided by popular vote. In their first participation in 2002, they lost the final to Kaizer Chiefs on a penalty shoot-out.

Sudan

Sudan obtained independence in 1956, comprising about two and a half million square kilometres, the geographically largest country in Africa. After more than half a century of conflict and war, interrupted by a decade (1972-1983) of peace, the southernmost part of the country, with about a quarter of its surface, became independent as South Sudan in July 2011. As in the comparable cases of Ethiopia/Eritrea and Tanzania (Mainland)/Zanzibar, we only highlight the performances of the clubs from the 'secessionist' part of the country in the overall structure, because of the (in this case fairly absolute) dominance of the clubs from the 'remaining' entity.

South Sudan clubs in the Sudanese football structure

It is not known whether clubs from South Sudan ever entered the Sudanese top level, though it is not unlikely this happened in the seventies or early eighties, in between the first and second Sudanese civil wars. According to a wikipedia article Juba FC played in the Sudanese championship in the early nineties. In any case, clubs from South Sudan played in second level regional leagues, of which Sudan had and has many, with the regional champions entering promotion playoffs. In 2009, a club from the South Sudanese capital Juba, Al-Malikiya, reached the cup semifinals, only to be defeated 2-13 on aggregate by Al-Merreikh, one of the two Omdurman powerhouses. At the time it was reported that it was "the first time in many years that a team from Juba has reached this level of the competition". No earlier instances are known, but little information on league and cup competitions in Sudan prior to 2000 is available.

Cup

2009: semifinal: Al-Malikiya (Juba)      (2-4, 0-9 vs Al-Merreikh (Omdurman))

Tanzania

Tanganyika gained independence in 1961, Zanzibar in 1963. In 1964 the two joined to form Tanzania. Since at least 1982 (but possibly earlier), the best teams from both regions played for the national championship in the so-called 'Union League' (Ligi Kuu ya Muungano), usually comprising 4 or 6 clubs, half from both areas. This competition was dominated by teams from the 'Mainland' (Tanzania Bara - the term Tanganyika has gotten out of usage), in particular the two giants from the capital Dar es Salaam, Simba and Young Africans (popularly known as Yanga). Only three times (from over 20 tries), a Zanzibar club was crowned champions of the Union League. In 2004, Zanzibar obtained independent membership of CAF, the African football confederation, though FIFA later refused it full membership. The Union League has not been held since 2003, when it wasn't finished due to a legal farce initiated by Yanga. (There was talk to organise one in April 2007, between the top-2 clubs of both CAF members in the 2006 season, but this never happened.) Zanzibar clubs have entered the CAF club competitions independently since 2005, so that we consider its champions since 2004 as 'independent'. Due to the dominance of the Mainland clubs in the overall championship, we do not discuss their performance separately but concentrate on the Zanzibar clubs.

Zanzibar clubs in the Tanzanian football structure

Note that both the championship and cup tournaments tended to be decided in a playoff (Union League (Ligi Kuu ya Muungano) for the championship, Nyerere Cup for the knock-out competition) between a few (2 to 4) teams from both the Mainland and Zanzibar (i.e. Unguja and Pemba), after both areas had held their own independent league and cup competitions.
Due to this (and the fact that complete data are not available), we only list those Zanzibar teams who either won the Union League or Nyerere Cup, and not the league runners-up or losing finalists. Among the successful teams listed below, KMKM won the 'independent' Zanzibar championship 2004 and Polisi the editions of 2005 and 2006, while Miembeni were Zanzibar champions 2007 and 2008.

Championship

1984     1.KMKM                     6  4  0  2   8- 5   8
1989     1.Malindi SC
1992     1.Malindi SC

Cup  

1974: winners:   JKU
1977: winners:   KMKM
1982: winners:   KMKM
1983: winners:   KMKM
1985: winners:   Miembeni SC
1986: winners:   Miembeni SC
1987: winners:   Miembeni SC
1990: winners:   Small Simba SC
1993: winners:   Malindi SC
2001: winners:   Polisi (Zanzibar)       (2-0 vs Young Africans)

NB: JKU denotes Jeshi la Kujenga Uchumi;
    KMKM denotes Kikosi Maalum cha Kuzuia Magendo

Pakistan

Shortly after its independence, the formerly British colony of India was split (in 1948) into India and Pakistan. (Nothing is known about performances by clubs from cities currently in Pakistan or Bangladesh in the Indian national football tournaments of the time.) Pakistan consisted of two regions, separated by India; at the end of 1971, Bangladesh (formerly known as East Pakistan) gained independence. Until the secession of Bangladesh, the capital of East Pakistan, Dacca (currently spelled Dhaka) hosted the national championship of Pakistan 3 times (in 1952, 1957 and 1962), as did the currently Bangladeshi cities of Jessore (1968) and Comilla (1969/70). On 4 occasions the tournament was won by a team from current Bangladesh. As the teams from (West) Pakistan dominated football in the country (in total, 20 championships were contested between 1948 and 1971), no separate mention is made of their successes.
Note that Pakistan bought the harbour city of Gwadar (for 3 million pounds) from the Sultan of Oman in 1958; as no data on Omani football prior to 1972 are available, it is unknown whether any clubs from Gwadar (such as currently existing Gwadar Port Authority) played there.
Pakistan and India have a long standing conflict on the Jammu and Kashmir region - teams from the part currently controlled by Pakistan occasionally enter Pakistani tournaments, but it is not known whether there ever were football competitions covering the entire region.

Bangladeshi clubs in the Pakistani football structure

Championship

1957     2.East Pakistan White
1959     2.East Pakistan
1960     1.East Pakistan
1961/62  1.Dacca  
1962     1.Dacca 
1969/70  1.Chittagong 

Cup  

There was no national cup tournament.

Malaysia

At the beginning of the twentieth century, the current state of Malaysia was a mixture of nominally independent protectorates and colonial states. The Straits Settlements, consisting of Malacca, Dinding, Penang and Singapore (which at the time included Christmas Island and the Cocos Islands) were a British colony, which also included the island of Labuan (off the coast of Borneo, or Kalimantan as it is known in Indonesian) as a separate settlement from 1912 on. The remainder of current Malaysia was divided into the protectorate of the Federated Malay States (Selangor, Perak, Neg(e)ri Sembilan and Pahang) and five other Malay states (also under British protectorate but with slightly more autonomy): Johor(e), Kedah, Kelantan, Perlis and T(e)rengganu. Apart from Singapore and Labuan, all these states formed the Malayan Union in 1946. Note that the two currently Malaysian states on Borneo, Sabah (which included Labuan since the end of World War II) and Sarawak, then together known as British North Borneo, only joined the Federation of Malaya (as the Malayan Union was called since 1948; it had obtained full independence in 1957) in 1963 (as did Singapore); at the occasion, the state was renamed Malaysia. Finally, in 1965, Singapore left the Federation and Malaysia obtained its current shape. Brunei (which lies in between Sarawak (which had belonged to the sultan of Brunei until 1888) and Sabah) never belonged to Malaysia (it was a British protectorate though), but teams from Brunei used to enter the Malaysian football structure as a matter of course, as did those from Singapore until 1995.
Due to the continuity of the participation of the Singapore FA until 1995, its relevant achievements are all included in the section below, whereas the history of Lions XII (since 2012) is included in the corresponding section on roving clubs.

Singapore clubs in the Malaysian football structure

Competitions in Malaysia (both the traditional cup tournament (Malaya Cup, first played 1921 and later (since 1967) renamed Piala Malaysia) and the league, which was not established until 1982) were traditionally played by representations of the regional FAs; in addition several 'service' teams (Tentera, an Army/Navy combination, Combined Services, Prisons) regularly entered. The first club teams (apart from the occasional participation of Malaysia's olympic team) to enter the top division were Johor FC and NS Chempaka, both making their first appearance in 2002. Johor FC had made their debut appearance in the Piala Malaysia in 2000, presumably as the first ever club team to enter the (first round of the) tournament. So, wherever "Singapore" are mentioned below, this refers to the local federation (currently SFA, formerly SAFA) and not a 'proper' club team.
The Singapore FA selection was barred from entering the Malaysian competitions in 1995; in 2012, a Singapore youth selection, called Lions XII, was admitted to the Malaysian Super League (in return, the Malaysian youth team, Harimau Muda, entered the S-League) and finished runners-up as well as reaching the semifinals of the Piala Malaysia. They went one better in 2013 and won the league. See the section on roving clubs.

The Malaya Cup traditionally was organised in a northern section, consisting of Kedah, Penang, Perak and Selangor until World War II, and a southern section, consisting of Johore, Malacca, Negri Sembilan and Singapore until World War II. In addition, British military sides entered, mostly based in Singapore (the only exception being the Burma Rifles, 1935 entrants, who were based in Taiping, Perak). The S.A.F.A. (Singapore Amateur Football Association) side invariably won the southern section of the tournament in the 21 pre-war editions (between 1921 and 1941), never losing a single match (taken all editions together, they played 69 qualifying matches in the southern section, winning 60 and drawing 9 while outscoring their opponents 284 to 58), thus reaching a world record 21 consecutive finals (which may been equalled by FC Vaduz in 2015 and bettered in 2016). Of those 21 pre-war finals, they won 12, lost 7 and drew 2 (in 1928 and 1929, both against Selangor, sharing the cup).
Among the Singapore-based military teams, two deserve a mention as losing Malaya Cup finalists: Army/Navy in 1949 and Armed Forces in 1966 (both known as Tentera in Malaysian sources). Before World War II, a number of Singapore-based military sides finished runners-up in the southern section behind the S.A.F.A. selection: Malaya Command in 1932 (the first year a military side entered the competition) and 1933, Combined Services in the five consecutive editions from 1935 to 1939, Army in 1940 and Royal Air Force in 1941. Malaya Command are also noteworthy for winning the Philippines championship in 1935.

Championship

Singapore FA (2 championships)
1985, 1994
NB: Singapore were barred from entering the Malaysian competitions
    in 1995, after having won the 1994 league-and-cup double; they
    then entered the 1995 Singapore Premier League (as Singapore
    Lions) and won it.

Cup (Malaya Cup/Piala Malaysia)

Singapore FA (24 cups, 2 of these shared)
1921, 1923, 1924, 1925, 1928*, 1929*, 1930, 1932, 1933, 1934, 
1937, 1939, 1940, 1941, 1950, 1951, 1952, 1955, 1960, 1964, 
1965, 1977, 1980, 1994
NB: Singapore shared the 1928 and 1929 cups with Selangor
    after drawing both finals 2-2 aet;
    between 1921 and 1946 Singapore was part of the Straits
    Settlements and thus a British colony; only from 1963 to
    1965 Singapore was a 'normal' member state of independent 
    Malaysia.

Cup (FAM Cup)

Singapore FA (2 cups)
1963, 1967

NB: this secondary cup tournament was the first to be played for
    by club teams, since 1974; from 1952 to 1973 it also was
    reserved for regional FA selections.

Malacca clubs in the Malaysian football structure

Like Singapore and Penang, Malacca was part of the Straits Settlements and thus a British colony before World War II (unlike, nominally, the Federated and Unfederated States of Malaya). Only in 1946 Malacca joined the Malayan Union (later Federation of Malaya and Malaysia) as a 'normal' member state (known as Melaka in Malaysian). The Malacca FA team never reached the Malaya Cup final in the relevant period, never finishing better than runners-up behind Singapore in the southern section of the tournament.

Penang clubs in the Malaysian football structure

Like Singapore and Malacca, Penang was part of the Straits Settlements and thus a British colony before World War II (unlike, nominally, the Federated and Unfederated States of Malaya). Only in 1946 Penang joined the Malayan Union (later Federation of Malaya and Malaysia) as a 'normal' member state (known as Pulau Pinang in Malaysian). The Penang FA team twice won the northern section of the tournament in the relevant period, thus reaching the Malaya Cup final.

Cup (Malaya Cup)

1934: finalists: Penang                  (1-2 vs Singapore)
1941: finalists: Penang                  (1-3 vs Singapore)

Korea

North Korea | South Korea

Unfortunately, few data are available on any common Korean football competition prior to the Korean War in the early 1950s. In addition, information on North Korean football is very sparse. Additional data is very much welcomed.

North Korean clubs in the Korean football structure

The first nationwide tournament on the peninsula was the All Joseon Football Championship, created in 1921, which included up to four different categories ('middle', 'youth', 'elementary' and 'professional'; from 1934 on a 'general' category was introduced, replacing 'youth'), though not all were played for each season. Participants were school sides. Winners from cities currently in North Korea included Pyeongyang Athletic (winners of the 'youth' category in 1922 (the first of the two tournaments held that year)), Pyeongyang Virtue School (winners of the 'elementary' category in the years 1925, 1926 and 1927) and Pyeongyang FC (winners of the 'general' category in 1934). Pyeongyang High School were runners-up in the 'middle' category 1924. The tournament was discontinued after 1940.
A number of North Korean champions since 1985 are known (with April 25 and Locomotive (also known as Kigwancha) winning most championships), but none prior to that period. It is unknown whether any North Korean teams entered the Amateur Adult Football Conference, started in 1946 and dominated by army units, a number of universities and a few company and factory teams. See the section on South Korean clubs for more information on the finalists of this competition prior to 1950.

South Korean clubs in the Korean football structure

South Korea formed a professional league in 1983. Prior to that, the main nationwide football competition was the Amateur Adult Football Conference (AAFC), started in 1946 and dominated by army units, a number of universities and a few company and factory teams. (See also the remarks on the All Joseon Football Championship for school teams in the section on North Korea above.) It is unclear whether the early editions just after World War II also had participants from the current North Korea; among the AAFC finalists prior to to 1950, Songkyunkwan University (runners-up in 1947 and 1948) won the same tournament in 1987, and Yonhee University (winners in 1948 and runners-up in 1949) won it as Yonsei University (following a 1957 merger between two academic institutions) in 1984 and finished runners-up in 1974 and 1987. Jo-il Brewery (winners in 1946 and 1947) and Joseon Dockyard (winners in 1949) reached the final of the South Korean Presidents Cup after the war (Joseon Dockyard finishing runners-up in 1952, 1953 and 1954, Jo-il Brewery (from Incheon) winning in 1954). In this competition, also Songkyunkwan University (runners-up 1974 and 1985) and Yonsei University (winners 1980 and 1989 and runners-up 1969 and 1997) reached the final. Only College of Commerce, runners-up in 1946, did not reach the final of either competition since the Korean War.

Vietnam

North Vietnam | South Vietnam

Information about football in both North Vietnam and South Vietnam prior to their unification is very incomplete. The first common competition was not held until 1980, a few years after political unification. Below, all known data on championship winning sides in both North and South Vietnam are listed, together with the successes (if any) of the relevant clubs since unification. Additional data is very much welcomed.

North Vietnamese clubs in the Vietnamese football structure

Cau Lac Bo Quan Doi (Ha Noi) [also known as Army Sports Club]
  won 10 championships in North Vietnam, their last in 1978;
  won 5 championships in Vietnam, in 
  1981/82, 1982/83, 1987, 1990, and 1998,
  the last under their new name The Cong;
  reached and lost two cup finals in Vietnam, in
  1992 and 2004 (the last as The Cong)

Quan Khu Thu Do  
  won the last ever championship in North Vietnam 1979;
  were runners-up in Vietnam 1981/82
South Vietnamese clubs in the Vietnamese football structure

Hai Quan (Saigon) [also known as Customs]
  won the 1966 championship in South Vietnam;
  won 1 championship in Vietnam, in 1991;
  won 2 cups in Vietnam, in 1996 and 1997;
  lost the 1998 cup final

Cong An (Saigon) [also known as Police]
  won the 1967 championship in South Vietnam;
  won 1 championship in Vietnam, in 1995;
  won 2 cups in Vietnam, in 1998 and 2001;
  lost the 2000 cup final

Cang Sai Gon (Saigon) [also known as Port Saigon]
  won the 1977 championship in South Vietnam;
  won 4 championships in Vietnam, in 1984, 1993/94, 1997, and 2001/02;
  won 2 cups in Vietnam, in 1992 and 2000;
  lost the Vietnam cup finals in 1994, 1996 and 1997

Quan Doi (Army)
  won championships in South Vietnam (years unknown);
  did not win honours in Vietnam

Quan Thue (Airport Customs)  
  won championships in South Vietnam (years unknown);
  did not win honours in Vietnam

Yemen

North Yemen | South Yemen

In 1990, North Yemen (official name since 1962: the Yemen Arab Republic), which had been part of the Ottoman Empire until 1918, and South Yemen (official name since 1970: People's Democratic Republic of Yemen), which had been under British rule until 1967, unified. Below, clubs from both regions which have won all-Yemen honours since 1990 are listed (and additional data are given where known). Note that the city of Aden was governed as part of British India until 1937 before obtaining a separate status as the 'Colony of Aden'; the hinterland of the city was known as 'Aden Protectorate'. In 1962 a British-controlled 'Federation of South Arabia' (including Aden) was formed, with several Emirates refusing to join this federation uniting in the 'Protectorate of South Arabia'. In 1967, South Yemen became independent, with Aden as capital.

North Yemenite clubs in the Yemenite football structure

The main cities in former North Yemen are Sanaa, Taizz, Hudaida and Ibb. Clubs from Sanaa (the capital of unified Yemen) have dominated the league championship, but clubs from the other towns have won occasional honours as well. Among the various cup tournaments, we only consider the President Cup, the main competition, held since 1995.

Al-Ahli (Sanaa)
  won 6 championships in Yemen, in
  1991/92, 1993/94, 1998/99, 1999/00, 2000/01 and 2007;
  won at least 4 championships in North Yemen, in
  1980/81, 1982/83, 1983/84 and 1987/88;
  won 3 President Cups in Yemen, in 2001, 2003/04 and 2009;
  won at least 4 cups in North Yemen, in 
  1979/80, 1981/82, 1982/83, 1983/84

Al-Wahda (Sanaa)
  won 4 championships in Yemen, in
  1994/95, 1996/97, 1997/98 and 2002;
  won at least 1 championship in North Yemen, in 1978/79:
  won at least 1 cup in North Yemen, in 1977/78

Al-Sha'ab (Ibb)
  won 3 championships in Yemen, in 2002/03, 2003/04 and 2011/12;
  won 2 President Cups in Yemen, in 2001/02 and 2002/03;
  it is unknown whether they won any honours in North Yemen

Al-Saqr (Taizz)
  won 3 championships in Yemen, in 2006, 2009/10 and 2013/14;
  it is unknown whether they won any honours in North Yemen

Al-Hilal (Hudaida)  
  won 2 championships in Yemen, in 2007/08 and 2008/09;
  won 2 President Cups in Yemen, in 2005 and 2008;
  it is unknown whether they won any honours in North Yemen

Al-Yarmouk (Sanaa)
  won 1 championship in Yemen, in 2013;
  won at least 2 championships in North Yemen, in 1988/89 and 1989/90

Al-Ahli (Hudaida)  
  won 1 President Cup in Yemen, in 1995/96;
  it is unknown whether they won any honours in North Yemen

Al-Ittihad (Ibb)
  won 1 President Cup in Yemen, in 1998;
  it is unknown whether they won any honours in North Yemen

Al-Ahli (Taizz)  
  won 1 President Cup in Yemen, in 2012;
  it is unknown whether they won any honours in North Yemen

Al-Shorta (Sanaa)
  won at least 1 championship in North Yemen, in 1985/86;
  did not win honours in Yemen

Al-Sha'ab (Sanaa)
  won at least 1 championship (1981/82) in North Yemen;
  won at least 1 cup (1980/81) in North Yemen;
  did not win honours in Yemen

Al-Zuhra (Sanaa)
  won at least 1 championship (1979/80) in North Yemen;
  won at least 1 cup (1978/79) in North Yemen;
  did not win honours in Yemen
South Yemenite clubs in the Yemenite football structure

The main cities in former South Yemen are Aden and Mukalla; clubs from both towns have won occasional honours. Among the various cup tournaments, we only consider the President's Cup, the main competition, held since 1995. Nothing is known about separate competitions in Aden during the period it was part of British India (until 1937) or its separate colonial status (from 1937 to 1962); however, local side Al-Tilal was founded in 1905 and may therefore have played in such competitions.

Al-Tilal (Aden)
  won at least 6 championships in South Yemen, in 
  1970/71, 1976/77, 1979/80, 1981/82, 1982/83 and 1986/87;
  won 2 championships in Yemen, in 1990/91 and 2005;
  won 2 President Cups in Yemen, in 2007 and 2010;

Al-Wahda (Aden) 
  won at least 3 championships in South Yemen, in 1975/76, 1987/88 and 1988/89;
  won at least 1 cup (1983/84) in South Yemen;
  did not win honours in Yemen

Al-Sha'ab Hadramaut (Mukalla)
  won 2 President Cups in Yemen, in 2000 and 2006;
  it is unknown whether they won any honours in South Yemen

Al-Shorta (Aden)
  won at least 1 championship (1983/84) in South Yemen;
  did not win honours in Yemen

Al-Shula (Aden)
  won at least 1 championship (1989/90) in South Yemen;
  did not win honours in Yemen

United Arab Republic

Egyptian clubs in the Syrian football structure

Between 1958 and 1961, Egypt and Syria formed the "United Arab Republic" (which also included the former North Yemen). During this period, one championship was contested, in the spring of 1961, between the cup finalists of both Egypt and Syria. Al-Ahly from Cairo defeated their namesakes from Damascus 4-1 in the final, and are sometimes considered the first ever Syrian cup winners.

British Palestine

Israel | Jordan | Palestine

The territory now divided among Israel, the West Bank, the Gaza Strip and Jordan was captured by the United Kingdom from the Ottoman Empire in World War I. In 1923, the area became known as the Mandate of Palestine, after the League of Nations mandated the UK to control the territory. In 1946, the part east of Jordan river became the Kingdom of Transjordan (nowadays commonly known as Jordan).
The remaining part of the former British Mandate of Palestine, to which we will refer to as "British Palestine" below, was partitioned in May 1948 into a Jewish State (hereafter referred to as Israel), an Arab State and Jerusalem, an enclave to be administered internationally, following a vote in the General Assembly of the United Nations in November 1947.
A war between Arab countries (Lebanon, Syria, Jordan, Egypt and Iraq) and Israel followed, which resulted in Egypt taking the Gaza Strip, Jordan the West Bank, and a mass exodus of Palestinians fleeing from the area now known as Israel. Jordan annexed the West Bank in 1950, but lost the territory to Israel in the 1967 Six-Day War (after which Israel also occupied the Gaza Strip).
In 1993, an autonomous "Palestinian Authority" was established, which currently governs the Gaza Strip as well as the part of the West Bank not colonised by Israeli settlers; East Jerusalem, which was annexed by Israel rather than occupied, also does not belong to the area governed by the Palestinian Authority.

Below, the 1948/49 partition following the Arab-Israeli war (or Al-Nakba, the Catastrophe, as it is known to the Palestinians) is taken to define the borders between "Israel" and "Palestine" (so the latter consists of the West Bank including East Jerusalem as well as the Gaza Strip), in spite of the fact that any future Palestinian state (if the USA will ever force Israel to allow one) is unlikely to consist of this territory, given the ongoing Jewish colonisation of the West Bank, in particular the area surrounding East Jerusalem as well as the Jordan valley, and the construction (on occupied territory) of a 'protection' wall, both apparently aimed at splitting the 'Palestine' area into a number of bantustans. (For instance, the wall divides the Arab East Jerusalem district Jabal Mukabar, whose football team won the 2009/10 Palestinian West Bank Division A, into two parts.)

Using the above definitions for British Palestine, Israel and Palestine, we distinguish three periods since the first World War: the British Mandate (British Palestine) encompassing both current Israel and the currently occupied territories (Palestine) until 1948 (as well as Jordan until 1947); the Jordan occupation (and subsequent annexation) of the West Bank and the Egyptian occupation of the Gaza Strip between 1948 and 1967; and the Israeli occupation of both areas since 1967. So, there are sections on: Israeli clubs in British Palestine until 1948, Jordan clubs in British Palestine until 1947, Palestinian clubs in British Palestine until 1948, Palestinian clubs in Jordan 1948-1967, Palestinian clubs in Egypt 1948-1967, and Palestinian clubs in Israel since 1967.

Israeli clubs in the British Palestinian football structure

Note that the usage of "Israeli" in the section heading is anachronistic; it is meant to refer to the current territory of the state Israel; contemporary usage would have been "Hebrew" or "Jewish".

The Palestine FA (which later turned into the current Israeli FA) was established in 1928 and obtained FIFA membership in 1929. In spite of the fact that Arabs formed about three quarters of the population of British Palestine at the time, they had no real influence in the PFA. Of the 15 people on the initial PFA Board, only 1 was Arab (representing Jerusalem club Nadi Islami Al-Riyadhi, the Islamic Sports Club), and he only attended the first meeting of the board. Since then, no Arab ever participated in a PFA board meeting. (A similar situation occurred in the Palestine Olympic Committee formed in 1933.) The league organised by the PFA consisted of 69 teams divided over 3 divisions, of which 11 were Arab, none in the 10-team first division (5 in the 20-team second division and 6 at the third level). The British Palestine team participating in the 1934 World Cup qualifiers (which lost to Egypt) did not contain any Arab players; likewise the team entering the 1938 World Cup qualifiers (and losing to Greece) was exclusively Jewish, it being boycotted by Arab Palestinians (both muslim and christian) and other ethnic groups. In 1931 a rival organisation was formed by Arabs, but it failed to obtain membership of FIFA.

As Jewish clubs dominated football in British Palestine, we only list the honours won by the relevant clubs (as in comparable cases in other parts of the world). All 9 championships between 1932 and 1947 in British Palestine were won by currently Jewish clubs, with the exception of the 1932 championship, which went to the British Police club. Likewise, 14 of the 15 cup tournaments (as currently recognised by the Israeli FA; there also were 6 tournaments from 1922 to 1927, all won by British clubs, and 2 war cups in 1943 and 1944/45, the first of which also won by a British club) were won by Jewish clubs, with the only exception again being the British Police in 1932, who were leading the final 1-0 when opponents Hapoel Haifa walked off; in addition, the 1930 losing finalists were the British Army 48th Troop. The (inaugural) 1928 cup, in which one Arab club (Carmel Haifa), one British team from the Gaza Strip and another British team from Amman (now in Jordan) entered, was shared as winners Hapoel Tel-Aviv had fielded an ineligible player.
Since 1948, Maccabi Tel-Aviv have won 14 more Israeli league championships and 16 cups; Hapoel Tel-Aviv won 7 more league titles and 7 cups; Maccabi Petah-Tikva won the 1952 cup but no further honours; and Beitar Tel-Aviv and Maccabi Hashmonai Jerusalem won no more honours (but Beitar Tel-Aviv reached and lost the 1977 cup final).

Championship

Maccabi Tel-Aviv (4 championships)
1936, 1937, 1941, 1947

Hapoel Tel-Aviv (4 championships)
1934, 1935, 1940, 1943

NB: only regional championships were played in 1938 and 1939;
    the Tel-Aviv league was won by Hapoel Tel-Aviv in the fall
    seasons of 1938 and 1939, and by Maccabi Tel-Aviv in the
    spring season of 1939, but these titles were deemed unofficial
    after research in 2002 (which also discovered that Maccabi
    rather than Hapoel won the 1936 league).

Cup

Maccabi Tel-Aviv (6 cups)
1929, 1930, 1933, 1941, 1946, 1947

Hapoel Tel-Aviv (5 cups, of which 1 shared)
1928 (shared), 1934, 1937, 1938, 1939

Beitar Tel-Aviv (2 cups)
1940, 1942

Maccabi Petah-Tikva (1 cup)
1935

Maccabi Hashmonai Jerusalem (1 cup, shared)
1928 (shared; they lost the final 0-2 to Hapoel Tel-Aviv who
      had fielded an ineligible player)
Jordan clubs in the British Palestinian football structure

The first official cup tournament organised by the PFA in 1928 included Flying Amman, apparently a British air force team based in the current capital of Jordan.

Palestinian clubs in the British Palestinian football structure

The first official cup tournament organised by the PFA in 1928 included Flying Gaza, apparently a British air force team based in Gaza. The team reached the semifinals, in which they lost 0-1 to Hapoel Tel-Aviv.

Next to no information is available on the performances of the Arab clubs playing in the PFA league structure, and no information is available on clubs from the Gaza Strip and the West Bank to play in the PFA league; the rival Arab league discussed below had some member teams from the current Gaza Strip and West Bank but nothing is known about their performances (the relevant archives were lost during the 1948 Nakba).

Nadi Islami Al-Riyadhi from Jerusalem were represented in the initial PFA board so presumably entered in the early 1930s. According to a Palestinian source, at least three Arab clubs, Nadi Al-Rawtha and Shabab Al-Arab from Jerusalem and Shabab Al-Arab from Haifa, joined the PFA (directly?) after the 1936 dissolution of the APSF (see below), with Shabab Al-Arab from Jerusalem playing in the first division for (at least) one season (as the only Arab club to ever do so prior to the 1948 Nakba), but this is apparently incorrect. Israeli sources do not mention either of the two aforementioned Jerusalem clubs and Shabab Al-Arab from Haifa never played in the top division; they list the following Arab clubs in the PFA league structure between 1936 and 1948, all playing in the 1942 season only which was organised in three regional leagues: Nadi Islami Haifa, Shabab Al-Arab Haifa, and National Sport Club Jaffa; in addition an Armenian club, Homenetmen (Jerusalem) played from 1940 to 1942 (and won the Jerusalem regional league in 1942 but refused to play Tel-Aviv champions Maccabi Tel-Aviv for the championship).

As Arabs had next to no influence within the PFA, they founded a rival organisation, the Arab Palestinian Sports Federation (APSF), in 1931. This organised a league (about which nothing is known) until 1936, the year of the revolt against British rule. A league resumed in 1944, consisting of 6 regions with 45 clubs, from Al-Quds (Jerusalem) and Jafa (Jaffa) to Al-Khalil (Hebron). The regional champions qualified for the final round of the Palestine Championship. The first winners, in 1945, were Nadi Islami Jafa (from Jaffa), beating Al-Orthodox from Jerusalem in the final; the 1946 and 1947 titles both went to Shabab Al-Arab from Haifa. No further data are known, apart from a number of participating clubs (including the three mentioned): in Al-Quds (Jerusalem): Nadi Al-Ahly (National), Al-Dajani Club, Al-Orthodox and Jamia Al-Shaban Al-Masihe (Young Men's Christian Association, YMCA); in Jafa (Jaffa): Nadi Islami Jafa (Jafa Islamic Club) and Al-Orthodox; and in Haifa: Nadi Islami Haifa (Haifa Islamic Club), Nadi Shabab Al-Arab (Arab Youth Club), Nadi Al-Tersana (Arsenal) and Homenetmen (an Armenian club). Teams were also formed in other cities, such as Gaza (Nadi Gaza Al-Riyadhi (founded 1934), Al-Arabi (founded 1938) and Al-Orthodox (founded 1944)) and Al-Nasreh (Nadi Al-Nahda (Renaissance Club)). Other member clubs existed in Nablus, Tulkarm (both on the West Bank (as per current usage; pre-1948 'West Bank' denoted the entire area between Mediterranean and Jordan river)), Akko (Acre) and Beir Al-Saba (Beersheba).

Comoros

Mayotte

The Comoros archipelago consists of four main islands: Ngazidja (known as Grande Comore in French), Nzwani (Anjouan in French), Mwali (Mohéli in French) and Mahoré (Mayotte in French). It was a French colony until 1975, when three of the four declared their independence as the Udzima wa komori (Union des Comores); the fourth island, Mayotte, opted to remain part of the French state as an overseas department. Prior to this split, various domestic tournaments were organised on the Comoros involving clubs or representations from Mayotte.

Mayotte clubs in the Comoros football structure

Between 1970 and 1973 a tournament between the champions of the various islands was organised by the sports ministry of the Comoros. No results or winners are known, but participants from Mayotte in this tournament included Rafale and Soleil de Labattoir.

Netherlands Antilles

Aruba | Bonaire

The Dutch colony in the Caribbean, the Netherlands Antilles, consisted of six islands, three near the coast of Venezuela, the Benedenwindse Eilanden (Leeward Islands) of Aruba, Bonaire and Curaçao, and three near the Atlantic Ocean, the Bovenwindse Eilanden (Windward Islands) of Saba, Sint Eustatius and Sint Maarten (the latter island 'shared' with France). The clubs from the Bovenwindse Eilanden never participated in the overall championship playoffs, but the three Benedenwindse Eilanden organised the Kopa Antiano. The first edition was played in 1960 between the champions and runners-up of both Curaçao and Aruba, and the champions of Bonaire joined from 1972 onwards; Aruban clubs ceased to enter when the island of Aruba obtained a status aparte in 1986 (it now also has separate membership of CONCACAF and FIFA). Afterwards, the tournament was played between clubs from Bonaire and Curaçao only. The Kopa Antiano has been dominated by clubs from Curaçao, the largest island in both surface area and population, but two Aruban clubs have won the title. As the colony was reorganised in 2010, with Curaçao and Sint Maarten obtaining a similar status aparte as Aruba and the other three islands obtaining a municipal status (becoming an 'ordinary' Dutch gemeente), implying the end of the Kopa Antiano, we also list the best performances of Bonaire clubs in the tournament. None of them ever won the championship, but two clubs finished runners-up on (in total) eight occasions.

Aruban clubs in the Netherlands Antillian football structure

Clubs from Aruba entered the Kopa Antiano up to and including the 1985 edition, winning on two occasions and finishing runners-up on eight (including the 1942 edition organised by the N.A.V.B., a shortlived (1941-1946) predecessor of the N.A.V.U. founded in 1958). All three clubs mentioned below have won titles on Aruba since the introduction of the status aparte in 1986: Estrella eight (1988, 1989, 1990, 1992, 1996, 1998, 1999 and 2006), R.C.A. (Racing Club Aruba) eight as well (1986, 1987, 1991, 1994, 2002, 2008, 2011 and 2012) and Dakota one (1995). Those three clubs also won all titles on Aruba between 1960 and 1985, with the exception of 1975 (champions Bubali) and 1984 (champions San Luis Deportivo).
Note that Estrella were runners-up in Aruba (behind Dakota) when they won the Kopa Antiano in 1970 (after a play-off against Dakota); other Aruban runners-up which entered the Antillian playoffs in the past are (apart from Estrella, R.C.A., Dakota, Bubali and San Luis Deportivo who all entered as champions as well) S.C.A. and Tropical. None of these clubs (apart from Estrella, R.C.A. and Dakota as mentioned) won Aruban championships since 1986.

An attempt to revive the three-way tournament was made with the ABC Cup, held on Aruba on two occasions between the champions of the three islands and the runners-up of hosts Aruba, in November 1992 (winners Sithoc from Curaçao) and in November 1993 (winners Riverplate from Aruba).
In February 2002 and March 2003 a friendly tournament, the Copa Amistad, was contested on Aruba between the top two teams from Aruba and Curaçao (Bonaire teams did not enter); R.C.A. won this tournament in 2002.

Kopa Antiano

1942: runners-up:R.C.A. (Oranjestad)
1961: runners-up:R.C.A. (Oranjestad)
1962: runners-up:Dakota (Oranjestad)
1965: winners:   R.C.A. (Oranjestad)
1968: runners-up:Estrella (Santa Cruz)
1969: runners-up:Estrella (Santa Cruz)
1970: winners:   Estrella (Santa Cruz)
1970: runners-up:Dakota (Oranjestad)
1977: runners-up:R.C.A. (Oranjestad)
1983: runners-up:Dakota (Oranjestad)
Bonaire clubs in the Netherlands Antillian football structure

No Bonaire club won the championship, but two clubs finished runners-up on (in total) eight occasions. In addition, Juventus were on course to win the 1976/77 edition (they had secured a championship playoff against Jong Colombia) before being excluded following a controversy over an allegedly improperly registered player.

Kopa Antiano

1974: runners-up:Real Rincon 
1985: finalists: Juventus                (1-2, 2-3 vs Undeba)
1988: finalists: Juventus                (2-4, 2-3 vs Jong Colombia)
1992: finalists: Juventus                (1-1, 1-2 aet vs Sithoc)
1996: finalists: Real Rincon             (1-1, 0-2 vs Undeba)
2000: finalists: Juventus                (0-3 vs Jong Colombia)
2008: finalists: Juventus                (0-1 vs Centro Barber)
2010: finalists: Real Rincon             (0-2 vs Centro Barber)

NB: the 1996 Kopa Antiano playoff was played early 1997, the 2000
    edition in April 2001; the 2010 edition was the last.

Additional remarks on Africa

French Northern Africa | French Western Africa | French Equatorial Africa | Italian East Africa | North and South Rhodesia | Stanley Pool

During the colonial era, various currently independent regions shared a 'domestic' football competition. Above, a few examples are given (and discussed in more detail below), with no pretence of completeness.
For instance, the current states of Burundi and Rwanda were 'united' as a Belgian mandate area ('Ruanda-Urundi') between 1946 and 1962. However, it is unknown whether any organised football was played in the area prior to the independence of both countries in 1962. Two clubs from Urundi (Wairless d'Usumbara, from current Bujumbura, and Sporting Maniema) reportedly entered the championship of the Belgian Congo in 1959 which appears to have been abandoned or cancelled.
During the civil war in former Zaire, in 2001, a team representing the Rwandan Army entered a regional championship in the city of Kongolo, in Eastern Katanga. This team presumably was not identical to Rwandan top club and army side APR.
Likewise, after the collapse of the Somalian state in 1991, its northern region (Somaliland) became de facto independent and now organises its own football competitions in the area; previously clubs from the area (which was a British colony until World War II, while the remainder of Somalia was Italian; the two only united in 1960) presumably entered the Somalian football structure but no data are available on that.
Between 1967 and 1970, part of Nigeria seceded as Biafra, a move recognised by parts of the so-called 'international community' (in particular, the states of Gabon, Haiti, Ivory Coast, Tanzania and Zambia). Whether any football was played in the region during those 3 years is not known. Many of the strongest football teams in Nigeria are from cities in this region, such as its capital Enugu (Enugu Rangers, Nigerian champions on 5 occasions, also cup winners 5 times, 1977 winners of the African Cup Winners Cup, and losing finalists in the 1975 African Champions Cup; this club was founded in 1970, after the Biafran War, and were flag bearers of the Biafran Freedom Fighters), Aba (Enyimba, 6 championships, 3 cups, and 2 wins in the African Champions League), Calabar (Calabar Rovers, 1 cup win), Onitsha (Jasper United, without domestic honours), Owerri (Iwuanyanwu Nationale, 5 championships, 1 cup, and losing finalists in the African Champions Cup in 1988 against ES Sétif, then in the second Algerian division), Port Harcourt (Dolphin, formerly Eagle Cement, 2 championships, 3 cups, and losing finalists of the 2005 CAF Confederation Cup; now defunct Port Harcourt FC, 3 cups; and Sharks, without domestic honours) and Yenagoa (Bayelsa United, 1 championship).
The currently western provinces of Cameroon, including cities such as Bamenda, Buéa, Kumba, Kumbo, Limbe (founded as Victoria) and Tiko, were part of British Cameroon between 1919 and 1961, which belonged to Nigeria. Nothing is known about the participation of clubs from the region in the Nigerian football structure. In Cameroon, P&T Social Club from Buéa lost the cup final in 1964; PWD Bamenda reached and lost two cup finals (1967 and 1979) while Mount Cameroon from Buéa won the 2002 edition (2-1 against Sable de Batié). Various clubs from the region, including PWD Bamenda, Mount Cameroon, Kumbo Strikers, Tiko United, and Victoria United from Limbe, played one or more seasons in the Cameroon top division. Tiko United won the 2008/09 championship of Cameroon.

French Northern Africa

French Northern Africa consisted (roughly) of the area of the current states Morocco, Algeria and Tunisia. During colonial times, this area was divided into 5 regions, Alger, Constantine, Maroc, Oran and Tunis. These 5 areas had regional football championships and cup tournaments, with the best teams entering an overall competition; for further details see the sections on the North African Champions Cup and the North African Cup. Also note the section on clubs from Algeria, Morocco and Tunisia playing in the French cup.

French Western Africa

French Western Africa consisted (roughly) of the area of the current states Benin (then Dahomey), Burkina Faso (then Haute-Volta), Guinea (Guinée), Ivory Coast (Côte d'Ivoire), Mali (then Soudan), Mauritania (Mauritanie), Niger and Senegal (Sénégal). These areas had regional football championships and cup tournaments, with the best teams entering an overall competition created in 1947; teams from Mauritania did not enter, but teams from Togo (although official not part of French Western Africa) entered the later editions; for further details see the section on the Coupe d'Afrique Occidentale Française.

French Equatorial Africa

French Equatorial Africa consisted (roughly) of the area of the current states Congo(-Brazzaville) (then Moyen-Congo), Central Africa (then Oubangui-Chari), Chad (Tchad) and Gabon. These areas had regional football championships and cup tournaments; in 1958/59 a competition was organised for their champions; for further details see the section on the Coupe d'Afrique Equatoriale Française.

Italian East Africa

Italian East Africa (Africa Orientale Italiana) combined the current states of Eritrea, Ethiopia and Somalia between 1936 and 1941. An Italian wikipedia page claims that Addis Abeba club Saint George were champions of this entity in 1938 and 1939, finished 5th in the 1937 championship and 6th in 1940, and additionally won the cup in 1938. On the other hand, according to another Italian wikipedia page, only provincial championships were held during the period in question (with Ethiopia itself being separated in five such provinces, one of them being Eritrea).

North and South Rhodesia, Nyasaland

Between 1962 and 1965, the winners of the Castle Cups in North Rhodesia (now Zambia) and South Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe) played off for the Inter-Rhodesia Castle Cup. Note that between 1953 and 1963, these two regions formed the Central African Federation together with Nyasaland (the modern state of Malawi).

In 1961, a professional league comprising clubs from all three regions (among which Nyasa United from Blantyre (now in Malawi), City of Lusaka from current Zambia and Salisbury United from current Harare, Zimbabwe), was organised, but it was aborted after a few matches.

In addition, it should be noted that Rhodesia entered the South African Currie Cup for provincial selections on various occasions since 1908, winning it in 1959. The team presumably was dominated by players from Salisbury (now Harare) and Bulawayo, both in Southern Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe).

Stanley Pool

The cities of Brazzaville (in the Republic of Congo, formerly a French colony and often referred to as Congo-Brazzaville in this archive) and Léopoldville (currently called Kinshasa and the capital of the Democratic Republic of Congo, formerly a Belgian colony and often referred to as Congo-Kinshasa in this archive) are on opposite sides of a lake in the Congo River, called Stanley Pool in colonial times (its current name is Malebo Pool). The clubs of these two capital cities formed the Fédération de Football Association du Pool, which organised common championships and cup tournaments during the colonial era. For further details see the sections on the Stanley Pool Championship and the Stanley Pool Cup.


Moving Countries

Austria | Poland | Germany | Finland | Hungary | Armenia | Yugoslavia | Italy | Netherlands

Austria

The Austrian part of the Habsburg Empire contained regions now in the Czech Republic (Bohemia and Moravia), Poland (Galicia), Ukraine (Galicia and Bukovina) and Romania (Bukovina).

The Österreichische Fußball-Verband (founded in 1904 as successor of the Österreichische Fußball-Union) awarded first class status to a number of clubs from Bohemia (mostly from Prague, one from Teplice/Teplitz) and one from current Poland (Cracow). This had mostly prestige value as no organised top level league competition existed outside of Vienna (and even there only intermittently: the Tagblatt-Pokal from 1900 to 1903 and the official league from 1911 onwards). A number of Czech clubs entered the Challenge Cup, held from 1897 to 1911, a competition open to all clubs from the Habsburg Empire but with origin and centre in Vienna.

Czech Republic | Italy | Poland | Slovenia | Ukraine

Czech clubs in the Austrian football structure

The following Czech clubs enjoyed first class status as granted by the Österreichische Fußball-Verband: Deutscher FC Prag (since 1904; see also their earlier adventure in Germany), Sparta Praha (1904-1906), Slavia Praha (1905-1906) and Teplitzer FK (since 1909). Note that Sparta and Slavia joined the Ceský Svaz Fotballový (CSF) in 1906.

In 1914, a number of Bohemian clubs joined the rebel federation FUAN (Football Union of Austrian Nations) set up by Vienna after their relegation from the top flight. However, none of them entered the FUAN league in its inaugural season, 1915.

Note that during World War II some Czech clubs entered the Austrian league structure, which itself was part of the German league structure at the time. See the section on Czech clubs in the German football structure.

City name correspondences: 
German           Czech
Prag             Praha
Teplitz          Teplice

Challenge Cup

1901: finalists: SK Slavia Praha         (0-1 vs Wiener AC)
1901: semifinal: ČAFC Vinohrady          (1-13 vs SK Slavia Praha)
1902: semifinal: SK Slavia Praha         (3-4 aet vs Vienna Cricket FC)
1903: finalists: ČAFC Vinohrady          (scratched vs Wiener AC)

Italian clubs in the Austrian football structure

Part of northern Italy belonged to the Habsburg Empire until after the end of World War I, in particular Südtirol and the Trentino, of which the first was mostly German speaking and the second predominantly Italian speaking.

The first football club in Südtirol was FC Rapid Bozen, founded in 1907 (and merged into FC Bozen in 1962), who were followed by the FK Meran in 1910, founded out of the football section (formed 1901) of the local Turnverein, which had been founded in 1886. They were renamed Sportclub Meran in 1912 and took the colours (white-black) from the Wiener Sportclub.
As there was no Tyrolian championship at the time, the Meran club only played friendly matches, mostly against teams from Bavaria and (northern) Tyrolia. Because of its success in these matches, SC Meran applied to be recognised as Tiroler Meister, but this was rejected by the Deutsch-Alpenländische Fußballverband. In 1920, the clubs in southern Tyrolia founded the Deutsch-Südtiroler Fußballverband, which organised regional competitions involving clubs from Bozen, Meran, Bruneck and Sterzing. In October 1920, Italy annexed southern Tyrolia and contacts with the north were stopped. The (german speaking) clubs from the region were Italianised or forbidden under the fascist regime; SC Meran were dissolved in 1928 before being refounded in December 1945.

In Trento, football first started being played at the sport clubs Unione Ginnastica and Polisportiva Sport Pedestre in the beginning of the twentieth century, but there appears to have been no notable activity outside of the region.

Note that also Trieste belonged to the Habsburg Empire until 1918, but local sides such as Ponziana only played at local level.

City name correspondences: 
German           Italian          Slovenian        Croatian
Bozen            Bolzano
Bruneck          Brunico
Meran            Merano
Sterzing         Vipiteno
Trient           Trento
Triest           Trieste          Trst             Trst

Polish clubs in the Austrian football structure

In the region of Galicia, nowadays divided between Poland and the Ukraine, a football organisation, the Galician Football Union, was founded on June 25, 1911, and became an autonomous member of the Austrian football federation on September 3, 1911.

In the same year, Cracovia from Kraków obtained first class status from the Österreichische Fußball-Verband.

In 1913, a first Galician championship authorised by the Austrian football federation was organised with four clubs, 2 from Kraków and 2 from Lwów; the two Kraków clubs finished first and second.

City name correspondences: 
German           Polish           Ukrainian
Krakau           Kraków           Krakiv

Galician Championship

1913     1.Cracovia Kraków
1913     2.Wisla Kraków

Slovenian clubs in the Austrian football structure

In the 1912/13 season, a club from Cilli (now Celje) entered the first ever league organised by the Deutsch-Alpenländischer Fußballverband, which comprised of 4 clubs from Graz and the Deutscher Athletik-Sportklub (known as DAC) from Cilli, which finished fifth and last with 1 win from 8 matches. It is not known whether the club also entered in 1913/14. Clubs from Cilli and Marburg also entered the Grazer Herbstmesse-Pokal in 1911 and 1913, a Styrian knock-out tournament played between 1906 and 1925 which also saw clubs from other Austrian regions (Wien, Niederösterreich and Kärnten) enter occasionally. In 1911, DAC (founded as Deutscher Athletiksportklub Eiche in 1906 and renamed Deutscher Athletik-Sportklub two years later) reached the final of the competition, in which they lost 0-5 to Grazer AK.

Note that three clubs from Maribor (then Marburg) and Trbovlje (then Trifail) played in the southern group of the Gauliga Steiermark in the 1943/44 season, when the Austrian league structure itself was part of the German league structure; in addition, clubs from Aßling, Krainburg, Veldes and Cilli entered the Carinthian league structure during one or more war seasons; see the section on Slovenian clubs in the German football structure.

City name correspondences: 
German           Slovenian
Aßling           Jesenice
Cilli            Celje
Krainburg        Kranj
Marburg          Maribor
Trifail          Trbovlje
Veldes           Bled

Ukrainian clubs in the Austrian football structure

In the region of Galicia, nowadays divided between Poland and the Ukraine, a football organisation, the Galician Football Union, was founded on June 25, 1911, and became an autonomous member of the Austrian football federation on September 3, 1911. In 1913, the club ST Ukraine from Lwów (ST = Sportivne Tovaristvo or sports comrades) joined the Austrian football federation; in the same year a first Galician championship authorised by the Austrian football federation was organised with four clubs, 2 from Kraków and 2 from Lwów. A championship of the Bukovina (nowadays divided between Romania and the Ukraine) was already played in 1908.
The two Lwów clubs finished third and fourth in the Galician championship of 1913. The first ever Bukovina championship in 1908 was won by a club from Czernowitz, which had been founded in 1903.
After World War I; Galicia, including its currently Ukrainian cities, came to Poland, and the Bukovina, including the capital Czernowitz which is now in the Ukraine, to Romania.

City name correspondences: 
German           Ukrainian        Polish           Romanian
Czernowitz       Chernivtsy       Czerniowce       Cernăuţi
Lemberg          Lviv             Lwów             Liov

Galician Championship

1913     3.Pogoń Lwów
1913     4.Czarny Lwów

Bukovina Championship

1908     1.Deutscher Fußball Klub Czernowitz

Poland

Belarus | Lithuania | Ukraine

When Poland was recreated after the first World War, it obtained various regions east of its current borders, which now lie in Lithuania (mainly the region around the current capital Vilnius, Wilno in Polish), Belarus (including cities such as Brest/Brześć, Hrodna/Grodno and Pinsk/Pińsk) and the Ukraine (including cities such as Lviv/Lwów/Lemberg, Lutsk/Łuck, Rivne/Równe and Ivano-Frankivsk/Stanisławów). In particular the clubs from Lwów played an important role in Polish football: when the first 'nationwide' Polish league was created in 1927, 3 of its 14 participants came from Lwów, as many as Warszawa (Warsaw) had, and more than for instance Kraków and Łódź (both 2). Before, Pogoń Lwów had won four consecutive Polish championships (1922 to 1926; no championship was organised in 1924 due to preparations for the Olympic Games in Paris) and Sparta Lwów had reached the first Polish cup final in 1926 (the only cup tournament organised in Poland prior to 1950).

Belarussian clubs in the Polish football structure

No clubs from current Belarus reached the first division of the Polish league (or the latter stages of the national championship playoffs in the early seasons in which no national league was organised). One club reached the final stage (last 4) of the second division promotion playoffs, on two occasions: 82 pp Brześć in 1930 (they finished third; the playoff was won by Lechia Lwów who were promoted) and 1931 (when they lost 1-4, 1-3 to 22 pp Siedlce in the semifinals). Other clubs from the region to have entered the regional playoffs of the second division (played in 4 groups of 3 or 4 clubs each) are: 4 dspanc. Brześć, WKS Brześć, Ruch Brześć and Pogoń Brześć; Cresovia Grodno, WKS Grodno and 76 pp Grodno; and Kotwica Pińsk and KPW Ognisko Pińsk.

As an aside, note that the Polish region around Białystok (Belastok in Belarussian, Belostok in Russian) was occupied by the Soviet Union from 1939 to 1944 and as such part of the Belarussian Soviet Socialist Republic. No information on football activities during this period is available.

City name correspondences: 
Polish           Belarussian      Russian
Brześć           Brest            Brest
Grodno           Hrodna           Grodno
Pińsk            Pinsk            Pinsk

Championship

No club from the region played in the Polish national championship.

Lithuanian clubs in the Polish football structure

Five clubs based in Wilno, currently as Vilnius the capital of Lithuania, played one season at the Polish top level. Two other clubs from the city reached the regional playoffs of the second division (played in 4 groups of 3 or 4 clubs each): Ognisko Wilno and Makkabi Wilno.

City name correspondence: 
Polish           Lithuanian
Wilno            Vilnius

Championship

Strzelec Wilno (1 top level season (played in 2 groups))
1922     4.Strzelec Wilno           6  1  0  5   9-33   2  [northern group]

Lauda Wilno (1 top level season (played in 2 groups))
1923     3.Lauda Wilno              6  1  1  4   4-26   3  [eastern group]
 
Pogoń Wilno (1 top level season (played in 3 groups))
1925     2.Pogoń Wilno              4  1  0  3   5-11   2  [eastern group]

1 pp. leg. Wilno (1 top level season (played in 3 groups))
1926     3.1 pp. leg. Wilno         4  0  0  4   2-27   0  [northern group]

Śmigły Wilno (1 top level season)
1938    10.Śmigły Wilno            18  5  1 12  29-50  11
Ukrainian clubs in the Polish football structure

Clubs from towns and cities currently in the Ukraine played an important role in Polish football before the second World War. Before the introduction of a nationwide league in 1927 (an initial 5-team league was also played in 1921), Pogoń Lwów won 4 national championships; 4 different clubs from Lwów played one or more seasons in the first division (Pogoń entering each and every one of them), and a fifth reached the final of the only Polish cup tournament held prior to 1950. Various clubs from other towns reached the later stages of the second level promotion playoffs: Sokół Równe, WKS Hallerczyk Równe and Hasmonea Równe; Policyjny KS Łuck (who reached the final 4-team playoff in 1938, finishing fourth and last); Junak Drohobycz (who reached the final 4-team playoff in 1939, which was abandoned after 2 from 6 rounds due to the war); Rewera Stanisławów (who reached the second level semifinals in 1934, losing 0-5, 1-0 to Śląsk Świętochłowice) and Strzelec Górka Stanisławów; Pogoń Stryj; and Strzelec Janowa Dolina, from a basalt mining village on the Horyń/Horyn river near Kostopol/Kostopil, destroyed by Ukrainian nationalists in April 1943.

City name correspondences: 
Polish           Ukranian         German           Russian
Drohobycz        Drohobych                         Drogobych
Łuck             Lutsk
Lwów             Lviv             Lemberg          Lvov
Równe            Rivne                             Rovno
Stanisławów      Ivano-Frankivsk (since 1962)
Stryj            Stryj                             Stryy

Championship

Pogoń Lwów (18 top level seasons (all held before World War II))
1921     4.Pogoń Lwów               8  3  0  5  19-13   6
1922     1.Pogoń Lwów               8  6  1  1  42-12  13  [group and playoff]
1923     1.Pogoń Lwów               9  8  0  1  48- 6  16  [group and playoff]
         NB: includes third leg (playoff) of final against Wisła Kraków,
             which Pogoń won 2-1 after extra time
1925     1.Pogoń Lwów               8  7  1  0  20- 4  15  [both group stages]
1926     1.Pogoń Lwów               8  6  2  0  37- 7  14  [both group stages]
1927     4.Pogoń Lwów              26 13  3 10  85-42  29
1928     6.Pogoń Lwów              28 14  3 11  61-55  31
1929     9.Pogoń Lwów              24  7  5 12  43-48  19
1930     7.Pogoń Lwów              22  4 11  7  34-36  19
1931     4.Pogoń Lwów              22 11  6  5  47-33  29
1932     2.Pogoń Lwów              22 13  2  7  32-24  28
1933     2.Pogoń Lwów              20 12  4  4  48-20  28  [both group stages]
1934     6.Pogoń Lwów              22 12  0 10  41-38  24
1935     2.Pogoń Lwów              20 11  3  6  55-31  25
1936     6.Pogoń Lwów              18  9  1  8  36-29  19
1937     6.Pogoń Lwów              18  6  3  7  19-23  15
1938     5.Pogoń Lwów              18  9  1  8  23-26  19
1939     3.Pogoń Lwów              13  7  2  4  27-22  16
NB: league abandoned due to start World War II

Czarni Lwów (7 top level seasons)
1927     9.Czarni Lwów             26 11  2 13  45-50  24
1928     8.Czarni Lwów             28 13  3 12  54-51  29
1929    11.Czarni Lwów             24  7  4 13  59-63  18
1930     9.Czarni Lwów             22  5  9  8  25-40  19
1931    10.Czarni Lwów             22  7  2 13  28-50  16
1932    11.Czarni Lwów             22  6  4 12  24-39  16
1933    11.Czarni Lwów             20  8  3  9  30-33  16  [both group stages]

Hasmonea Lwów (2 top level seasons)
1927    11.Hasmonea Lwów           26  8  7 11  55-78  24
1928    13.Hasmonea Lwów           28  6  3 19  43-71  15

Lechia Lwów (1 top level season)
1931    12.Lechia Lwów             22  5  1 16  23-66  11

Cup

1926: finalists: Sparta Lwów             (1-2 vs Wisła Kraków)
      quarterf:: Sokół Równe             (0-4 vs Sparta Lwów)

Germany

Denmark | France | Lithuania | Poland | Russia

Danish clubs in the German football structure

The region just north of the current Danish-German border, Nordschleswig (in German) or Sønderjylland (in Danish), belonged to the German Reich until 1920. The main towns in the region are Aabenraa (also written Åbenrå - this is the correct spelling since 1948 but locally the old spelling is preferred; the German name is Apenrade), Haderslev (Hadersleben), Ribe (Ripen), Sønderborg (Sonderburg) and Tønder (Tondern).

No clubs from the region participated in the later stages of the German championship tournaments, but regional championships were held. Clubs to have been founded when the region belonged to Germany include: Svensk Gymnastikforening (in Haderslev, 1891), Haderslev Fodsports Club (in the summer of 1901), Haderslev FK (July 14, 1906; possibly as Haderslebener Fußball Club), Toftlund Idrætsforening (June 7, 1908), Ribe BK (May 17, 1917; they reached the second round of the Danish Cup 1960/61) and Sønderborg BK (1919; they reached the second round of the Danish Cup 1957/58, 1962/63 and 1978/79 before merging with UI Ulkebøl into UIU/Sønderborg (reached the second round of the Danish Cup 1990/91) and then with Ulkebøl BK into SUB Sønderborg (reached the third round of the Danish Cup in 1991/92)). Aabenraa BK (reached the 1/8 finals of the Danish Cup 1964/65, 1971/72 and 1988/89) and Tønder SF (reached the third round, then the last before the 1/8 finals, of the Danish Cup 1971/72) were founded in 1920, the year the region became Danish (though football is reported to have been played in Tønder as early as 1865).

Haderslev FK won the regional championship of Sønderjylland in 1908 (with an 11-1 win over Sønderborg; this club possibly was a forerunner of Sønderborg BK, now SUB Sønderborg) and 1910 (beating Skarve IF in the final). Haderslev FK reached the 1/8 finals (round of 16) of the Danish Cup in 1955/56 and won their first ever promotion to the Danish first division (Superligaen) in 2000; during the winter break of their first season in the top flight, 2000/01, the club changed name to HFK Sønderjylland (technically, a 'superstructure' was formed and Haderslev FK resumed playing at amateur level). HFK Sønderjylland were relegated in 2001 but returned to the top flight in 2005/06, now playing as SønderjyskE (name change in 2003; this club reached the 1/8 finals of the Danish Cup in 2004/05, 2006/07 and 2007/08), and again suffering immediate relegation; they were promoted again at the end of the 2007/08 season.

French clubs in the German football structure

Until the end of the first World War, the Elsaß (Alsace) and Lothringen (Lorraine) regions were German, and clubs from its main cities Straßburg/Strasbourg, Mülhausen/Mulhouse (both Elsaß) and Metz (Lothringen) played in the southern German Verband süddeutscher Fußballvereine. Until 1903, only a regional championship was played, and the Straßburger FV won it twice around the turn of the century. No club from the region could do so afterwards, and so none ever qualified for the German championship playoffs. After the first World War, the area came to France, before briefly returning to Germany during the second World War.

 
Championship VSF (southern Germany)

1898: stage?     Straßburger FV          (lost to Freiburger FC)
      stage?     FC Mülhausen 93         (lost to Freiburger FC)
1899: winners:   Straßburger FV          (4-3 vs Karlsruher FV)
1900: winners:   Straßburger FV          (beat Karlsruher FV in final)
1902: quarterf.: Straßburger FV          (2-7 vs Karlsruher FV)
1903: quarterf.: Straßburger FV          (scratched vs Karlsruher FV)
      prel. rd.: Straßburger FC Donar    (0-7 vs Straßburger FV)
1904: quarterf.: Straßburger FV          (lost to Karlsruher FV)
1905: group st.: FC Mülhausen/Elsaß 93   (3rd (of 4) in Südkreis (1 of 2))
1910: group st.: Straßburger FV          (8th (of 9) in Südkreis (1 of 4))
1911: group st.: Straßburger FV          (8th (of 10) in Südkreis (1 of 4))
1912: group st.: Straßburger FV          (9th (of 11) in Südkreis (1 of 4))
1914: group st.: FV Metz                 (8th (of 8) in Westkreis (1 of 4))
Lithuanian clubs in the German football structure

The Lithuanian city of Klaipėda was founded as Memel in 1250 and belonged to the German Reich until 1923, when Lithuania annexed the area around the city. Clubs from Klaipėda entered the Lithuanian league between 1924 and 1939 (when Germany invaded the area again), but also entered the German league structure in various seasons; the SpVgg. Memel twice reached the final stage of the championship of the Baltenverband (which also included many areas on the now Polish coast and the Russian exclave Kaliningrad/Königsberg), from which the winners qualified for the German championship playoffs. Note that the club also played in the Lithuanian league structure (as Spielvereinigung Klaipėda) during this time, finishing second in the Klaipėda group in 1928 (winners KSS, who eventually claimed the championship in a final round with other regional group winners), third in 1929 (winners again KSS, who again claimed the Lithuanian championship as well; second were Freya Klaipėda who later entered the Sportbereich 1 Ostpreußen during the war) and second again in 1930 (again behind KSS who once more claimed the national title).

In 1931, a national league was formed in Lithuania (as opposed to the regional groups played between 1924 and 1930); in this, Freya Klaipėda played for two seasons (finishing 3rd in 1931 and 7th in 1932) and the Spielvereinigung Klaipėda for one (finishing 5th in 1933).

Below we list all appearances of Memel clubs in the Endrunde of the Baltenverband, and in the Sportbereich 1 Ostpreußen (formerly Gauliga Ostpreußen) during the war.

Championship

Baltenverband - Endrunde (played by 5 clubs)
1927/28  5.SpVgg. Memel             4  0  1  3   4-10   1
1928/29  3.SpVgg. Memel             6  3  0  3  13-13   6

Sportbereich 1 Ostpreußen
1940/41  7.VfB Freya Memel         12  0  0 12   6-63   0
Polish clubs in the German football structure

In this section all performances in the German championship playoffs by clubs from towns and cities currently in Poland, but part of Germany before World War II, are listed. For clubs in areas of Poland conquered by Germany during World War II, see the section on occupations.

Note that this section, as a matter of convenience, also includes Danzig, which was formally autonomous between the two World Wars as Freistaat Danzig and as such comparable to the Free State of Trieste after World War II.

We split the period in question into two parts - before and after 1933; not directly for political reasons, but because the Nazi government of the German Reich reorganised the football structure that year, introducing fifteen Gauligen to replace the regional federations which each had their own championship systems, and adding a group stage to the national championship playoff (which had been entirely knock-out based until then).
Cities to have been represented, prior to 1933, by one or more clubs in the final regional round (Baltenverband or Südostdeutschland) before the national playoffs include: Allenstein/Olsztyn, Beuthen/Bytom, Breslau/Wrocław, Danzig/Gdańsk, Elbing/Elbląg, Glatz/Kłodzko, Gleiwitz/Gliwice, Graudenz/Grudziądz (prior to 1920, when the city was incorporated into Poland), Hindenburg/Zabrze, Hirschberg/Jelenia Góra, Jauer/Jawor, Kattowitz/Katowice, Liegnitz/Legnica, Marienwerder/Kwidzyn, Neufahrwasser/Nowy Port, Posen/Poznań (prior to 1920, when the city was incorporated into Poland), Rastenburg/Kętrzyn (Polish name Rastembork until 1950), Sagan/Żagań, Schneidemühl/Piła, Stettin/Szczecin, Stolp/Słupsk, Thorn/Toruń (prior to 1920, when the city was incorporated into Poland), Waldenburg/Wałbrzych and Züllichau/Sulechów.
The following currently Polish cities were represented in the Gauliga Ostpreußen: Allenstein/Olsztyn, Braunsberg/Braniewo, Danzig/Gdańsk, Elbing/Elbląg, Goldap/Gołdap, Gollnow/Goleniów, Lauenthal/Letnica (now district of Gdańsk), Lyck/Ełk, Mlawa/Mława (renamed Mielau 1941), Neufahrwasser/Nowy Port (now district of Gdańsk), Ortelsburg/Szczytno, Osterode/Ostróda and Rastenburg/Kętrzyn (Polish name Rastembork until 1950).
The following currently Polish cities were represented in the Gauliga Pommern: Dievenow/Dziwnów, Groß Bron/Borne Sulinowo (after HSV Hubertus Kolberg was relocated and renamed HSV Groß Born in November 1943), Kolberg/Kołobrzeg, Kamp-Köslin/Kepa Koszalin, Köslin/Koszalin, Lauenburg/Lębork, Neustettin/Szczecinek, Pommerensdorf/Pomorzany (now district of Szczecin), Schneidemühl/Piła, Stettin/Szczecin, Stolp/Słupsk, Stolpmünde/Ustka and Swinemünde/Świnoujście.
The following currently Polish cities were represented in the Gauliga Schlesien: Beuthen/Bytom, Bismarckhütte/Hajduki Wielkie (now district of Chorzów), Breslau/Wrocław, Brieg/Brzeg, Gleiwitz/Gliwice, Haynau/Chojnów, Hindenburg/Zabrze, Kattowitz/Katowice, Klausberg (before 1936 Mikultschütz)/Mikulczyce (now district of Zabrze), Klettendorf/Klecina (now district of Wrocław), Knurow/Knurów, Königshütte/Chorzów (before 1934 Królewska Huta), Liegnitz/Legnica, Lipine/Lipiny (now district of Świętochłowice), Myslowitz/Mysłowice, Oels/Oleśnica, Ratibor/Racibórz, Rybnik/Rybnik (only in the abandoned 1944/45 season), Scharley/Szarlej (now district of Piekary Śląskie; only in the abandoned 1944/45 season), Schweidnitz/Świdnica, Schwientochlowitz/Świętochłowice and Tarnowitz/Tarnowskie Góry.
In 1943/44, Lower Silesian football was divided into various smaller sections (Bezirksgruppen Niederschlesien), which meant clubs from a number of towns reached the 'first German football level' for the first time ever: in the Görlitz group: Hirschberg/Jelenia Góra (had been represented prior to 1933), Kittlitztreben/Kotlicki Trebin and Lauban/Lubań; in the Liegnitz group: Glogau/Głogów, Jauer/Jawor (had been represented prior to 1933), Lüben/Lubin and Sprottau/Szprotawa; and in the Bergland group: Altwasser/Stary Zdrój (now district of Wałbrzych), Dittersbach/Podgórze II (earlier Polish name Dietrzychów; now district of Wałbrzych), Freiburg/Świebodzice, Glatz/Kłodzko, Neurode/Nowa Ruda, Striegau/Strzegom, Waldenburg/Wałbrzych (had been represented prior to 1933) and Weißstein/Biały Kamień (now district of Wałbrzych).
Deblin/Dęblin never had a 'first level' team but its air force team reached the 1/8 finals of the 1942 cup.

Five clubs from the region reached the semifinals of the German championship: Titania Stettin and Breslauer Sportfreunde both in 1920, Breslauer SC in 1929 (all lost their semifinal ties to the then leading clubs from the Franconian agglomeration Nürnberg/Fürth) and Vorwärts-Rasensport Gleiwitz (the strongest club from the region during the nazi regime) in 1936; in addition, an army side, Heeres SV Groß Born, did so during the war (1944). TuS Lipine reached the semifinals of the 1942 cup.

Germania Königshütte also deserve a special mention, not so much for their three entries in the German championship play-offs during the war (their best performance being a 1/8 final loss away to Vienna in 1942) but for finishing runners-up of the Polish league 1937 under their then name of AKS Chorzów. The club were founded as VfR Königshütte in 1910, when their home town was part of the German Kaiserreich; after Königshütte became Polish (as Królewska Huta) in 1922, they played in the Polish league structure from 1923 to 1939, as AKS Królewska Huta until 1934 and as AKS Chorzów since, following the name change of the town. Their second place in 1937 was quite remarkable because they had been promoted the season before. Even more unusual, the other club promoted in 1936, Cracovia from Kraków, won the title ahead of AKS Chorzów. After the war, AKS Chorzów were resurrected and finished third in the Polish championship on two more occasions (1946 and 1947) before slipping to lower divisions; the club still exists as AKS Wyzwolenie Chorzów.

Finally, we mention 1. FC Kattowitz. They did not enjoy any remarkable success during the period the city belonged to Germany (until the split of Upper Silesia in the summer of 1922), but after the town had come to Poland, this ethnic German club played three seasons in the Polish top level, from 1927 to 1929, finishing runners-up in the first season after a controversial home loss to eventual champions Wisła Kraków a few weeks before the end of the season. The club was dissolved after the war but resurrected in 2007; their women team reached the top Polish league level in 2010 but were relegated after two seasons.

Championship - until 1933

1905: prel. rd.: SC Schlesien Breslau    (scratched vs FC Viktoria Magdeburg)
1906: quarterf.: SC Schlesien Breslau    (1-7 vs Hertha 92 Berlin)
1907: quarterf.: SC Schlesien Breslau    (1-2 vs Viktoria 89 Berlin)
1908: quarterf.: VfR 1897 Breslau        (1-3 vs FC Wacker Leipzig)
1910: quarterf.: VfR 1897 Breslau        (1-2 vs FC Tasmania Rixdorf)
1912: quarterf.: BuEV Danzig             (0-7 vs Viktoria 89 Berlin)
      quarterf.: ATV Liegnitz            (2-3 vs SpVgg. Leipzig-Lindenau)
1920: semifinal: FC Titania Stettin      (0-3 vs 1.FC Nürnberg)
      semifinal: Breslauer Sportfreunde  (0-4 vs SpVgg. Fürth)
1921: quarterf.: Stettiner SC            (1-2 vs Vorwärts 90 Berlin)
      quarterf.: Breslauer Sportfreunde  (1-2 vs Wacker Halle)
1922: quarterf.: FC Titania Stettin      (0-5 vs Hamburger SV)
1923: quarterf.: Breslauer Sportfreunde  (0-4 vs SpVgg. Fürth)
1924: quarterf.: Breslauer Sportfreunde  (0-3 vs Hamburger SV)
1925: quarterf.: Breslauer SC 1908       (1-4 vs 1.FC Nürnberg)
      1/8 final: FC Titania Stettin      (2-4 vs Altona 1893)
1926: quarterf.: Breslauer SC 1908       (0-4 vs SpVgg. Fürth)
      1/8 final: Stettiner SC            (2-8 vs Holstein Kiel)
1927: 1/8 final: Breslauer FV 1906       (0-3 vs VfB Leipzig)
      1/8 final: Breslauer Sportfreunde  (1-3 vs SpVgg. Fürth)
      1/8 final: Stettiner SC            (1-9 vs Holstein Kiel)
1928: 1/8 final: Breslauer SC 1908       (2-3 vs VfB Königsberg)
      1/8 final: Breslauer Sportfreunde  (0-7 vs Hertha BSC)
      1/8 final: SC Preußen Stettin      (1-4 vs Holstein Kiel)
1929: semifinal: Breslauer SC 1908       (1-6 vs SpVgg. Fürth)
      1/8 final: FC Titania Stettin      (2-3 aet vs Tennis Borussia Berlin)
      1/8 final: Preußen Hindenburg      (1-8 vs Hertha BSC)
1930: 1/8 final: Breslauer Sportfreunde  (0-7 vs 1.FC Nürnberg)
      1/8 final: FC Titania Stettin      (2-4 vs SpVgg. Sülz 1907)
      1/8 final: Beuthener SuSV 1909     (2-3 vs Hertha BSC)
1931: 1/8 final: Beuthener SuSV 1909     (0-2 vs Hamburger SV)
      1/8 final: VfB Liegnitz            (1-6 vs Tennis Borussia Berlin)
1932: 1/8 final: Beuthener SuSV 1909     (1-5 vs Chemnitzer PSV)
      1/8 final: Hindenburg Allenstein   (0-6 vs Eintracht Frankfurt)
      1/8 final: SV Viktoria Stolp       (0-3 vs Tennis Borussia Berlin)
1933: quarterf.: Hindenburg Allenstein   (2-12 vs Eintracht Frankfurt)
      quarterf.: Beuthener SuSV 1909     (0-3 vs 1860 München)
      1/8 final: Vorwärts-Ras. Gleiwitz  (0-9 vs Fortuna Düsseldorf)

Championship - since 1933

1934 Gp1 2.Beuthener SuSV 1909      6  3  1  2  12-13   7
     Gp1 3.SV Viktoria Stolp        6  1  2  3  10-12   4
     Gp1 4.Preußen Danzig           6  0  1  5   6-18   1
1935 Gp1 3.Vorwärts-Ras. Gleiwitz   6  2  1  3   9-11   5
     Gp2 4.Stettiner SC             6  0  1  5   5-29   1
1936 Gp2 1.Vorwärts-Ras. Gleiwitz   6  5  0  1  21- 9  10
      semifinal: Vorwärts-Ras. Gleiwitz  (1-3 vs Fortuna Düsseldorf;
                                          Vorwärts-Rasensport lost 
                                          playoff for 3rd place vs
                                          Schalke 04 (1-8))
     Gp1 4.Hindenburg Allenstein    6  0  0  6   6-24   0
     Gp2 4.SV Viktoria Stolp        6  1  0  5   4-20   2
1937 Gp1 3.Hindenburg Allenstein    6  1  2  3  10-21   4 
     Gp1 4.Beuthener SuSV 1909      6  1  1  4  12-20   3
     Gp2 4.SV Viktoria Stolp        6  0  0  6   1-36   0
1938 Gp1 3.Stettiner SC             6  2  0  4  12-18   4
     Gp3 4.Vorwärts-Ras. Gleiwitz   6  1  1  4   9-20   3
1939 Gp1 3.Hindenburg Allenstein    6  2  1  3  10-12   5
     G2a 3.SV Viktoria Stolp        4  1  0  3   1- 8   2
     Gp4 2.Vorwärts-Ras. Gleiwitz   6  4  0  2  12-11   8
1940 G1a 3.VfL Stettin              4  0  0  4   5-13   0
     G1b 2.Vorwärts-Ras. Gleiwitz   4  1  2  1  11-11   4
1941 G1a 1.Vorwärts-Ras. Gleiwitz   4  2  1  1   9- 5   5
     G1a 2.Luftwaffen SV Stettin    4  1  2  1   8- 9   4
     G1a 3.Preußen Danzig           4  0  3  1   5- 8   3
      playoff:   Vorwärts-Ras. Gleiwitz  (0-3, 0-3 vs Dresdner SC)
1942: 1/8 final: Breslau 02              (1-2 aet vs Planitzer SC)
      1/8 final: Germania Königshütte    (0-1 vs Vienna)
      qual. rd.: HuS Marienwerder        (1-7 vs VfB Königsberg)
1943: quarterf.: SV Neufahrwasser        (0-4 vs Dresdner SC)
      1/8 final: LSV Reinicke Brieg      (0-8 vs Vienna)
      qual. rd.: Germania Königshütte    (3-4 aet vs LSV Reinicke Brieg)
1944: semifinal: Heeres SV Groß Born     (2-3 vs LSV Hamburg)
      1/8 final: STC Hirschberg          (0-5 vs Vienna) 
      qual. rd.: Germania Königshütte    (2-9 vs Dresdner SC)
      qual. rd.: LSV Danzig              (0-0 aet, 1-7 vs Hertha BSC)
  
Cup (von-Tschammer-Pokal)

1935: 1/8 final: Masovia Lyck            (1-2 vs Dresdner Sportfreunde)
      1/16 fin.: Vorwärts-Ras. Gleiwitz  (2-3 vs Berolina Lichtenberg)
      1/16 fin:: SC Vorwärts Breslau     (2-4 vs Minerva 93 Berlin)
1936: 1/8 final: Hindenburg Allenstein   (1-3 vs VfB Peine)
      1/16 fin.: SV Viktoria Stolp       (1-2 vs Hindenburg Allenstein)
      1/16 fin.: Vorwärts-Ras. Gleiwitz  (2-2 aet, 0-3 vs VfB Leipzig)
      1/16 fin.: Beuthener SuSV 1909     (1-4 vs Berliner SV 92)
1937: 1/16 fin.: Breslauer FV 06         (1-7 vs SpVgg. Fürth)
1938: quarterf.: Vorwärts-Ras. Gleiwitz  (2-4 vs 1.FC Nürnberg)
      1/16 fin.: Hindenburg Allenstein   (o/w vs Hertha BSC)
NB: in 1938, stages refer to the stages in 'Altreich', whose
    quarterfinal winners joined the quarterfinal winners of the
    'Ostmark' in the 'Großdeutschland' quarterfinal stage.
1939: 1/8 final: Vorwärts-Ras. Gleiwitz  (1-6 vs Rapid Wien)
      1/16 fin.: SV Viktoria Stolp       (1-3 vs Blau-Weiß 90 Berlin)
      1/16 fin.: SV Klettendorf          (1-6 vs Berliner SV 92)
1940: 1/8 final: BuEV Danzig             (1-5 vs VfB Königsberg)
      1/16 fin.: VfL Stettin             (0-0 aet, 1-2 vs BuEV Danzig)
1941: quarterf.: LSV Kamp-Köslin         (1-4 vs Dresdner SC)
      1/8 final: Vorwärts-Ras. Gleiwitz  (0-8 vs Austria Wien)
      1/16 fin.: SV Viktoria Stolp       (0-3 vs LSV Kamp-Köslin)
      1/16 fin.: Breslauer SpVg. 02      (1-6 vs Vorwärts-Rasensport Gleiwitz)
1942: semifinal: TuS Lipine              (0-6 vs 1860 München)
      quarterf.: LSV Stettin             (1-4 vs Werder Bremen)
      1/8 final: LSV Adler Deblin        (1-4 vs TuS Lipine)
      1/16 fin.: Breslauer SpVg. 02      (0-4 vs TuS Lipine)
      1/16 fin.: LSV Reinicke Brieg      (1-7 vs LSV Adler Deblin)
      1/16 fin.: SV Neufahrwasser        (2-3 vs LSV Pütnitz)
1943: 1/8 final: Breslauer SpVg. 02      (5-6 vs Vienna)
      1/16 fin.: SV Victoria Elbing      (0-7 vs LSV Pütnitz)
      1/16 fin.: TuS Lipine              (3-5 vs Breslauer SpVg. 02)
Russian clubs in the German football structure

In this section all performances in the German championship playoffs by clubs from towns and cities currently in Russia, but part of Germany before World War II, are listed.
We split the period in question into two parts - before and after 1933; not directly for political reasons, but because the Nazi government of the German Reich reorganised the football structure that year, introducing fifteen Gauligen to replace the regional federations which each had their own championship systems, and adding a group stage to the national championship playoff (which had been entirely knock-out based until then).
Cities to have been represented prior to 1933 by one or more clubs in the final regional round (of the Baltenverband) before the national playoffs include: Königsberg/Kaliningrad, Gumbinnen/Gusev, Insterburg/Černjahovsk and Tilsit/Sovetsk.
The following currently Russian cities were represented in the Gauliga Ostpreußen between 1933 and 1935: Königsberg/Kaliningrad, Gumbinnen/Gusev, Insterburg/Černjahovsk and Tilsit/Sovetsk; after 1935, the Gauliga Ostpreußen was split into four Bezirksklassen, in which additionally the following currently Russian cities were represented: Heiligenbeil/Mamonovo, Labiau/Polessk, Neukuhren/Pionierski and Ponarth (Baltijskij Rayon, district of Kaliningrad).

The best performance by any club from the region was the semifinal appearance of VfB Königsberg in the 1923 championship.

Championship - until 1933

1908: quarterf.: VfB Königsberg          (0-7 vs Viktoria 89 Berlin)
1909: quarterf.: VfB Königsberg          (1-12 vs Viktoria 89 Berlin)
1910: prel. rd.: Prussia-Samland Kgsbg.  (1-5 vs FC Tasmania Rixdorf)
1911: quarterf.: SC Lituania Tilsit      (scratched vs Viktoria 89 Berlin)
1913: quarterf.: Prussia-Samland Kgsbg.  (1-6 vs Viktoria 89 Berlin)
1914: quarterf.: Prussia-Samland Kgsbg.  (1-4 vs VfB Leipzig)
1923: semifinal: VfB Königsberg          (2-3 vs Hamburger SV)
1924: quarterf.: VfB Königsberg          (1-6 vs SpVgg. Leipzig-Lindenau)
1925: 1/8 final: VfB Königsberg          (2-3 aet vs Hertha BSC)
1926: 1/8 final: VfB Königsberg          (0-4 vs Hertha BSC)
1927: 1/8 final: VfB Königsberg          (1-2 vs Hertha BSC)
1928: quarterf.: VfB Königsberg          (0-4 vs Hamburger SV)
1929: 1/8 final: VfB Königsberg          (1-2 vs Breslauer SC 1908)
1930: 1/8 final: VfB Königsberg          (1-8 vs Dresdner SC)
1931: 1/8 final: VfB Königsberg          (1-8 vs Dresdner SC)
      1/8 final: Prussia-Samland Kgsbg.  (2-3 vs Holstein Kiel)
1933: 1/8 final: Prussia-Samland Kgsbg.  (1-7 vs Beuthener SuSV 1909)

Championship - since 1933

1935 Gp1 4.Yorck-Boyen Insterburg   6  0  1  5   8-35   1
1938 Gp1 4.Yorck-Boyen Insterburg   6  0  0  6   4-25   0
1940 G1a 2.VfB Königsberg           4  3  0  1  13-10   6
1941 G2a 3.VfB Königsberg           4  1  0  3   6-11   2
1942: quarterf.: VfB Königsberg          (1-2 vs Blau-Weiß Berlin)
1944: 1/8 final: VfB Königsberg          (3-10 vs Heeres SV Groß Born)

Cup (von-Tschammer-Pokal)

1935: 1/16 fin.: VfB Königsberg          (0-1 vs Masovia Lyck)
1938: 1/16 fin.: Yorck-Boyen Insterburg  (1-4 vs Brandenburger SC 05)
NB: in 1938, 1/16 finals refers to stage in 'Altreich', whose
    quarterfinal winners joined the quarterfinal winners of the
    'Ostmark' in the 'Großdeutschland' quarterfinal stage.
1940: quarterf.: VfB Königsberg          (0-8 vs Dresdner SC)
1941: 1/8 final: VfB Königsberg          (2-3 vs LSV Kamp-Köslin)
      1/16 fin.: STV Königsberg          (0-8 vs VfB Königsberg)
1942: 1/16 fin.: VfB Königsberg          (1-4 vs LSV Stettin)
1943: 1/8 final: VfB Königsberg          (0-5 vs Dresdner SC)

Finland

Russian clubs in the Finnish football structure

The historical region of Karelia (Karjala in Finnish) comprises a large area, part of which is now in Finland (main cities Joensuu and Lappeenranta), and part in Russia. The part belonging to Finland was larger before the second World War, during which the Soviet Union annexed the Karelian Isthmus (Karjalan Kannas), with as main city Viipuri/Vyborg, and Ladoga Karelia, including Sortavala. (Finnish troops reconquered most of the area at some time during the war but eventually Finland had to cede it to the Soviet Union afterwards.)
Viipuri was the second largest city of Finland in the interbellum and its clubs played a significant role in Finnish ice hockey (Reipas Viipuri won the first ever Finnish ice hockey championship in 1928), bandy (Sudet Viipuri won 14 pre-war Finnish championships in this sport, nearly half the available titles) and football (even after World War II, following their relocation: Reipas Lahti and IKissat Tampere (later Ilves Tampere and Tampere United), to name but the two most striking examples, had their roots in Viipuri).
Sudet Viipuri (earlier called WBJS, which denoted Wiipurin Bandy- ja Jalkapalloseura, and as such already semifinalists in the 1916 championship) won the 1940 championship (one season after winning promotion from the second level; however, the 1940 championship was played as a cup competition open to all clubs) and Reipas Viipuri reached 5 championship finals before a nationwide league was established.

From 1941 to 1956, the Karelo-Finnish SSR formed the 16th Soviet Socialist Republic; in 1956 it was 'relegated' to an ASSR (autonomous SSR), the Karelian ASSR, thereby losing its constitutional secession right. It should be mentioned that Russians always formed the (clear) majority of the population in the relevant area, Karelians and Finns forming a minority of around 10%.

Sortavala clubs never played above the second Finnish league level (SoPS, i.e. Sortavalan Palloseura in 1938 and 1939, and SP, i.e. Sortavalan Palloilijat in 1935, 1936, 1938 and 1939). In the late nineties, FK Sortavala and Metallurg Värtsila played in the Finnish league structure as guests.

Apart from the three Viipuri clubs to have reached the first Finnish level (and discussed below), we also mention:

City name correspondences: 
Finnish          Russian          Swedish  
Sortavala        Sortavala        Sordavala  
Viipuri          Vyborg           Viborg
NB: Sortavala earlier also known as Serdobol

Championship

Championships in knock-out style (until 1929)

1908: semifinal: Reipas Viipuri          (1-4 vs PUS Helsinki)
1909: semifinal: Reipas Viipuri          (1-6 vs PUS Helsinki)
1910: finalists: Reipas Viipuri          (2-4 vs ÅIFK Turku)
      semifinal: Ponteva Viipuri         (2-6 vs Reipas Viipuri)
1911: semifinal: Reipas Viipuri          (forfeit vs ÅIFK Turku)
1916: semifinal: WBJS Viipuri            (4-4, 1-12 vs ÅIFK Turku) 
1917: semifinal: Reipas Viipuri          (1-5 vs ÅIFK Turku)
1918: finalists: Reipas Viipuri          (0-3 vs HJK Helsinki)
1919: finalists: Reipas Viipuri          (0-1 vs HJK Helsinki)
1920: semifinal: Reipas Viipuri          (0-2 vs HPS Helsinki)
1922: finalists: Reipas Viipuri          (2-4 vs HPS Helsinki)
1924: semifinal: Sudet Viipuri           (2-8 vs HPS Helsinki)
1925: semifinal: Sudet Viipuri           (3-4 vs TPS Turku)
1926: semifinal: Reipas Viipuri          (2-6 vs TPS Turku)
1927: finalists: Reipas Viipuri          (0-6 vs HPS Helsinki)
1928: semifinal: Sudet Viipuri           (1-4 vs HIFK Helsinki)
1929: semifinal: Sudet Viipuri           (2-6 vs HIFK Helsinki)

Championships in league style (since 1930)

Sudet Viipuri (12 top level seasons)
1931     6.Sudet Viipuri            7  1  2  4  14-22   4
1932     5.Sudet Viipuri           14  6  1  7  32-36  13
1933     3.Sudet Viipuri           14  5  6  3  22-16  16
1934     4.Sudet Viipuri           14  6  3  5  25-25  15
1935     6.Sudet Viipuri           14  7  0  7  31-34  14
1936     4.Sudet Viipuri           14  6  3  5  26-21  15
1937     3.Sudet Viipuri           14  5  6  3  33-27  16
1938     8.Sudet Viipuri           14  4  0 10  26-30   8
1940: champions: Sudet Viipuri           (2-0 vs TPS Turku)
1940/41  3.Sudet Viipuri           14  7  3  4  38-30  17
1942: finalists: Sudet Viipuri           (4-6 vs HT Helsinki)
1943/44  3.Sudet Viipuri            7  4  1  2  12-11   9
NB: Sudet played in Helsinki since 1940 and were officially renamed
    Sudet Helsinki for the 1945 season due to the annexation of
    Viipuri by the Soviet Union; they moved to Kouvola in 1962 and
    last played at the third Finnish level in 1990.

ViPS (Viipurin Palloseura) (2 top level seasons)
1930     4.ViPS Viipuri             7  3  1  3  20-16   7
1931     8.ViPS Viipuri             7  0  3  4   7-25   3
NB: played 2nd division 1935-1939; disappeared after the annexation 
    of Viipuri by the Soviet Union

Reipas Viipuri (1 top level season)
1939     8.Reipas Viipuri          11  2  0  9  18-51   4
NB: after the annexation of Viipuri by the Soviet Union, Reipas
    moved to Lahti and played as Reipas Lahti 1945-1996, winning
    3 Finnish league titles and 7 cups (five in consecutive seasons
    from 1972 to 1976); they last played in the Finnish top level
    in 1991; in 1997, having just been relegated from the second
    to third level, they merged with town rivals and top level side
    Kuusysi Lahti into FC Lahti; the third division side taking
    Reipas' place were renamed Pallo-L Lahti.

Hungary

Austria | Romania | Serbia | Slovakia | Ukraine

At the end of the first World War, the map of Europe was changed considerable compared to how it had looked before, in particular due to the dissolution of the multi-ethnic Habsburg Empire. Hungary was affected in particular. In footballing terms, this did not make much of a difference, as the Budapest championship had dominated proceedings entirely. Until 1926, the top flight was a 'tramway league' restricted to the capital (the same applied to the other Habsburg capital city, Vienna, even longer). However, theoretically other clubs could have won the Hungarian title: there were a (varying) number of regional championships in the country, whose winners played off for the title of provincial champions (Vidéki Bajnok); this club could then challenge the Budapest champions for the Hungarian title. However, the match had to be in Budapest, which caused financial difficulties for the would-be challengers. Prior to the first World War, only one club tried - Kassai AC, from the currently Slovak city of Košice, challenged Ferencváros in 1909 - and lost heavily.

Austrian clubs in the Hungarian football structure

The Burgenland (Őrvidék or Felsőőrvidék in Hungarian, Gradišće in Croatian), a province (Land) in Austria, is named after 4 formerly Hungarian administrative divisions (Komitaten), all named after their main towns, burgen (all were built around castles): Preßburg (Bratislava, Pozsóny, the current capital of Slovakia), Wieselburg (Moson in Hungarian, nowadays part of the Hungarian city Mosonmagyaróvár after merging with Magyaróvár (Ungarisch-Altenburg) in 1939), Ödenburg (Sopron in Hungary) and Eisenburg (Vasvár in Hungary)). The area belonged to the Hungarian part of the Habsburg Empire, and only came to Austria in 1921, though without the intended capital Ödenburg/Sopron, which remained Hungarian following a controversial referendum (so currently all four 'burgen' are outside the 'Austrian' Burgenland).

The probably oldest club from the area, SC Eisenstadt, who played in the Austrian top level for 13 seasons between 1967 and 1987 and won the 1984 Mitropa Cup, was founded 1907 (according to other sources: 1914) as Kismarton FC, and played in regional Hungarian competitions in their first years of existence. As both the first and the second Hungarian level were restricted to Budapest at the time (just as the Austrian top two levels were restricted to Vienna), unfortunately no further data are available.
The currently best club from the Burgenland, SV Mattersburg, who played in the Bundesliga for ten seasons between 2003 and 2013 and lost the Austrian cup final in both 2006 and 2007 against Austria Wien, were founded 1922, just after the area had come to Austria. The third club from the area to have played in the Austrian top level, SC Neusiedl/See, in the Bundesliga for 2 seasons (1982-1984), were founded 1919 under their German name; also for them, no further data on their short time in the Hungarian football structure are available. Other Burgenland clubs to have been founded while the area was Hungarian include SC Pinkafeld (1912), Union FC Frauenkirchen (1919), SC Parndorf (1919) and Güssinger SV (founded 1919 as Németújvári Sport-Club).

City name correspondences: 
German           Hungarian        Croatian
Eisenstadt       Kismarton        Željezno
Frauenkirchen    Fertőboldogasszony
Güssing          Németújvár
Mattersburg      Nagymarton       Materštof
Neusiedl am See  Nezsider         Niuzal
Parndorf         Pándorfalu
Pinkafeld        Pinkafő          Pinkafelj

Vidéki Bajnokság

No club from the region won a regional championship.

Romanian clubs in the Hungarian football structure before 1918

Clubs from currently Romanian cities entered the eastern regional championship (played in various zones in later seasons); clubs from the currently Romanian cities Arad, Cluj, Oradea and Timişoara won regional championships, but no club from the region won the overall provincial championship. For performances of clubs in currently Romanian cities in the Hungarian league structure during the second world war, see the section on occupations.

Among the clubs listed below, Nagyváradi AC later won a Hungarian championship (as the first club from outside Budapest) during the second World War and later also claimed a Romanian championship as IC Oradea; they also were Romanian runners-up in 1923/24, losing the final to Chinezul Timişoara - which was the Romanian name of Temesvári Kinizsi; this club won six consecutive Romanian championships between 1921/22 and 1926/27.

City name correspondences: 
Hungarian        Romanian
Arad             Arad
Kolozsvár        Cluj (Cluj-Napoca)
Nagyvárad        Oradea
Temesvár         Timişoara

Vidéki Bajnokság

eastern/southern groups
1907/08    Kolozsvári Ker. Ak. SE 
1908/09    Kolozsvári Ker. Ak. SE 
1909/10    Aradi AC
           Kolozsvári Ker. Ak. SE 
1910/11    Aradi AC
           Kolozsvári TC
1911/12    Kolozsvári Ker. Ak. SE 
1912/13    Kolozsvári TC
           Nagyváradi AC 
1913/14    Kolozsvári AC
           Temesvári Kinizsi 
1916/17    Temesvári Kinizsi 
1917/18    Temesvári Kinizsi 

overall provincial champions

No club from the region won the overall provincial championship.
Serbian clubs in the Hungarian football structure before 1918

Clubs from currently Serbian cities entered the southern regional championship; thrice, a club from current Subotica won the regional championship; no club from the region won the overall provincial championship. For performances of clubs in currently Serbian cities in the Hungarian league structure during the second world war, see the section on occupations.

Bácska Szabadkai AC (founded 1901) played as Bačka Subotica in the Croatian league structure in 1940/41 and then at the third Hungarian league level during the second world war. In addition to Bácska Szabadkai AC, also Újvideki AC (founded 1910, later Novisadski AK) played in the Hungarian league structure before 1914. Both would reach the top level in Yugoslavia (c.q. the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes, as it was known until 1929) during the interbellum: Bačka in 1923 (when they reached the quarterfinals) and 1925 (reaching the semifinals) and NAK in 1935/36 (reaching the semifinals).
Another club from the region founded during the Habsburg era was OFK Kikinda (founded in 1909 as NAK, presumably for Nagykikindai AK), but no data on their performances before the first world war are available.

City name correspondence: 
Hungarian        Serbian
Nagykikinda      Kikinda
Szabadka         Subotica
Újvidek          Novi Sad

Vidéki Bajnokság

southern group
1908/09    Bácska Szabadkai AC 
1911/12    Bácska Szabadkai AC 
1912/13    Bácska Szabadkai AC 

overall provincial champions

No club from the region won the overall provincial championship.
Slovak clubs in the Hungarian football structure before 1918

Clubs from currently Slovak cities entered the northern regional championship; clubs from current Košice and Prešov won the northern regional championship, and Kassai AC twice claimed the overall provincial championship. On one occasion, Kassai AC challenged Budapest champions Ferencváros for the national title but lost 0-11. For performances of clubs in currently Slovak cities in the Hungarian league structure during the second world war, see the section on occupations.

City name correspondences: 
Hungarian        Slovak           German
Eperjes          Prešov           Eperies (also Preschau since 1939)
Kassa            Košice           Kaschau

Vidéki Bajnokság

northern group
1907/08    Eperjesi TVE 
1908/09    Kassai AC
1909/10    Kassai AC
1910/11    Kassai AC
1911/12      not known
1912/13    Kassai AC

overall provincial champions
1908/09    Kassai AC
1910/11    Kassai AC

national championship
1909: finalists: Kassai AC               (0-11 vs Ferencváros)
1911: final not played
Ukrainian clubs in the Hungarian football structure before 1918

Clubs from cities in Carpathian Ruthenian (Karpatáljá), a region currently belonging to the Ukraine, presumably entered the northern regional championship; none ever won a regional championship. For performances of clubs in currently Ukrainian cities in the Hungarian league structure during the second world war, see the section on occupations.

Vidéki Bajnokság

northeastern group
1913/14    Ungvári AC

overall provincial champions

No club from the region won the overall provincial championship 
(the 1914 edition was not held due to World War I).

Armenia

Azerbaijani clubs in the Armenian football structure

Formally, the region of Nagorno-Karabakh, formerly an autonomous region within the Azerbaijani Socialist Soviet Republic, belongs to Azerbaijan, but it is controlled by the Armenian military since 1994, after a war between the two newly independent countries, and is de facto independent. Two clubs originally from Stepanakert, the main city of the region, moved to Yerevan to play in the Armenian league.
The first was Yerazank, who played 3 seasons at the Armenian top level, from 1993 to 1995 (spring season); their best ever league finish was 8th, in 1993, and they reached the quarterfinals of the cup in 1993/94.
They were followed by Karabakh Stepanakert, who won the fourth level regional championship of Azerbaijan in 1977 to gain promotion to the third level Second League of the Soviet Union, in which they finished third in their zone in 1979. Karabakh first played 4 seasons (from 1995/96 to 1998) as Karabakh Yerevan, with their best league finish 7th in 1995/96 and two quarterfinal appearances in the cup, 1995/96 and 1997/98; in 1999 they entered under the name of Karabakh Stepanakert, but were expelled for financial reasons after playing 15 (from 36) matches; both the first and the second team of the club had been eliminated in the round of 16 (1/8 finals) of the 1998/99 cup. They were renamed Karabakh Yerevan again, won promotion in 2000 and finished 11th in 2001 (and reached the quarterfinals of the cup that year) before changing name to Lernayin Artsakh Yerevan, playing home matches in Kapan in 2002, their 7th top level season, finishing 9th. They withdrew before the start of the 2003 season, returned in 2005, their 8th top level season, from which they withdrew after playing 11 from 16 matches in the first stage. They won promotion in 2006 but declined to enter the top flight in 2007.

Yugoslavia

Trieste clubs in the Yugoslav football structure

In 1945, the city of Trieste/Trst was split between Italy and Yugoslavia (specifically, the Slovenian republic); in 1947, the two parts were reunited as 'Free State of Triest' (which also included nearby towns such as Buje (Buie in Italian), Dekani (Villa Decani), Izola (Isola), Koper (Capodistria), Piran (Pirano) and Umag (Umago)) before the city returned to Italy in 1954 (the other towns mentioned came to Yugoslavia and are now in Croatia (Buje, Umag) or Slovenia (Dekani, Izola, Koper, Piran)).
For three seasons, Poncijana Trst (or Amatori Ponziana Trieste as they were known in Italy) competed in the Yugoslav league structure. This club was a split-off, induced by financial support from the Yugoslav authorities, of third level Italian club Ponziana. For three seasons, SS Ponziana competed in the Italian league structure, suffering relegation to the fourth level, while Poncijana/Amatori Ponziana were in the Yugoslav top division. In 1949, Tito tried to steer Yugoslavia out of Soviet influence, seeking support from western countries, and financial support for Poncijana was reduced. The club then withdrew from the Yugoslav league, merging with SS Ponziana into CS Ponziana, and starting at the fourth level (Promozione Interregionale) in 1949/50. The club still exists at Italian amateur level. See Circolo Sportivo Ponziana 1912-1960.
Note that during the first years of the club's existence, Trieste was part of the Habsburg Empire, but CS Ponziana only played at local level.

Championship

Poncijana Trst (3 top level seasons)
1946/47 11.Poncijana Trst          26  9  2 15  35-50  20
1947/48  7.Poncijana Trst          18  6  4  8  21-45  16
1948/49 10.Poncijana Trst          18  3  4 11  12-45  10

Italy

Croatia | Slovenia | Trieste

Croatian clubs in the Italian football structure

During the interbellum, Italy included regions of current Slovenia and Croatia; clubs from the currently Croatian cities Rijeka (Fiume) and Pula (Pola) therefore entered the Italian competitions (the Free State of Fiume was annexed by Italy in 1924, the other relevant regions in 1921). None of these clubs ever reached the Serie A since its inauguration as a one-group national top level in 1929/30, but US Fiumana were a top level club in 1928/29. They were founded in 1926, as a merger between Gloria Fiume and Olimpia Fiume, who both played at the second level 1925/26 (and had done so in 1924/25, with Gloria finishing second in Girone D). Fiumana played at the second level in the seasons 1926/27, 1927/28 and 1929/30, when they dropped out of Serie B; Grion Pola (full name Gruppo Sportivo Fascio Giovanni Grion Pola) suffered relegation from the third to the fourth level in the same season (they had been a second level club in 1928/29, but were relegated due to the reorganisation of the Italian football structure). Grion Pola then managed two consecutive promotions to reach the Serie B in 1932/33; in their third season there (1934/35), they withdrew at the halfway stage. The last appearance of a club from current Croatia at the second Italian level occurred during the second World War, Fiumana playing in the Serie B for one season (1941/42). Both clubs also participated in the earlier seasons of the Italian cup (as did another Rijeka club, CS Fiume (who also had played at the second level 1928/29), in the abandoned 1926/27 competition), with the highlight being three appearances in the round of 32 and one in the round of 16 by Fiumana.
Clubs from other currently Croatian cities, such as Opatija (Abbazia), Poreč (Parenzo), Rovinj (Rovigno) and Umag (Umago), presumably also played at lower levels in the Italian league structure until the end of the second World War.

After the war, Fiumana gave rise to Kvarner Rijeka, founded 1946 and renamed NK Rijeka in 1954. As such it won 2 Yugoslav and 3 Croatian cups.

Tthe Dalmatian city of Zadar (Zara) was Italian between 1920 and 1944 (though the remainder of the Dalmatian coast belonged to Yugoslavia). At the time of the Italian annexation, at least two clubs, Società Ginnastica Zara and Pro Jadera, affiliated to the FIGC; Società Ginnastica Zara first entered the Seconda Divisione Sud, girone A (marchigiano-umbro), then a third level league, in 1926/27 and finished fourth (from six teams), but withdrew after the season. In 1930/31 they returned, won the Prima Categoria Dalmata, qualifying for the national playoffs for the Prima Categoria, in which they progressed through four rounds before losing the final to Pro Calcio di Modena. The club continued playing in the regional amateur leagues, first changing name to AC Zara and then to AC Dalmazia in 1931/32. During the three seasons from 1937/38 to 1939/40 the club played in the fourth level Prima Divisione organised by the Direttorio IX Zona Marche; during the 1939/40 season, the club had to withdraw after 20 matches while leading the standings. During the war they played no further matches. After the war, AC Dalmazia were refounded as NK Zadar in 1949. This club did not win any honours in Yugoslavia (where they never reached the first level), and to data have not done so in Croatia either, in spite of featuring regularly in the top level (their best league finish to date was sixth, in 1997/98 and 2003/04).

City name correspondences: 
Italian          Croatian
Abbazia          Opatija
Fiume            Rijeka
Parenzo          Poreč
Pola             Pula
Rovigno          Rovinj
Umago            Umag
Zara             Zadar

Championship

US Fiumana (1 top level season)
1928/29 14.US Fiumana              30  4  8 18  32-73  15  [-1]  [girone B]

Cup (Coppa Italia)

1937: 1/16 fin.: US Fiumana              (2-3 vs Bari)
1940: 1/16 fin.: US Fiumana              (0-0, 2-4 vs Liguria)
1941: 1/8 final: US Fiumana              (0-1 aet vs Spezia)
1942: 1/16 fin.: US Fiumana              (0-4 vs Spezia)
Slovenian clubs in the Italian football structure

During the interbellum, Italy included regions of current Slovenia and Croatia. Among the currently Slovenian towns, Izola (Isola) boasted a third level club: Ampelea (founded 1923 as CCG Isola d'Istria (Club Calcistico Giovanile) and renamed after their sponsors in the thirties) played in the Serie C for six seasons, from 1937/38 to 1942/43.
During the last (unofficial) war season, 1943/44, they even played at the (improvised) first level, winning the Zona Venezia Giulia; they then entered the Semifinali Interzona, meeting Venezia and Triestina in the Girone B (Veneto-Venezia Giulia), which was won by Venezia, who eventually finished third (behind Vigili del Fuoco from La Spezia and Torino) in the final playoff. In the 1937/38 Coppa Italia the club reached the second preliminary round (two rounds before the first round proper, the 1/16 finals, at which stage the top level clubs entered). After the war, MNK Izola (Mladinski Nogometni Klub - a precise translation of the old CCG name) kept the colours of Ampelea. They are currently called Avtoplus Korte Izola and play at the third level (3. SNL - zahod) in Slovenia, after playing in the top flight for five seasons (1991/92 to 1995/96; the first three seasons as Belvedur Izola) and playing the first round of the 1992/93 UEFA Cup (losing 0-8 on aggregate to Benfica of Lisbon).
Another club, Capodistria, from the currently Slovenian city of Koper, played at the fourth level (Seconda Divisione) of the Italian league structure for at least two seasons (1928/29, the last season before the introduction of the Serie A al girone unico, and 1929/30, in which season they withdrew). Presumably other clubs from towns now in Slovenia (such as Dekani (Villa Decani) and Piran (Pirano)) played at the fourth level (or below) as well, but further details are not available.
A special case is the city of Gorizia (Gorica), which was split into two parts in 1947; the currently Slovenian part is known as Nova Gorica (most of it was built after the split, in which Yugoslavia obtained the railway station and Italy the old centre of the city) and home of one of the country's top clubs: ND Gorica won 4 championships and 2 cups since 1991. In Italy, the club Pro Gorizia played 3 seasons (between 1945 and 1948) in the Serie B (after having earlier played there in 1925/26 and 1928/29, before the reorganisation of Italian league football).

City name correspondences: 
Italian          Slovenian        German
Capodistria      Koper
Gorizia          Gorica           Görz
Isola            Izola
Pirano           Piran
Villa Decani     Dekani

Ampelea (Isola d'Istria) (1 (unofficial) top level season)
1943/44  1.Ampelea                 14 10  2  2  35-17  22  [zona Venezia Giulia]
         2.Ampelea                  3  1  0  2   2- 4   2  [Veneto-Venezia Giulia]
Trieste clubs in the Italian football structure

The city of Trieste came to Italy after the first World War; it had earlier belonged to the Habsburg Empire. After the second World War, the city was first split between Italy and Yugoslavia before it was made 'independent' in 1947 as the Free State of Trieste (also known as Free Territory of Trieste). This state also included various nearby towns, including some now in Slovenia (Dekani/Villa Decani, Izola/Isola, Koper/Capodistria, Piran/Pirano) and Croatia (Buje/Buie, Umag/Umago). The city of Trieste itself was reunified and returned to Italy in 1954. The main football club from the city, Triestina, played in the Serie A for 27 seasons between 1929 and 1959: 14 before or during World War II and 13 since 1946, including all 7 seasons of the existence of the Free State of Trieste (another club, Poncijana Trst, played 3 seasons in the top Yugoslav league division). Below, we only include the 7 league finishes between 1947 and 1954, as Triestina were a 'normal' Italian club in their other 20 Serie A seasons (with the exception of 1946/47, when they were forced to play their home matches outside of Trieste, the city being occupied by Anglo-American troops; because of this, the club were spared relegation in spite of having finished 20th and last that season). Their best ever league finish was their second place in 1947/48 (shared with Milan and Juventus, but 16 points behind champions Torino). In their other 26 seasons, they never finished higher than 6th (1935/36 and 1937/38). They also never reached the Italian cup final, and currently play in Serie B.

Championship

Triestina (7 top level seasons)

1947/48  2.Triestina               40 17 15  8  51-42  49
        NB: Triestina shared second place with Milan and Juventus
1948/49  8.Triestina               38 13 12 13  59-59  38
1949/50  8.Triestina               38 14 12 12  50-59  40
1950/51 15.Triestina               38 10 10 18  45-67  30
1951/52 17.Triestina               38 11 10 17  47-68  32
        NB: Triestina won a playoff against relegation against Lucchese
            and then a promotion/relegation playoff against Brescia
1952/53 15.Triestina               34 10 10 14  47-54  30
1953/54 12.Triestina               34  9 10 15  42-64  28

Cup (Coppa Italia)

No cup tournaments were organised in the relevant period (the
Coppa Italia was not held between 1943 and 1958).

Netherlands

German clubs in the Dutch football structure

After the second World War, various border 'corrections' were made between (West) Germany and its neighbouring countries. One case is that of various villages near the Dutch-German border, which belonged to the Netherlands between 1949 and 1963, when they were returned to (West) Germany. The following 5 clubs played at the lower levels of the Dutch amateur football structure during that time: FC Fortuna Elten, SV Hoengen (also spelled Höngen), VfR Tüddern, FC Viktoria Schalbruch and FC Wanderlust Süsterseel. Elten is just west of Emmerich and played in the afdeling Gelderland in the seasons not listed below, while the other 4 clubs are from villages in the Selfkant, the region just east of Sittard, and played in the afdeling Limburg during the seasons not listed below.
None of these clubs ever played higher than the Vierde Klasse KNVB, the fourth amateur level, which was the fourth level overall in 1949/50 but had become the seventh level overall by 1962/63, due to the introduction of professional football in the Netherlands in 1954. (Note that most seasons had 48 such (amateur) fourth level groups, 8 in each of the six regional divisions, all containing 12 clubs (occasionally groups with 11 or 13 clubs were formed); the three amateur levels above the Vierde Klasse were the Eerste Klasse (6 groups), Tweede Klasse (12 groups) and Derde Klasse (24 to 30 groups), with each group containing between 10 and 12 clubs.) VfR Tüddern is the only club of the five never to have been relegated from this level, and twice participated in promotion playoffs to the Derde Klasse KNVB, the third amateur level.

Championship

VfR Tüddern (14 seasons at 4e klasse KNVB)
1949/50  1.VfR Tüddern             22 18  2  2  64-17  38  [Zuid II 4D]
         3.VfR Tüddern              6  1  1  4  10-20   3  [promotion playoff]
1950/51  8.VfR Tüddern             20  8  1 11  47-58  17  [Zuid II 4D]
1951/52  5.VfR Tüddern             20  6  9  5  41-35  19  [-2]  [Zuid II 4D]
1952/53  6.VfR Tüddern             21  8  4  9  48-49  20  [Zuid II 4D]
1953/54  7.VfR Tüddern             21  8  3 10  43-43  19  [Zuid II 4D]
1954/55  6.VfR Tüddern             22 10  2 10  44-49  22  [Zuid II 4D]
1955/56  9.VfR Tüddern             22  5  6 11  37-41  16  [Zuid II 4D]
1956/57  3.VfR Tüddern             22 11  9  2  49-23  31  [Zuid II 4D]
1957/58  3.VfR Tüddern             22 13  5  4  56-33  31  [Zuid II 4D]
1958/59  5.VfR Tüddern             24 10  2 12  53-64  22  [Zuid II 4D]
1959/60  5.VfR Tüddern             20  8  5  7  31-37  21  [Zuid II 4D]
1960/61  5.VfR Tüddern             22 10  4  8  49-38  24  [Zuid II 4E]
1961/62  7.VfR Tüddern             22  8  5  9  39-55  21  [Zuid II 4E]
1962/63  2.VfR Tüddern             22 12  4  6  41-27  28  [Zuid II 4E]
         3.VfR Tüddern              4  0  1  3   5-16   1  [promotion playoff]

FC Wanderlust Süsterseel (11 seasons at 4e klasse KNVB)
1949/50  3.Wanderlust Süsterseel   22  8  8  6  51-45  24  [Zuid II 4D]
1950/51  7.Wanderlust Süsterseel   22  7  5 15  39-41   9  [Zuid II 4D]
1951/52  9.Wanderlust Süsterseel   20  5  4 11  35-57  14  [Zuid II 4D]
1952/53 10.Wanderlust Süsterseel   21  6  5 10  44-45  15  [-2]  [Zuid II 4D]
1953/54 12.Wanderlust Süsterseel   22  6  4 12  36-52  16  [Zuid II 4D]
        12.Wanderlust Süsterseel    1  0  0  1   2- 5   0  [relegation playoff]
1955/56  6.Wanderlust Süsterseel   22  7  8  7  43-45  22  [Zuid II 4D]
1956/57 12.Wanderlust Süsterseel   22  4  7 11  33-63  15  [Zuid II 4D]
        12.Wanderlust Süsterseel    2  1  0  1   1- 4   2  [relegation playoff]
1959/60  2.Wanderlust Süsterseel   20 10  6  4  49-29  26  [Zuid II 4E]
1960/61  3.Wanderlust Süsterseel   22 12  4  6  55-41  28  [Zuid II 4D]
1961/62  6.Wanderlust Süsterseel   22  8  7  7  53-48  23  [Zuid II 4D]
1962/63  7.Wanderlust Süsterseel   22  8  5  9  53-55  21  [Zuid II 4D]

FC Fortuna Elten (2 seasons at 4e klasse KNVB)
1950/51 12.Elten                   21  2  3 16  23-70   7  [Oost 4E]
1957/58 12.Fortuna Elten           22  3  2 17  31-83   8  [Oost 4F]

FC Viktoria Schalbruch (2 seasons at 4e klasse KNVB)
1949/50 11.Viktoria Schalbruch     22  6  3 13  41-73  15  [Zuid II 4D]
1950/51 12.Viktoria Schalbruch     21  3  3 15  27-71   9  [Zuid II 4D]

SV Hoengen (1 season at 4e klasse KNVB)
1949/50 12.Hoengen                 22  3  3 16  28-69   9  [Zuid II 4D]

Roving Clubs

England | Wales | Scotland | (All) Ireland | (Republic of) Ireland | Greece | Turkey | Austria | Switzerland | Spain | Italy | France | Germany | Poland | Slovenia | Lithuania | Latvia | Finland | Sweden | Thailand | Malaysia | Singapore | Cambodia | Australia | Hongkong | China | Philippines | Maldives | Chile | Surinam | Guyana | Saint Martin | Canada | USA

England

Channel Islands | Northern Ireland | Scotland | Wales

Channel Islands clubs in the English football structure

Clubs from the various islands and islets around Great Britain (such as the Channel Islands, the Isle of Man, the Orkney and Scilly Islands) usually play in regional leagues restricted to their own islands, but in 2011, Guernsey FC were founded on Guernsey and were integrated in the English league pyramid.

Northern Irish clubs in the English football structure

Three Belfast clubs entered the FA Cup (first round proper) in the late nineteenth century. Two once reached the round of 32, only to suffer double digit defeats once there. The third Irish club to enter were Linfield in 1888/89, drawing 2-2 at home to Nottingham Forest (who thereby hold the unique record of having played FA Cup ties in all four 'home' countries - they played Queen's Park in Edinburgh in 1885 and Cardiff City away in 1922) in the first round and scratching before the replay.

Cup

1887: 1/16 fin.: Cliftonville            (0-11 vs Partick Thistle)
1890: 1/16 fin.: Distillery              (2-10 vs Bolton Wanderers)
Scottish clubs in the English football structure

In the early years of the FA Cup, Scottish clubs could enter, and in particular Queen's Park came close to collecting the trophy on a few occasions; in 1872 and 1873 they scratched due to travelling costs. We list all Scottish clubs to have reached the round of 16. In 1877, Queen's Park were among the last 10 clubs in the competition (without playing a match - their 0-0 draw at home to Wanderers in 1872 was the only FA Cup match they played until beating Crewe Alexandra 10-0 away in 1883). Apart from the three clubs (Queen's Park, Rangers and Partick Thistle) listed below, four more Scottish clubs entered the FA Cup (first round proper) in the late nineteenth century: Cowlairs (they entered once, in 1886/87, losing 2-3 to Rangers in the third round, after beating Darwen Old Wanderers 4-1 and Rossendale 10-2, both away, and never lost to an English club in the tournament), Heart of Midlothian, Renton and Third Lanark. The 1886/87 season saw all these seven clubs enter the first round proper.
In 1991/92, Gretna became the eighth Scottish club (and the first in over a century) to enter the first round proper, a feat they repeated in 1993/94. Between 1992 and 2002, this club from just across the English border played in the First Division (second level) of the Northern Premier League (overall the seventh level in the English league pyramid). In the first three of these seasons, from 1992/93 to 1994/95, one of their competitors was Welsh side Caernarfon Town (who left for the League of Wales in 1995), making this division the temporary home for clubs from three different UEFA members, probably unique. Gretna reached their best ever finish in that league in their first season, and only came close to emulating it in their last; in 2002 they moved to play 'at home', in the Scottish league structure, where they reached the top flight in 2007 after three successive promotions. They only lasted one season (playing home matches in Motherwell) before folding in 2008, mainly due to the illness and subsequent death of sponsor Brooks Mileson. A new club, Gretna FC, was formed, currently playing in the East of Scotland Football League Division One and hosting matches in Annan (near Gretna).

In 1899, Queen's Park were chosen as the best amateur team of the country to compete for the Sheriff of London (Dewar) Shield, the precursor of the FA Charity Shield (nowadays FA Community Shield). It was the only time in the ten contests for this trophy between 1898 and 1907 that Corinthians were not chosen as the amateur representatives. Queen's Park justified their selection by holding English (professional) champions Aston Villa to a 0-0 draw, meaning both clubs retained the shield for six months.

Northern Premier League First Division

Gretna (best 2 finishes in 10 seasons)
1992/93  6.Gretna                  40 17 12 11  64-47  63    
2001/02  7.Gretna                  42 19  7 16  66-66  63  [-1]
         NB: Gretna had one point deducted

Cup

1872: semifinal: Queen's Park            (0-0, scratched vs Wanderers)
1873: semifinal: Queen's Park            (scratched vs Oxford University)
1877: 1/5 final: Queen's Park            (scratched vs Oxford University)
1884: finalists: Queen's Park            (1-2 vs Blackburn Rovers)
1885: finalists: Queen's Park            (0-2 vs Blackburn Rovers)
1887: semifinal: Rangers                 (1-3 vs Aston Villa)
      1/8 final: Partick Thistle         (0-1 vs Old Westminster)

Sheriff of London Shield
1899: winners:   Queen's Park            (shared: 0-0 vs Aston Villa)
Welsh clubs in the English football structure

Traditionally, Welsh clubs have played in the English professional football structure, while English clubs were invited to enter the Welsh Cup. The FA of Wales did not set up a Welsh first level league until 1992, urged by the desire to obtain representation in the UEFA Champions League and UEFA Cup (until then, Welsh clubs had only entered the Cup Winners' Cup). The major Welsh clubs refused to join and remained active in the English structure, where some of them had achieved a measure of success: Cardiff City won the FA Cup and once missed out on the English championship on goal average (they would have won it had the tie-breaker at the time been goal difference (and then goals scored), as it is now).
In all, two Welsh clubs played at the English top level, Cardiff City and Swansea City (formerly Swansea Town), who are both still playing professionally in England (in 2013/14 they both played at the top level, a first in the history of Welsh football). In addition, Newport County currently play at the fourth level (Division Two) of the English league pyramid, having returned to professional football in 2013 after an absence of a quarter of a century (before, they played in the English league for 60 seasons, 1920-1931 and 1932-1988, reaching the second level (old Second Division) in one season (1946/47). Wrexham played in the English league without interruption between 1921 and 2008 (when they were relegated to the fifth level Conference); they played at the second level (old Second Division) for four seasons (1978/79 until 1981/82), with their best finish there 15th in 1978/79.
Two other Welsh clubs were active in the English league in the past: Aberdare Athletic (6 seasons 1921-1927, all in Third Division (South)) and Merthyr Town (10 seasons 1920-1930, all in Third Division (South)). Several others applied for election to the league but failed to secure the necessary votes: Abertillery Town (1921), Bangor City (1947, 1972), Barry/Barry Town (1921, 1947), Bridgend Town (1948), Ebbw Vale (1927), Llanelly (1922-1923, 1929-1933, 1947, 1950-1951), Lovell's Athletic, who were invited to joint the Western section of the Football League during the Second World War, playing there from 1942/43 to 1944/45 (1948), Merthyr Tydfil (1947-1952, 1954), Mid-Rhondda, based in Tonypandy (1925), Pontypridd (1921-1923) and Rhyl (1929 and 1932).

Many others have played in the various amateur leagues of the English league pyramid; some are still active there while others decided to enter the Welsh structure within a few years after the foundation of the League of Wales, such as Caernarfon Town, who did so in 1995 after playing alongside Scottish club Gretna (and 19 or 20 English ones) in the First Division (second level) of the Northern Premier League (overall the seventh level in the English league pyramid), making this division the temporary home for clubs from three different UEFA members, probably unique.

The heyday of Welsh clubs in the FA Cup was the decade after the Great War, when they were represented by one or two clubs in the round of 16 annually and Cardiff City took the trophy out of England for the only time ever in 1927. We list all appearances of Welsh clubs among the last 16. In 1877/78, Druids reached the third round, which involved only 11 clubs (considered 1/6 finals below); in 1884/85 there was one intermediate round consisting of one tie between the fourth round and the quarterfinals, so we consider that fourth round (which involved 17 clubs) to be equivalent to the 1/8 finals. Apart from the six clubs who reached that stage, the following Welsh clubs entered the first round proper at least once: Aberdare Athletic, Bangor City, Barry Town, Caernarfon Town, Caernarfon Wanderers, Colwyn Bay, Llanelli, Llangollen, Lovell's Athletic, Merthyr Town, Merthyr Tydfil, Mold FC, Newtown, Rhyl (reached the fourth round (1/16 finals) in 1956/57), Ton Pentre (entered once, in 1986/87, losing their first round tie to Cardiff City and so never met an English club in the tournament proper) and Wrexham Olympic.

Apart from being the only non-English club ever to win the trophy, Cardiff City hold the peculiar record of eliminating Leeds United in three successive seasons in the third round (in which both clubs entered the tournament) by an identical scoreline of 2-1: on January 7, 1956, on January 5, 1957, and on January 4, 1958. All three matches were played in Leeds. Groundhog (Satur)day in January...

Welsh clubs reaching the quarterfinals of the League Cup or the final of the League Trophy (for 3rd and 4th level clubs) are listed separately below the FA Cup performances. Swansea City won the League Cup in 2013 and thus became the first Welsh club to represent England in UEFA club competitions since the League of Wales was established in 1992.

As 1927 FA Cup winners, Cardiff City were chosen to represent the 'professionals' in the annual FA Charity Shield, which was usually played between sides selected as best professional and best amateur team at the time. They defeated the amateurs of the Corinthians 2-1 to take that trophy out of England for only the second time (after Queen's Park did so for six months after drawing Aston Villa in the match for the 1899 Sheriff of London (Dewar) Shield, the immediate precursor of the Charity Shield which was played along the same lines).

Championship

Cardiff City (16 top level seasons)
1921/22  4.Cardiff City            42 19 10 13  61-53  48
1922/23  9.Cardiff City            42 18  7 17  73-59  43
1923/24  2.Cardiff City            42 22 13  7  61-34  57
         NB: Huddersfield Town won the league with 57 points and a 
             goal record of 60-33, making a goal average of 1.818;
             Cardiff had 1.794; under current tie-breaking rules,
             Cardiff would have claimed the title.
1924/25 11.Cardiff City            42 16 11 15  56-51  43
1925/26 16.Cardiff City            42 16  7 19  61-76  39
1926/27 14.Cardiff City            42 16  9 17  55-65  41
1927/28  6.Cardiff City            42 17 10 15  70-80  44
1928/29 22.Cardiff City            42  8 13 21  43-59  29
1952/53 12.Cardiff City            42 14 12 16  54-46  40
1953/54 10.Cardiff City            42 18  8 16  51-71  44
1954/55 20.Cardiff City            42 13 11 18  62-76  37
1955/56 17.Cardiff City            42 15  9 18  55-69  39
1956/57 21.Cardiff City            42 10  9 23  53-88  29
1960/61 15.Cardiff City            42 13 11 18  60-85  37
1961/62 21.Cardiff City            42  9 14 19  50-81  32
2013/14 20.Cardiff City            38  7  9 22  32-74  30

Swansea City (5 top level seasons)
1981/82  6.Swansea City            42 21  6 15  58-51  69
1982/83 21.Swansea City            42 10 11 21  51-69  41
2011/12 11.Swansea City            38 12 11 15  44-51  47
2012/13  9.Swansea City            38 11 13 14  47-51  46
2013/14 12.Swansea City            38 11  9 18  54-54  42

FA Cup

1878: 1/6 final: Druids                  (0-8 vs Royal Engineers)
1883: quarterf.: Druids                  (1-4 vs Blackburn Olympic)
1885: 1/8 final: Druids                  (0-1 vs West Bromwich Albion)
1887: 1/8 final: Chirk AAA               (1-2 vs Darwen)
1888: 1/8 final: Chirk AAA               (1-1, 0-1 vs Derby Junction)
1920: 1/8 final: Cardiff City            (1-2 vs Bristol City)
1921: semifinal: Cardiff City            (0-0, 1-3 vs Wolverhampton Wanderers)
1922: quarterf.: Cardiff City            (1-1, 1-2 vs Tottenham Hotspur)
      1/8 final: Swansea Town            (0-4 vs Millwall Athletic)
1923: 1/8 final: Cardiff City            (2-3 vs Tottenham Hotspur)
1924: quarterf.: Cardiff City            (0-0, 1-2 vs Manchester City)
1925: finalists: Cardiff City            (0-1 vs Sheffield United)
1926: semifinal: Swansea Town            (0-3 vs Bolton Wanderers)
1927: winners:   Cardiff City            (1-0 vs Arsenal)
      quarterf.: Swansea Town            (1-3 vs Reading)
1928: 1/8 final: Cardiff City            (1-2 vs Nottingham Forest)
1934: 1/8 final: Swansea Town            (0-1 vs Portsmouth)
1937: 1/8 final: Swansea Town            (0-3 vs Sunderland)
1949: 1/8 final: Cardiff City            (1-2 vs Derby County)
      1/8 final: Newport County          (2-3 vs Portsmouth)
1950: 1/8 final: Cardiff City            (1-3 vs Leeds United)
1952: 1/8 final: Swansea Town            (0-1 vs Newcastle United)
1955: 1/8 final: Swansea Town            (2-2, 0-1 vs Sunderland)
1958: 1/8 final: Cardiff City            (0-0, 1-2 vs Blackburn Rovers)
1961: 1/8 final: Swansea Town            (0-4 vs Burnley)
1964: semifinal: Swansea Town            (1-2 vs Preston North End)
1965: 1/8 final: Swansea Town            (0-0, 0-2 vs Peterborough United)
1972: 1/8 final: Cardiff City            (0-2 vs Leeds United)
1974: quarterf.: Wrexham                 (0-1 vs Burnley)
1977: 1/8 final: Cardiff City            (1-2 vs Everton)
1978: quarterf.: Wrexham                 (2-3 vs Arsenal)
1980: 1/8 final: Swansea City            (0-2 vs West Ham United)
      1/8 final: Wrexham                 (2-5 vs Everton)
1981: 1/8 final: Wrexham                 (1-3 vs Wolverhampton Wanderers)
1994: 1/8 final: Cardiff City            (0-1 vs Luton Town)
1997: quarterf.: Wrexham                 (0-1 vs Chesterfield)
2004: 1/8 final: Swansea City            (1-2 vs Tranmere Rovers)
2008: finalists: Cardiff City            (0-1 vs Portsmouth)
2009: 1/8 final: Swansea City            (1-1, 1-2 vs Fulham)
2010: 1/8 final: Cardiff City            (1-4 vs Chelsea)
2014: 1/8 final: Cardiff City            (1-2 vs Wigan Athletic)
      1/8 final: Swansea City            (1-3 vs Everton)

FA Charity Shield

1927: winners:   Cardiff City            (2-1 vs Corinthians)

League Cup

1961: quarterf.: Wrexham                 (0-3 vs Aston Villa)
1966: semifinal: Cardiff City            (2-5, 1-5 vs West Ham United)
1978: quarterf.: Wrexham                 (1-3 vs Liverpool)
2012: finalists: Cardiff City            (2-2 aet, 2-3 pen vs Liverpool)
2013: winners:   Swansea City            (5-0 vs Bradford City)

Football League Trophy

NB: also known as Associate Members Cup; for 3rd and 4th level clubs

1994: winners:   Swansea City            (1-1 aet, 3-1 pen vs Huddersfield Town)
2005: winners:   Wrexham                 (2-0 aet vs Southend United)
2006: winners:   Swansea City            (2-1 vs Carlisle United)

Wales

English clubs in the Welsh football structure

Clubs from nearby regions in England used to enter the FA of Wales Cup, and won it on 21 occasions, including the last 8 editions prior to the Second World War (and the first after it); in addition, on 27 occasions the losing finalists were from England. Five finals were all-English affairs. Most successful were Shrewsbury Town, who won 6 Welsh cups (in 9 final appearances), followed by Chester (currently Chester City), who won 3 (and lost 10 finals; their 13 final appearances are the fifth highest total (shared with Druids) after Wrexham, Cardiff City, Swansea City and Bangor City) and Wellington Town (called Telford United since 1969).

Moreover, one English club, Oswestry Town, entered the League of Wales for a few seasons around the turn of the millennium. They merged into TNS Llansantffraid (from the Welsh village of Llansantffraid-ym-Mechain) before the 2003/04 season. In early 2006, sponsors Total Network Solutions were taken over by British Telecom, and after failed attempts to find a new name sponsor, the club changed name to The New Saints. Starting from the 2007/08 season, The New Saints (who won 5 Welsh championships between 2006/07 and 2013/14, after TNS Llansantffraid had won 3 prior to the merger) play home matches at Park Hall in Oswestry, so once again League of Wales matches are occasionally played in England. Conversely, the playing field of the Deva Stadium of Chester City (relegated from the Football League in 2009 and expelled from the fifth level Conference in 2010), which was opened in 1992, was actually in Wales, although the front gate and access road (as well as the offices in the stadium) were in England.

Various English clubs from the county of Shropshire enter or entered the Welsh league structure: in 2012/13, the Mid Wales South League, at the fifth Welsh league level, included Bucknell FC and Newcastle FC (the latter won the league in 2011/12) while Trefonen FC play in the Montgomeryshire League Division One, also at the fifth Welsh league level; until 2010, Bishop's Castle Town FC also played in the Montgomeryshire League.

Championship

Oswestry Town (3 top level seasons)

2000/01 15.Oswestry Town           34 10  6 18  40-74  36
2001/02 16.Oswestry Town           34  8  6 20  39-84  30
2002/03 16.Oswestry Town           34  6 10 18  36-67  28

Cup

1882: finalists: Northwich Victoria      (0-5 vs Druids)
1884: winners:   Oswestry White Stars    (0-0, 1-0 vs Druids)
1885: finalists: Oswestry White Stars    (1-1, 1-3 aet vs Druids)
1887: finalists: Davenham                (1-2 vs Chirk AAA)
1889: finalists: Northwich Victoria      (1-2 vs Bangor)
1892: winners:   Shrewsbury Town         (5-2 vs Wrexham)
1901: winners:   Oswestry United         (1-0 vs Druids)
1902: winners:   Wellington Town         (1-0 vs Wrexham)
1906: winners:   Wellington Town         (3-2 vs Whitchurch)
      finalists: Whitchurch              (2-3 vs Wellington Town)
1907: winners:   Oswestry United         (2-0 vs Whitchurch)
      finalists: Whitchurch              (0-2 vs Oswestry United)
1908: winners:   Chester                 (3-1 vs Connah's Quay & Shotton)
1909: finalists: Chester                 (0-1 vs Wrexham)
1910: finalists: Chester                 (1-2 vs Wrexham)
1931: finalists: Shrewsbury Town         (0-7 vs Wrexham)
1933: winners:   Chester                 (2-0 vs Wrexham)
1934: winners:   Bristol City            (1-1, 3-0 vs Tranmere Rovers)
      finalists: Tranmere Rovers         (1-1, 0-3 vs Bristol City)
1935: winners:   Tranmere Rovers         (1-0 vs Chester)
      finalists: Chester                 (0-1 vs Tranmere Rovers)
1936: winners:   Crewe Alexandra         (2-0 vs Chester)
      finalists: Chester                 (0-2 vs Crewe Alexandra)
1937: winners:   Crewe Alexandra         (1-1, 3-1 vs Rhyl)
1938: winners:   Shrewsbury Town         (2-2, 2-1 vs Swansea Town)
1939: winners:   South Liverpool         (2-1 vs Cardiff City)
1940: winners:   Wellington Town         (4-0 vs Swansea Town)
1947: winners:   Chester                 (0-0, 5-1 vs Merthyr Tydfil)
1948: finalists: Shrewsbury Town         (0-3 vs Lovell's Athletic)
1953: finalists: Chester                 (1-2 vs Rhyl)
1954: finalists: Chester                 (0-2 vs Fflint Town United)
1955: finalists: Chester                 (1-1, 3-4 vs Barry Town)
1958: finalists: Chester                 (1-1, 1-2 vs Wrexham)
1966: finalists: Chester                 (0-3, 1-0, 1-2 vs Swansea Town)
1968: finalists: Hereford United         (0-2, 1-4 vs Cardiff City)
1970: finalists: Chester                 (0-1, 0-4 vs Cardiff City)
1974: finalists: Stourbridge             (0-1, 0-1 vs Cardiff City)
1976: finalists: Hereford United         (3-3, 2-3 vs Cardiff City)
1977: winners:   Shrewsbury Town         (1-2, 3-0 vs Cardiff City)
1979: winners:   Shrewsbury Town         (1-1, 1-0 vs Wrexham)
1980: finalists: Shrewsbury Town         (1-2, 0-3 vs Newport County)
1981: finalists: Hereford United         (0-1, 1-1 vs Swansea City)
1984: winners:   Shrewsbury Town         (2-1, 0-0 vs Wrexham)
1985: winners:   Shrewsbury Town         (3-1, 2-0 vs Bangor City)
1986: finalists: Kidderminster Harriers  (1-1 aet, 1-2 vs Wrexham)
1989: finalists: Kidderminster Harriers  (0-5 vs Swansea City)
1990: winners:   Hereford United         (2-1 vs Wrexham)
1992: finalists: Hednesford Town         (0-1 vs Cardiff City)

Scotland

English clubs in the Scottish football structure

Berwick Rangers played in English leagues until 1905, when they entered the East of Scotland League. They were elected to the Scottish league in 1951, and played 22 seasons at its second level, from 1955/56 to 1974/75 and from 1979/80 to 1980/81. Their best final placing at that level was sixth, in 1973/74. They twice reached the quarterfinals of the Scottish FA Cup.

Cup

1952: 1/8 final: Berwick Rangers         (0-1 vs Dundee)
1954: quarterf.: Berwick Rangers         (0-4 vs Rangers)
1967: 1/8 final: Berwick Rangers         (0-1 vs Hibernian)
1979: 1/8 final: Berwick Rangers         (0-3 vs Celtic)
1980: quarterf.: Berwick Rangers         (0-0, 0-1 vs Hibernian)
2000: 1/8 final: Berwick Rangers         (0-0, 0-3 vs Falkirk)

(All) Ireland

England | Scotland

Before and just after the turn of the nineteenth to the twentieth century, army regiments originally from England or Scotland but stationed in Ireland participated in the league and cup competities of the Irish FA, then responsible for the entire island.

English clubs in the Irish football structure

Two English army regiments entered the Irish league, Lancashire Fusiliers and North Staffordshire Regiment; another, Sherwood Foresters, never entered the league but reached the cup final (as they were based in Kildare, now in the Republic of Ireland, they are also mentioned in the section on Irish Republic clubs in the all-Irish football structure).

Championship

North Staffordshire Regiment (3 top level seasons)
1896/97  5.North Staffordshire R.  10  2  4  4  17-23   8
1897/98  6.North Staffordshire R.  10  2  1  7  13-31   5
1898/99  6.North Staffordshire R.  10  0  0 10  11-32   0

Lancashire Fusiliers (1 top level season)
1891/92  3.Lancashire Fusiliers    15 11  1  3  56-29  23

Cup

1897: finalists: Sherwood Foresters      (1-3 vs Cliftonville)

Scottish clubs in the Irish football structure

Two Scottish army regiments entered the Irish league, Royal Scots Regiment and King's Own Scottish Borderers; two others, Gordon Highlanders and The Black Watch, never entered the league but reached the cup final (and in the case of Gordon Highlanders even won it); The Black Watch were based in Limerick, now in the Republic of Ireland, they are also mentioned in the section on Irish Republic clubs in the all-Irish football structure).

Championship

Royal Scots Regiment (1 top level season)
1899/00  5.Royal Scots Regiment     7  2  1  4  10-17   5

King's Own Scottish Borderers (1 top level season)
1903/04  8.King's Own Scottish B.  14  1  1 12  11-61   3

Cup

1890: winners:   Gordon Highlanders      (2-2, 3-1 vs Cliftonville)   
1892: finalists: Black Watch Regiment    (0-7 vs Linfield)
1900: semifinal: King's Own Scottish B.  (scratched vs Cliftonville)

(Republic of) Ireland

Northern Irish clubs in the Irish football structure

When the FA of Ireland seceded from the Irish FA, one Belfast junior league, the Belfast's Falls League (based on the Falls Road, the city's Republican epicentre), affiliated to them. One of its clubs, Alton United, won the second edition of the FAI Cup, in 1922/23; in the previous season, another Belfast club, West Ham, had entered the same tournament but lost in the first round to Shelbourne (the tournament had only 11 participants and as Shelbourne had a bye in the second round, West Ham can be considered to have been 1921/22 quarterfinalists). No Belfast clubs entered the tournament after 1923. It is unknown what happened to either the Belfast's Falls League or the two clubs; presumably they still exist in (Northern) Irish junior football.

Derry City played at the Northern Irish top level without interruption from the 1929/30 season until 1971/72, winning the league in 1964/65, the cup in 1949, 1954 and 1964, and the Gold cup in 1965. They were forced to leave the league in November 1972, after various clubs had refused to play in Londonderry (the official, 'British' and 'protestant' name of the city of Derry, as it is known to the catholics and in the Republic of Ireland). They were elected (together with 5 other clubs: Bray Wanderers, Cobh Ramblers, EMFA (later renamed Kilkenny City), Monaghan United and Newcastle United (later renamed Newcastlewest)) to the newly formed second division of the league in Ireland in 1985, earned promotion to the Irish top flight in their second season, and did not fall outside the top-10 of the Republic until the end of the 2009 season, when they suffered their first ever relegation for holding unofficial contracts with players; they returned at the first time of asking by winning the 2010 championship at the second level. In their quarter of a century in the Republic's league structure they won 2 league championships, 5 cups and a record 10 league cups.

Championship

Derry City (26 top level seasons)
1987/88  8.Derry City              33 13  5 15  59-44  31
1988/89  1.Derry City              33 24  5  4  70-21  53
1989/90  2.Derry City              33 20  9  4  72-18  49
1990/91  7.Derry City              33 13  9 11  51-28  35
1991/92  2.Derry City              33 17 10  6  49-21  44
1992/93  5.Derry City              32 11 15  6  26-23  37
1993/94  4.Derry City              32 12 10 10  37-35  46
1994/95  2.Derry City              33 16 10  7  45-30  58
1995/96  6.Derry City              33 11 13  9  50-38  46
1996/97  1.Derry City              33 19 10  4  58-27  67
1997/98  9.Derry City              33 10 10 13  30-31  40
1998/99  5.Derry City              33 12  9 12  34-32  45
1999/00  7.Derry City              33 12 10 11  32-38  46
2000/01  6.Derry City              33 12  9 12  31-28  45
2001/02  5.Derry City              33 14  9 10  42-30  51
2002/03  8.Derry City              27  8  7 12  31-37  31
2003     9.Derry City              36  7 15 14  33-51  36 
2004     7.Derry City		   36 11 11 14  23-32  44
2005     2.Derry City              33 22  6  5  56-25  72
2006     2.Derry City              30 18  8  4  46-20  62 
2007     7.Derry City              33  8 13 12  30-31  37
2008     3.Derry City              33 16 10  7  46-25  58
2009     4.Derry City              36 18  5 13  49-31  59
         NB: Derry City finished fourth but were demoted to the second
             level for holding unofficial contracts with players.
2011     3.Derry City              36 18 14  4  63-23  68
2012     5.Derry City              30 11  6 13  36-36  39
2013     4.Derry City              33 17  5 11  57-39  56

Cup

1923: winners:   Alton United            (1-0 vs Shelbourne)
1988: finalists: Derry City              (0-1 vs Dundalk)
1989: winners:   Derry City              (0-0, 1-0 vs Cork City)
1994: finalists: Derry City              (0-1 vs Sligo Rovers)
1995: winners:   Derry City              (2-1 vs Shelbourne)
1997: finalists: Derry City              (0-2 vs Shelbourne)
2003: winners:   Derry City              (1-0 vs Shamrock Rovers) [1st final 2003]
2006: winners:   Derry City              (4-3 aet vs Saint Patrick's Athletic)
2008: finalists: Derry City              (2-2 aet, 2-4 pen vs Bohemians)
2012: winners:   Derry City              (3-2 aet vs Saint Patrick's Athletic)

League Cup

1989: winners:   Derry City              (4-0 vs Dundalk)
1990: finalists: Derry City              (1-1, 1-4 pen vs Dundalk)
1991: winners:   Derry City              (2-0 vs Limerick City)
1992: winners:   Derry City              (1-0 vs Bohemians)
1994: winners:   Derry City              (3-1 (agg) vs Shelbourne)
2000: winners:   Derry City              (3-1, 2-1 vs Athlone Town)
2002: finalists: Derry City              (1-2, 1-0 aet, 2-3 pen vs Limerick)
2005: winners:   Derry City              (2-1 vs UCD)
2006: winners:   Derry City              (0-0 aet, 3-0 pen vs Shelbourne)
2007: winners:   Derry City              (1-0 aet vs Bohemians)
2008: winners:   Derry City              (6-1 vs Wexford Youths)
2011: winners:   Derry City              (1-0 vs Cork City)

Greece

For seven seasons, while Greece were ruled by a military junta, the Cypriot league champions were admitted to the Greek first division in the next season. They always finished on one of the relegation spots, usually bottom, with the exception of APÓEL, who commendably placed 13th (of 18) in 1973/74. However, that was the last season a Cypriot club entered the Greek league, as 1974 saw both the Turkish invasion of the island and the return of democracy in Greece itself.

Cypriot clubs in the Greek football structure
Championship

1967/68 17.Olympiakós (Lefkosía)   34  6 11 17  39-76  57
1968/69 18.AÉL (Lemesós)           34  2  1 31  20-125 39
1969/70 17.Olympiakós (Lefkosía)   34  3  3 28  20-101 43
1970/71 18.ÉPA (Lárnaka)           34  3  4 27  23-76  43  [-1]
1971/72 18.Olympiakós (Lefkosía)   34  2  7 25  14-63  44  [-1]
1972/73 18.Omónoia (Lefkosía)      34  1  7 26  22-71  42  [-1]
1973/74 13.APÓEL (Lefkosía)        34 11  5 18  39-48  27
playoff 13-15
        13.APÓEL (Lefkosía)         2  1  0  1   6- 3   2

NB: APÓEL = Athlitikós Podosfairikós Ómilos Ellínon Lefkosías 

Turkey

After the Greco-Turkish war between 1919 and 1922, the Treaty of Lausanne signed in 1923 regulated the 'exchange of populations' between Greece and Turkey, which involved the expulsion of more than a million Greeks (c.q. christian populations, in particular Greek orthodox) from Minor Asia (in particular from Ionia (the region around Smýrna/İzmir), Pontus (around Trapezoúnta/Trabzon and Sampsoúnta/Samsun), Bithynia (Nikomédia/İzmit, Kalchedón/Kadıköy) and Proúsa (Bursa)) and Eastern Thrace (which lies in Europe, main city Adrianoúpolis/Edirne), and from about half a million Turks (c.q. muslims) from Greece. Prior to the treaty, many people had already fled as the military exchanges had come too close to their homes.

Greek clubs in the Turkish football structure

As part of this tragedy, various football clubs founded by the Greek communities in current Turkey moved across the Aegean: GS Apóllon Smýrni (from Smyrna) was re-established in 1922 as GS Apóllon Athína in Athens (the club was officially renamed GS Apóllon Smýrni in 2001), and Paniónios from Smyrna (founded 1890 as Orfeas Smýrni, renamed Paniónios in 1898) 'transferred' to Athens in 1922 under the name Paniónios GS Smýrnis-Athínas (re-established as Néos Paniónios in 2003, only to return to their former name in 2006). (Similar club moves occurred at the end of the Second World War from Viipuri/Vyborg in Karelia to Helsinki and Lahti in Finland and between the Turkish and Greek dominated parts of Cyprus in the seventies.) In later years, many Greeks from Konstantinoúpolis/İstanbul, who had not been expelled as part of the 1923 treaty, moved to Athens or Thessaloníki; because of this, Athlitikí Énosis Konstantinoupóleos (AÉK) were established in Athens in 1924, and Panthessaloníkios Athlitikós Ómilos Konstantinoupolitón (PAÓK) in Thessaloníki in 1926; both claim the heritage of nineteenth century clubs from the Péra district (now called Beyoğlu) in Constantinople, but their 'continued' history is less evident than that of the two Smyrna clubs Apóllon and Paniónios. As prior to 1923 only city competitions were organised in current Turkey (with Constantinople and Smyrna boasting the strongest clubs), no data are available on the performances of Apóllon and Paniónios prior to their (re-)foundation in 1922. In Greece, neither has ever won the championship, but Paniónios claimed the domestic cup in 1979 and 1998 (as well as losing four cup finals), while Apóllon reached the cup final once, in 1996, only to suffer a record 1-7 defeat to AÉK.

Austria

Hungary | Liechtenstein

Hungarian clubs in the Austrian football structure

A number of Hungarian clubs entered the Challenge Cup, held from 1897 to 1911, a competition open to all clubs from the Habsburg Empire but with origin and centre in Vienna.

Note that information on performances of non-Hungarian clubs in the Hungarian football structure during the Austro-Hungarian Habsburg Empire can be found in the section on Moving Countries - Hungary.

Challenge Cup

1902: finalists: Budapesti TC            (1-2 vs Vienna Cricket FC)
1902: semifinal: Ferencvárosi TC         (1-5 vs Budapesti TC)
1903: semifinal: Ferencvárosi TC         (1-5 vs Wiener AC)
1905: finalists: Magyar AC               (1-2 vs Wiener SV)
1909: winners:   Ferencvárosi TC         (2-1 vs Wiener Sport-Club)
1911: finalists: Ferencvárosi TC         (0-3 vs Wiener Sport-Club)
Liechtenstein clubs in the Austrian football structure

In its first season of existence, FC Vaduz, founded in December 1931, joined the Vorarlberger Fußballverband, the regional football federation of Vorarlberg in the extreme west of Austria. No results are known, they presumably played at the lowest (second?) regional level. After one season, FC Vaduz moved west to join the Swiss FA.

Switzerland

Germany | Liechtenstein

German clubs in the Swiss football structure

Büsingen am Hochrhein is a German exclave in Switzerland. Its football club, FC Büsingen, was founded in 1924 and plays in the Swiss league structure (Fussballverband Region Zürich). The highest level they ever reached was the fourth Swiss level in 1973/74, after gaining promotion from the 3. Liga (then the fifth level) to the 2. Liga (then the fourth level, below the Nationalliga A, the Nationalliga B (both nationwide) and the 1. Liga (organised in 3 regional groups)) at the end of the 1972/73 season. They finished bottom in their first and last ever season at the fourth level and never returned, currently (2008/09) playing in the 4. Liga, nowadays the seventh level in the Swiss league structure.

2. Liga (Region Zürich)

FC Büsingen (1 season)
1973/74 11.FC Büsingen             20  3  4 13  23-55  10
Liechtenstein clubs in the Swiss football structure

As Liechtenstein does not have its own league, all its (currently seven) clubs play in the Swiss league structure (only FC Vaduz played one season in a regional league in Austria). Until 2007, none ever reached the Swiss top flight, but FC Vaduz were a fixture in the Swiss second level since earning promotion in 2001, reaching the 8-team promotion/relegation group in 2002/03 (in which they finished 4th, traditionally the last promotion spot but not in that season as the top flight was reduced from 12 to 10 clubs) and the promotion/relegation playoff in 2003/04 and 2004/05. In 2007/08 they finally managed to obtain promotion to the Swiss top flight; their adventure only lasted one season; they will get another try in 2014/15. Also in 2007/08, a second Liechtenstein club, USV Eschen/Mauren, obtained promotion to the third Swiss level, the 1. Liga. Their lack of success in the Swiss Cup is due to the fact that Liechtenstein clubs do not enter it.

As Liechtenstein cup winners, FC Vaduz played FC Basel in the UEFA Cup 2006/07, in the second qualifying round, and lost on the away goal rule following a 0-1 loss away and a 2-1 win at home.

Nationalliga A/Super  League

FC Vaduz (2 seasons)
2008/09 10.FC Vaduz                36  5  7 24  28-85  22
2014/15 season running

Nationalliga B/Challenge League

FC Vaduz (11 seasons)
2001/02 11.FC Vaduz                22  5  7 10  34-43  22  [fall]
         2.FC Vaduz                14  8  3  3  28-18  38  [relegation playoff]
        NB: included halved points of fall season as bonus
2002/03  1.FC Vaduz                22 12  5  5  47-32  41  [fall]
         4.FC Vaduz                12  3  4  5  17-23  13  [promotion playoff]
2003/04  2.FC Vaduz                32 16  9  7  56-34  79  [22] 
        NB: clubs obtained bonus points for winning head-to-heads;
            FC Vaduz lost promotion/relegation playoff 0-2, 2-1 vs
            Neuchâtel Xamax
2004/05  2.FC Vaduz                34 21  6  7  58-28  69 
        NB: FC Vaduz lost promotion/relegation playoff 0-1, 1-1 vs
            FC Schaffhausen
2005/06  8.FC Vaduz                34 13  7 14  57-54  46
2006/07  9.FC Vaduz                34 12 10 12  57-52  46
2007/08  1.FC Vaduz                34 21  7  6  75-40  70
2009/10  8.FC Vaduz                30 11  8 11  44-43  41
2010/11  4.FC Vaduz                30 19  3  8  59-41  60
2011/12  8.FC Vaduz                30 13  6 11  54-45  45
2012/13  9.FC Vaduz                36 10  7 19  41-52  37
2013/14  1.FC Vaduz                36 21 10  5  71-34  73

Cup

Liechtenstein clubs do not enter the Swiss Cup.

Spain

A club from Andorra has played at the third Spanish level, and once came close to promotion to the second.

Andorran clubs in the Spanish football structure

Andorra started its own national league in the nineties and meanwhile qualify clubs for the UEFA club competitions, but one club from the principality has been entering the Spanish league structure for a long time. FC Andorra played at the third Spanish level, the Segunda División B (a level first organised in 1977; before the third level was played in many regional groups), for many seasons in the eighties and nineties, first entering this division in 1980/81.
In 1988/89, FC Andorra finished second in their group behind Palamós, missing out on promotion to the second level by 5 points. Below we list their best (top-10) third level finishes. They were relegated from the Segunda División B in 1997/98 and have meanwhile dropped to the seventh level Primera Territorial Catalana (the third Catalan level, below the four national levels).
Note that Club Andorra (formerly Endesa Andorra), who also played several seasons in the Segunda División B, are from a village (also called Andorra) in the province of Teruel, and not from the principality.

Segunda División B

FC Andorra
Top-10 finishes (in 17 seasons)
1981/82  8.FC Andorra              38 16  9 13  56-44  41  [Grupo II]
1982/83  8.FC Andorra              38 15  9 14  43-47  39  [Grupo I]
1983/84 10.FC Andorra              38 14 13 11  52-44  41  [Grupo I]
1984/85  9.FC Andorra              38 13 12 13  51-57  38  [Grupo I]
1988/89  2.FC Andorra              38 23  8  7  58-28  54  [Grupo II]
1989/90  4.FC Andorra              38 18 10 10  57-43  46  [Grupo II]
1990/91  7.FC Andorra              38 15 10 13  41-34  40  [Grupo II]
1991/92  6.FC Andorra              38 14 16  8  64-46  44  [Grupo II]
1992/93 10.FC Andorra              38 13 11 14  47-41  37  [Grupo II]
1994/95  7.FC Andorra              38 13 16  9  32-31  42  [Grupo III]
1995/96  9.FC Andorra              38 14  9 15  38-44  51  [Grupo III]
1996/97  6.FC Andorra              38 15 13 10  42-33  58  [Grupo III]

Cup

1981: 1/18 fin.: FC Andorra              (0-0, 0-4 vs Castellón)
NB: after this round (tercera eliminatoria), 19 clubs were left:
    Real Madrid who had received a bye to the 1/8 finals as holders
    and the 18 winners of the tercera eliminatoria, of which 6 
    (including Castellón) had to contest the cuarta eliminatoria
    for 3 places in the 1/8 finals.

Italy

San Marino | Switzerland

San Marino has its own championship since 1985, but a club from the republic has entered the Italian league system for a much longer time.

San Marino clubs in the Italian football structure

The clubs from San Marino joined the Italian federation in 1959. After an initial entry (in 1959/60) at the lowest level by a joint team of the two strongest local clubs, Libertas and Tre Penne, a special 'national' club, SS Serenissima, was formed in 1960. The club apparently played at the fourth national level for three seasons. In 1973, after being relegated to the promozione, Serenissima merged with another San Marino club, Juvenes, which also had started playing in the Italian league structure, to form AC San Marino, later renamed San Marino Calcio.
San Marino Calcio first entered the fourth level Serie C2 in 1988/89. They only lasted one season then before returning to the Interregionale, and even went down to the sixth level Eccellenza for two seasons (1992/93 and 1996/97) before returning to the professional ranks in 2000. In 2004/05 they finished 4th in the Girone B of the Serie C2 (as in the previous season), and in spite of being defeated in the promotion playoffs by Cisco Lodigiani gained entry to the Serie C1, thanks to administrative decisions. In their first ever season at the Italian third level, they finished 16th from 18 in the Girone A but survived the chop in the playoffs, beating Pro Sesto 1-0 over 2 legs. They were not so lucky in their second season, losing 1-3 on aggregate to Martina and dropping down to the fourth level for 2007/08.

After merging with Serenissima into AC San Marino, Juvenes remained as a club in the San Marino football structure, and started to enter the Italian league structure again in 1996/97. After a merger with Dogana in 2000, they played as Juvenes/Dogana at the Prima Categoria level of the Italian league structure (and simultaneously in that of San Marino) until the end of the 2006/07 season, after which the club decided to play in San Marino only.

Serie C1
2005/06 16.San Marino Calcio       34  8 11 15  32-38  35  [Girone A]
2006/07 17.San Marino Calcio       34  8  8 18  37-43  32  [Girone B]
Swiss clubs in the Italian football structure

Between 1914 and 1922, FC Chiasso opted to enter the league structure of the Italian FA (FIGC), because of the lack of competitions in Ticino, the Swiss canton in which the border town of Chiasso is located. They played in the first stages of the northern Italian group in 1914/15 and of the Lombardian groups from 1919 to 1922, never reaching the second stage (in 1921/22, they finished only 1 point behind group winners Como, but that was after many of the stronger clubs had left for the dissident CGI league). After returning to the Swiss football structure, they first reached the Swiss top level in 1927. They have never won the Swiss championship or reached the Swiss cup final.

Northern Italy
1914/15  5.Chiasso                 10  2  3  5  24-37   7  [group D]
Lombardy
1919/20  4.Chiasso                 10  3  2  5  15-18   8  [group B]
1920/21  3.Chiasso                  6  1  1  4   6-14   3  [group D]
1921/22  2.Chiasso                  6  2  4  0  11- 5   8  [group A]

France

Monaco | Saar | Spain

AS Monaco

Monaco has its own competition for company representations, but its most famous football club is of course AS Monaco, first promoted to the French top level in 1953. They have since won 7 league championships, including one as newly promoted club in 1978. In addition, they claimed 5 cups and 2 league cups. They suffered relegation from the Ligue 1 in 2011.
Prior to the foundation of AS Monaco in 1924, local side Herculis entered the French Cup in 1917/18, losing 1-7 away to Olympique de Marseille in their first match. Herculis were renamed Monaco Sport in 1923, and as such were one of the merger clubs to form AS Monaco one year later.

Championship

AS Monaco (54 top level seasons)
top-3 finishes
1955/56  3.AS Monaco               34 17  7 10  63-45  41
1960/61  1.AS Monaco               38 26  5  7  77-42  57
1962/63  1.AS Monaco               38 20 10  8  77-44  50
1963/64  2.AS Monaco               34 17  7 10  62-45  41
1977/78  1.AS Monaco               38 22  9  7  79-46  53
1981/82  1.AS Monaco               38 24  7  7  70-29  55
1983/84  2.AS Monaco               38 22 10  6  58-29  54
1984/85  3.AS Monaco               38 18 12  8  65-28  48
1987/88  1.AS Monaco               38 20 12  6  53-29  52
1988/89  3.AS Monaco               38 18 14  6  62-38  68
1989/90  3.AS Monaco               38 15 16  7  38-24  46
1990/91  2.AS Monaco               38 20 11  7  51-30  51
1991/92  2.AS Monaco               38 22  8  8  55-33  52
1992/93  3.AS Monaco               38 21  9  8  56-29  51
1995/96  3.AS Monaco               38 19 11  8  64-39  68
1996/97  1.AS Monaco               38 23 10  5  69-30  79
1997/98  3.AS Monaco               34 18  5 11  51-33  59
1999/00  1.AS Monaco               34 20  5  9  69-38  65
2002/03  2.AS Monaco               38 19 10  9  66-33  67
2003/04  3.AS Monaco               38 21 12  5  59-30  75
2004/05  3.AS Monaco               38 15 18  5  52-35  63
2013/14  2.AS Monaco               38 23 11  4  63-31  80

Cup

1960: winners:   AS Monaco               (4-2 aet vs AS Saint-Etienne)
1963: winners:   AS Monaco               (0-0 aet, 2-0 vs Olympique Lyonnais)
1974: finalists: AS Monaco               (1-2 vs AS Saint-Etienne)
1980: winners:   AS Monaco               (3-1 vs US Orléans)
1984: finalists: AS Monaco               (0-2 aet vs FC Metz)
1985: winners:   AS Monaco               (1-0 vs Paris Saint-Germain FC)
1989: finalists: AS Monaco               (3-4 vs Olympique Marseille)
1991: winners:   AS Monaco               (1-0 vs Olympique Marseille)
1992: finalists: AS Monaco               (final cancelled)
         NB: the 1992 cup final was not played due to the tragedy in the other
             semifinal between Bastia and Olympique Marseille, when a temporary
             stand at Bastia's stadium collapsed prior to the match, killing 19
             people; Monaco entered the 1992/93 Cup Winners' Cup but the 1991/92
             Coupe de France was not awarded.
2010: finalists: AS Monaco               (0-1 aet vs vs Paris Saint-Germain FC)

League Cup

Coupe Charles Drago
1961: winners:   AS Monaco               (2-1 vs RC Strasbourg)
Coupe de la Ligue
1984: finalists: AS Monaco               (1-3 vs Stade Lavallois)
2001: finalists: AS Monaco               (1-2 aet vs Olympique Lyonnais)
2003: winners:   AS Monaco               (4-1 vs FC Sochaux-Montbéliard)
1.FC Saarbrücken

Unwilling to enter the weak league of the Saar, 1.FC Saarbrücken played hors concours in the second division of the French league during the 1948/49 season, registering 26 wins, 7 draws and 5 losses in their 38 encounters, a record which would have given them first place in the division had their matches counted, way ahead of champions RC Lens whom they beat home and away. Their request for regular participation in 1949/50 was denied, and they later returned to the (West) German league structure, reaching the West German championship final in their first season back (1951/52) when the Saar was still an independent entity.

Spain

Union Esportiva Bossòst (U.E.B., also known as Unión Deportiva Bossost in Spanish and Union Sportive de Bossost in French) are a club from a Spanish valley in the Pyrenees, the Valle d'Arán (Vall d'Aran in Catalan, Val d'Aran in French). Since the mid-twentieth century they play in a French district league, the district Haute-Garonne Comminges, part of the Ligue Midi-Pyrenées de Football, in contrast to the other two clubs in the valley, Les and Vielha, which enter the Spanish league structure. UE Bossòst won the district cup tournament in 1982 and 1993 and the third division in 1982; currently (2012/13) they play at the highest district level, the Championnat Excellence (corresponding to the tenth level in the French league pyramid).

Germany

Austria | Czech Republic

SV Kleinwalsertal

The Kleinwalsertal is a region in Vorarlberg, Austria, which cannot be reached by road from the remainder of Vorarlberg (or Austria), but only through Germany (Oberstdorf, Bavaria). The Skiclub Kleinwalsertal founded a football section in 1958, which made itself independent in 1960 and registered with the BFV (Bayerischer Fußball-Verband) in Bavaria, Germany in order to enter the league competition there. In 1975 this club merged into the SV Kleinwalsertal, which still is playing football in Bavaria, although apparently only at youth level. The club never played in the Austrian league structure.

DFC Prag

In its early years, the German football federation DFB considered itself the representative of German football players rather than football players in Germany. Therefore, the football club for German players in Prague, the DFC Prag, which geographically fell under the jurisdiction of the Austrian FA, entered the first ever German championship in 1903, as representatives of the Verband der Prager deutschen Fußball-Vereine. Their participation already was contentious, as they had not entered the 1903 VPdV championship (but had won the 1902 edition). The 1903 league had finished with a 3-way tie at the top, and rather than resolving that, it was decided to register DFC Prag for the German championship playoff. For this, five other teams had qualified, and DFC Prag were to play the champions of Southern Germany, Karlsruher FV, in the first round in Munich (München). After the KFV had already organised a ground in the Bavarian capital and taken care of all financial issues, the DFB granted a request by the Prague club to host the match. The KFV of course protested, and eventually the DFB handed both clubs a bye and refixtured the tie for the semifinals, in Leipzig. But shortly before their departure, the Karlsruhe club received an anonymous telegram (sent from Prague) stating that the match had been cancelled again. They decided not to make the long trip, and DFC Prag were awarded a walkover. The German championship final was therefore the first official match DFC Prag played that season!
After the DFB joined FIFA, its 'territory' was restricted to that of contemporary Germany, and the Prague club did not enter the German football structure again. They were successful in their own country though: they had already won a championship in Bohemia (Mistrovství Čech) in fall 1896 and collected another (Mistrovtsví ČSF) in 1917. They entered the first ever 'national' league (Asociační Liga) of Czechoslovakia, in spring 1925, but withdrew after finishing that first season in fourth position, and won Czechoslovak amateur championships in 1930/31 and 1932/33 before joining the newly introduced Státní Liga in 1934/35, finishing 7th (from 12) in that first season and 11th (from 14) in the next. Other 'German' clubs active in that league in its early years included Teplitzer FK and DSV Saaz (from the town called Žatec in Czech).

Championship

1903: finalists: DFC Prag                (2-7 vs VfB Leipzig)

Poland

Hungarian clubs in the Polish football structure

After the 1977 League Cup won by Odra Opole (who thereby earned entry to the 1977/78 UEFA Cup), the PZPN wanted to organise another edition in 1978; however, only 11 of the 16 top level clubs entered, and so four guest teams from Hungary were invited: Diósgyőri VTK, Tatabányai Bányász SC, Szegedi LC and Kaposvári Rákóczi FC. Further details about the performances of these four guests are not available; none reached the final, which was won by Górnik Zabrze, who suffered relegation from the top flight in the same season.

Slovenia

Croatian clubs in the Slovenian football structure

During the thirties, when both Croatia and Slovenia were part of the Kingdom of Yugoslavia, ČŠK from Čakovec entered the Slovenian regional league. In 1937/38 they won the Ljubljanska podsavez and entered the promotion playoffs for entering the Yugoslav top level but were eliminated by Krajišnik (Banja Luka). During the second world war, the same club entered the Hungarian league structure.

Lithuania

Russian clubs in the Lithuanian football structure

For at least one season, a club from the Russian exclave Kaliningrad entered one of the three zones of the Lithuanian third division. They won their zone unbeaten but appear not to have entered again.

LFF Lyga 2

Volna Kaliningrad
2000     1.Volna Kaliningrad       22 20  2  0 101- 9  62  [western zone]

Latvia

Estonian clubs in the Latvian football structure

One of the third level zones in Latvia, the Ziemeļaustrumlatvia zone, accommodated four Estonian clubs during two seasons; their matches were not counted for the zone itself, but for an overall classification, the so-called Livonijas Liga, outside of the actual Latvian league structure. (The head-to-head matches of the Latvian clubs counted for the Ziemeļaustrumlatvia zone.) The Estonian clubs were not very successful.

Livonijas Liga

FC Võru
2004     5.FC Võru                 14  7  1  6  30-33  28
2005     3.FC Võru                  3  2  0  1   5- 3   6  [group 1]

Tammeka Tartu
2004     4.Tammeka Tartu           14  7  1  6  43-32  28
2005     4.Tammeka Tartu            3  1  0  2   3-13   3  [group 2]

Warrior Valga
2004     6.Warrior Valga           14  5  0  9  26-45  24 
2005     3.Warrior Valga            3  1  0  2   6- 6   3  [group 2]

Lootus Pilva
2004     8.Lootus Pilva            14  2  1 11  19-49  19
2005     4.Lootus Pilva             3  0  0  3   1- 7   0  [group 1]

Finland

Russian clubs in the Finnish football structure

In the late nineties, (at least) two Russian clubs from towns which had belonged to Finland before the second World War, FK Sortavala and Metallurg Värtsilä, played in the Finnish league structure as guests. FK Sortavala stayed in the Finnish league structure for four seasons from 1995 to 1998, winning promotion in their inaugural season in the Nelonen (fifth level) and continuing for three years in the Kolmonen (fourth level) before withdrawing. Metallurg Värtsilä started in the Nelonen in 1997, won promotion, were relegated in 1998 playing in the Kolmonen, won promotion back again in 1999 and played their last season 2000 in the Kolmonen before withdrawing as well. (Neither FK Sortavala 1998 nor Metallurg Värtsilä 2000 finished on a relegation place.)

City name correspondences: 
Finnish          Russian
Sortavala        Sortavala
Värtsilä         Vyartsilya
NB: Sortavala earlier also known as Serdobol

Sweden

Finnish clubs in the Swedish football structure

At least four clubs from the Åland Islands, which form an autonomous region within Finland although Swedish is the official language on the archipelago, have played in the Swedish league structure since the early 1990s. IF Fram from Saltvik (who had reached the fourth round of the Finnish Cup in 1979) and Östernäs from Mariehamn (who had reached the third round of the Finnish Cup in 1981) both played in the Division 6 (the 8th Swedish league level) in 2006, while Eckerö IK were in Division 7 (the 9th Swedish league level). Jomala IK (who had reached the third round of the Finnish Cup in 1983) played at the same level in the past (at least in the 2001 season) but meanwhile returned to the Finnish league structure. Further details (e.g. the highest Swedish league level ever reached by an Åland club) are not available.
Another Åland club, IFK Mariehamn from the main town on the islands, reached the top Finnish level (Veikkausliiga) for the first time ever in 2005 and finished their second season (2006) there in fifth place; in 2009 they managed their best ever league finish so far with fourth place. They also reached the 1/8 finals of the Finnish Cup 2006, improving this in 2010 when losing to HJK in the semifinals, a stage they had already reached in the Liigacup in 2009. The club's women football team play in Sweden, in the Upplandsseriens Division 4 (at the 5th level).

City name correspondence: 
Swedish          Finnish
Mariehamn        Maarianhamina

Thailand

Laotian clubs in the Thai football structure

In the 2009 season, Mukdahan-Savannakhet FC entered the northeastern section of the Thai Division 2 (third level); they were reportedly planning to play home matches in Laos, in the town of Kaysone Phomvihane (formerly known as Savannakhet and Khanthabouli, and the capital of the Laotian province Savannakhet), which is connected to the Thai town of Mukdahan by the Second Thai-Lao Friendship Bridge, crossing the Mekong river, opened in 2007. However, it appears that eventually they played all home matches in Mukdahan.

Malaysia

Brunei | Cambodia | Myanmar | Singapore

Representative teams from Brunei traditionally enter the Malaysian football competition; until 2005, this was a privilege of a Brunei FA representative team, which won the cup in 1999; since the 2005/06 season, the club team DPMM FC (Duli Pengiran Muda Mahkota; then reigning champions of the sultanate - they won 2 of the first 3 editions of the domestic B-League, in 2002 and 2004, and won the 2004 FA Cup) had the honour. This club earned promotion from the second level in their first season and finished third in their debut season in the top flight (Super League), after long challenging for the championship (fellow promoted club Kedah eventually won the title). The team have also entered the Singapore Cup on numerous occasions (in spite of being denied entrance in the Piala Malaysia, the main Malaysian cup tournament). DPMM did not enter the 2009 Malaysian Super League due to the suspension of the Brunei FA by the Home Ministry of the country. However, in spite of this problem, they managed to register for the Singapore S-League 2009. This was the third different top level competition of a FIFA member country in which DPMM participated (after Brunei and Malaysia), a world record.

Brunei clubs in the Malaysian football structure
Championship

Brunei FA
Top-5 finishes
1996     5.Brunei FA               28 12  8  8  38-32  44
1997     5.Brunei FA               28 13  6  9  52-39  45
1998     3.Brunei FA               22  9  8  5  44-33  35

DPMM FC (2 top level seasons)
2006/07  3.DPMM FC                 24 13  5  6  46-29  44
2007/08 10.DPMM FC                 24  4 10 10  27-34  22

Cup

1983: quarterf.: Brunei FA               (1-1, 1-4 vs Selangor FA)
1997: semifinal: Brunei FA               (2-3, 1-3 vs Pahang FA)
1999: winners:   Brunei FA               (2-1 vs Sarawak FA)
Cambodian clubs in the Malaysian football structure

In 2012 and 2013 Preah Khan Reach entered the Piala FA, the second most important cup competition in Malaysia (behind the Piala Malaysia). In both seasons they were eliminated by a local third level club.

Piala FA

2012: 1/8 final: Preah Khan Reach        (0-1 vs SPA FC)
2013: 1/16 fin.: Preah Khan Reach        (1-6 vs PBAPP FC)
Myanmar clubs in the Malaysian football structure

In 1935, a British army team based in Taiping (Perak State) but created in Mandalay (Burma) entered the northern section of the Malaya Cup tournament.

Cup

2nd Battalion, The 20th Burma Rifles (1 season)
1935     5.2/20 Burma Rifles        4  0  1  3   8-19   1  [northern section]
Singapore clubs in the Malaysian football structure

For the achievements of the Singapore FA selection in Malaysia until 1995, see the section on country splits and unifications; below only the participation of Singapore sides in the Malaysian football structure after the forced exclusion of the Singapore FA in 1995 is discussed, starting with Lions XII FC, a Singapore youth selection which first entered the Malaysian Super League in 2012, finishing runners-up in their first season and winning the league in 2013.

Championship

Lions XII (Singapore) (3 seasons)
2012     2.Lions XII                      26 15  5  6  48-23  50
2013     1.Lions XII                      22 12  7  3  32-15  43 
2014     8.Lions XII                      22  8  4 10  26-27  28

Cup

2012: semifinal: Lions XII               (1-1, 1-1 aet, 4-5 pen vs ATM)
2013: quarterf.: Lions XII               (1-0, 1-4 vs ATM)

Singapore

Australia | China, France, Japan, South Korea, Africa | Brunei | Cambodia | Hongkong | Indonesia | Laos | Malaysia | Myanmar | Philippines | Thailand

Various foreign and pseudo-foreign teams have entered the Singapore league, with two Australian clubs claiming the top-2 spots in 1994, Perth Kangaroos winning the league ahead of Darwin Cubs. The professional S-League, which exists since 1997, has seen 'Chinese', 'Japanese', 'French', 'Korean' and 'African' clubs enter the league (all being based in Singapore but consisting of players from the relevant country or continent only), and Thai guest teams reached its cup final on three occasions, winning in 2010. Teams from Australia, Brunei, Cambodia, Hongkong, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar and the Philippines also played in the Singapore cup tournament in recent seasons.

Australian clubs in the Singapore football structure
Championship

1994     1.Perth Kangaroos         18 17  1  0  75- 8  35
         2.Darwin Cubs             18 13  2  3  56-14  28

1995     -.Darwin Cubs             withdrew before end season

Cup

2010: quarterf.: South Melbourne         (1-3, 3-3 vs Bangkok Glass)
2011: quarterf.: South Melbourne         (0-3 vs Albirex Niigata (S))
'Foreign' clubs in the Singapore football structure

Starting from the 2003 season, a number of 'foreign' clubs have entered the S-League of Singapore. These clubs are all based in Singapore, but are to use only players who are citizens from their 'own' country (in the short-lived case of Sporting Afrique, their 'own' continent).

Sinchi ('Singapore Chinese'), considered a team 'from China', were the first such club in 2003, entering the S-League for 3 seasons; Albirex Niigata (S), which acts as a farm team for Japanese side Albirex Niigata, entered (and finished mid-table) in each season since 2004 before enjoying a star season in 2011, finishing fourth in the league, reaching the cup final and winning the league cup (in the previous seven years, they had only managed one semi-final appearance in spite of entering eleven cup competitions in Singapore; since 2014 Albirex Niigata also enter a team in the league of Cambodia) and 'African' club Sporting Afrique, which consisted of players from Cameroon, Ghana, Kenya and Nigeria, played for one season in 2006. For the 2007 season Sporting Afrique were dropped while two new teams, Liaoning Guangyuan (a farm team for Liaoning FC) and Korean Super Reds (later renamed Super Reds) entered as additional 'foreign' participants. In 2008, Liaoning Guangyuan were replaced by Dalian Shide Siwu, a farm team for Dalian Shide. This club also lasted only one season before being replaced by Brunei DPMM, who entered for the first time in 2009 (see the corresponding section on Brunei, as DPMM were based in their own country, in contrast to the other 'foreign' clubs). DPMM were excluded a few weeks before the end of the 2009 season because of a FIFA ban on Brunei and were not considered for 2010. Super Reds were dropped in 2010, in spite of being the only 'foreign' team with an above average record on the field in the two previous seasons (apart from DPMM), even finishing runners-up in 2008, in favour of a new Chinese farm team, that of Beijing Guoan (which emulated Liaoning Guangyuan and Dalian Shide Siwu by finishing 10th in the league, failing to reach the quarterfinal stage of any cup tournament, and being dropped after one season), and a collection of French citizens called Etoile, who won both the league and the league cup in their debut season, narrowly losing out on a treble due to a semi-final defeat against Thai side Bangkok Glass in the cup tournament; Bangkok Glass went on to become the first foreign club to win the main cup tournament. In the 2012 season, Harimau Muda A became the first team from Malaysia (in fact, the national youth team) to enter the S-League (in return, Singapore youth side Lions XII entered the Malaysian Super League). At the same time, 2010 champions Etoile were dropped after only two seasons. In 2013 Harimau Muda A were replaced by Harimau Muda B (the U-19 side). Harimau Muda A instead joined the Queensland state league in Australia in 2014.

Championship

Albirex Niigata (S) (10 top level seasons)
2004     5.Albirex Niigata (S)     27 12  8  7  50-42  44
2005     5.Albirex Niigata (S)     27 12  8  7  50-33  44
2006     6.Albirex Niigata (S)     30 12  9  9  52-44  45
2007     8.Albirex Niigata (S)     33  9  8 16  45-49  35
2008     7.Albirex Niigata (S)     33 10 11 12  44-55  41
2009     7.Albirex Niigata (S)     30 11  5 14  38-47  38 
2010     7.Albirex Niigata (S)     33  9 10 14  31-42  37
2011     4.Albirex Niigata (S)     33 20  5  8  80-34  65
2012     3.Albirex Niigata (S)     24 12  7  5  37-26  43
2013     3.Albirex Niigata (S)     27 13  7  7  36-28  46

Sinchi (3 top level seasons)
2003     7.Sinchi                  33 11 11 11  46-48  50  [+6]
         NB: drawn matches were decided by penalties, with the
             shootout winners obtaining an extra point
2004     9.Sinchi TV               27  4  5 18  36-62  17
2005     9.Sinchi                  27  7  3 17  27-56  21  [-3]
         NB: Sinchi had 3 points deducted for gross misconduct

(Korean) Super Reds (3 top level seasons)
2007    12.Super Reds              33  3  9 21  24-80  18
2008     2.Super Reds              33 24  3  6  68-32  75
2009     5.Super Reds              30 14  8  8  52-34  50
         NB: club renamed Super Reds during 2007 season

Etoile (2 top level seasons)
2010     1.Etoile                  33 21  7  5  54-23  70 
2011     5.Etoile                  33 21  4  8  65-36  62  [-5]
         NB: Etoile had 5 points deducted	

Sporting Afrique (1 top level season)
2006     9.Sporting Afrique        30  5  9 16  36-58  24

Liaoning Guangyuan (1 top level season)
2007    10.Liaoning Guangyuan      33  8  5 20  33-63  29

Dalian Shide Siwu (1 top level season)
2008    10.Dalian Shide Siwu       33  5  7 21  26-75  22

Beijing Guoan Talent (1 top level season)
2010    10.Beijing Guoan Talent    33 10  6 17  30-49  31  [-5]
         NB: Beijing Guoan Talent had 5 points deducted for gross
             misconduct

Cup

2003: quarterf.: Sinchi                  (0-1 vs Woodlands Wellington)
2004: semifinal: Sinchi Golden-Throat    (1-5, 4-5 vs Home United)
      1/8 final: Albirex Niigata (S)     (3-4 vs Balestier Khalsa)
2005: quarterf.: Sinchi                  (1-3, 0-1 vs Home United
      quarterf.: Albirex Niigata (S)     (3-5, 2-1 vs Woodlands Wellington)
2006: quarterf.: Albirex Niigata (S)     (2-2, 1-2 vs Chonburi Province)
      1/8 final: Sporting Afrique        (2-3 aet vs Young Lions)
2007: 1/8 final: Albirex Niigata (S)     (0-1 vs Bangkok University)
      1/8 final: Liaoning Guangyuan      (3-4 vs Woodlands Wellington)
      1/8 final: Korean Super Reds       (0-2 vs Home United)
2008: quarterf.: Super Reds              (1-1, 0-3 vs Singapore Armed Forces)
      1/8 final: Albirex Niigata (S)     (1-4 vs Bangkok University)
      1/8 final: Dalian Shide Siwu       (1-5 vs Home United)
2009: semifinal: Albirex Niigata (S)     (0-1, 1-0 aet, 3-4 pen vs Geylang United)
      1/8 final: Super Reds              (2-4 vs TTM Samut Sakhon)
2010: semifinal: Etoile                  (1-1, 0-2 vs Bangkok Glass)
      quarterf.: Albirex Niigata (S)     (0-1, 0-0 vs Young Lions)
      1/8 final: Beijing Guoan           (1-2 vs Kitchee)
2011: finalists: Albirex Niigata (S)     (0-1 aet vs Home United)
      semifinal: Etoile                  (1-1, 0-1 vs Home United)
2012: quarterf.: Albirex Niigata (S)     (1-2, 0-2 vs Tampines Rovers)
2013: 1/8 final: Albirex Niigata (S)     (2-3 vs Home United)
2014: quarterf.: Albirex Niigata (S)     (3-4, 1-2 vs DPMM FC)

League Cup

2007: quarterf.: Albirex Niigata (S)     (1-2 vs Gombak United)
      quarterf.: Korean Super Reds       (0-2 vs Woodlands Wellington)
2008: finalists: Super Reds              (1-2 vs Gombak United)
      quarterf.: Albirex Niigata (S)     (0-3, 1-3 vs Super Reds)
      1/8 final: Dalian Shide Siwu       (0-1 vs Albirex Niigata (S))
2009: quarterf.: Super Reds              (0-0 aet, 3-4 pen vs Woodlands Wellington)
      1/8 final: Albirex Niigata (S)     (eliminated in group stage)
2010: winners:   Etoile                  (3-1 vs Woodlands Wellington) 
      1/8 final: Albirex Niigata (S)     (0-0 aet, 3-4 pen vs Woodlands Wellington)
      1/8 final: Beijing Guoan           (1-3 aet vs Sengkang Punggol)
2011: winners:   Albirex Niigata (S)     (0-0 aet, 5-4 pen vs Hougang United)
      quarterf.: Etoile                  (1-1 aet, 5-6 pen vs Home United)
2012: quarterf.: Albirex Niigata (S)     (3-3 aet, 4-5 pen vs Tampines Rovers)
2013: semifinal: Albirex Niigata (S)     (0-1 vs Balestier Khalsa)
2014: quarterf.: Albirex Niigata (S)     (1-3 vs Geylang International)
Brunei clubs in the Singapore football structure

Note that DPMM FC played in the Malaysian league structure from 2005/06 until 2008; due to administrative problems between the Brunei FA and the national sports ministry, they failed to register for the 2009 Malaysian Super League, but managed to enter the 2009 S-League instead. This was the third different top level competition of a FIFA member country in which DPMM participated (after Brunei and Malaysia), a world record. However, following the suspension of Brunei by FIFA at the end of September 2009, all their matches were annulled; at the time of suspension, DPMM had only 5 matches left and were on course for a finish between second and sixth place. However, they did manage to win the Singapore League Cup before being kicked out. DPMM returned to the Singapore league structure in 2012 and celebrated their return by winning the League Cup again, becoming the first club to win the trophy twice (in 2014, they extended that record by winning it for the third time). It also marked the fourth successive season that the tournament was won by a 'foreign' club (in between the two wins of DPMM, Etoile and Albirex Niigata (S) had claimed the trophy).

Championship

DPMM FC (3 top level seasons; first annulled)
2009     -.Brunei DPMM             28 14  8  6  43-35  50  [all matches annulled]
        NB: Brunei DPMM had 5 matches left to play when excluded
2012     2.Brunei DPMM             24 15  3  6  49-27  48
2013     8.Brunei DPMM             27  9  8 10  41-46  35

Cup

2004: 1/8 final: DPMM FC                 (1-2 vs Woodlands Wellington)
2005: 1/8 final: DPMM FC                 (0-2 vs Sinchi)
2006: 1/8 final: DPMM FC                 (0-1 vs Tampines Rovers)
2007: 1/8 final: DPMM FC                 (0-1 vs Tampines Rovers)
2008: 1/8 final: DPMM FC                 (0-1 vs Woodlands Wellington)
2009: quarterf.: DPMM FC                 (1-3, 2-4 vs TTM Samut Sakhon)
2012: 1/8 final: DPMM FC                 (0-1 vs Home United)
2013: quarterf.: DPMM FC                 (0-1, 4-4 vs Global FC)
2014: semifinal: DPMM FC                 (to play Home United)

League Cup
2009: winners:   DPMM FC                 (1-1 aet, 4-3 pen vs Singapore Armed Forces)
2012: winners:   DPMM FC                 (2-0 vs Geylang United)
2013: finalists: DPMM FC                 (0-4 vs Balestier Khalsa) 
2014: winners:   DPMM FC                 (2-0 vs Tanjong Pagar United)
Cambodian clubs in the Singapore football structure

Among all foreign entrants in the Singapore Cup tournament, Phnom Penh Crown (called Empire until 2008) are the most frequent guests. However, in seven seasons they have only once managed to win a tie, in 2009 against Young Lions, the Singapore youth side.

Cup

2006: 1/8 final: Khmer Empire Phnom Penh (1-8 vs Singapore Armed Forces)
2007: 1/8 final: Khmer Empire Phnom Penh (3-4 vs Sengkang Punggol)
2008: 1/8 final: Khmer Empire Phnom Penh (0-2 vs Young Lions)
2009: quarterf.: Phnom Penh Crown        (1-2, 3-3 vs Bangkok Glass)
2010: 1/8 final: Phnom Penh Crown        (1-2 vs Etoile)
2011: 1/8 final: Phnom Penh Crown        (0-4 vs Singapore Armed Forces)
2012: 1/8 final: Phnom Penh Crown        (3-4 vs Tampines Rovers)
2013: 1/8 final: Boeung Ket Rubber Field (1-4 vs Tanjong Pangar United)
2014: 1/8 final: Svay Rieng              (0-3 vs Albirex Niigata (S))
      1/8 final: Naga Corp               (0-5 vs Home United)
Hongkong teams in the Singapore football structure
Cup

2010: quarterf.: Kitchee                 (0-2, 4-4 vs Etoile)
Indonesian teams in the Singapore football structure
Cup

2005: quarterf.: Indonesia U-23          (0-3, 1-6 vs Singapore Armed Forces)
2009: 1/8 final: Pelita Jaya             (0-1 vs DPMM FC)
Laotian teams in the Singapore football structure
Cup

2012: 1/8 final: Yotha FC                (0-1 vs Albirex Niigata (S))
2013: 1/8 final: Lao Police FC           (0-4 vs DPMM FC)
2014: 1/8 final: SHB Champasak           (1-7 vs Loyola Meralco Sparks)
Malaysian teams in the Singapore football structure

Note that Harimau Muda A are the national youth team, and Harimau Muda B the U-19 side. Harimau Muda A joined the Queensland state league in Australia in 2014.

Championship

Harimau Muda B (2 top level seasons)
2013    11.Harimau Muda B          27  8  6 13  32-44  30
2014    season running

Harimau Muda A (1 top level season)
2012     4.Harimau Muda A          24 13  3  8  37-23  42

Cup

2006: 1/8 final: Malaysia U-23           (3-5 vs Balestier Khalsa)
2012: 1/8 final: Harimau Muda B          (0-3 vs Gombak United)
2014: 1/8 final: Harimau Muda B          (1-1 aet, 6-7 pen vs Tampines Rovers)
Myanmar teams in the Singapore football structure
Cup

2011: quarterf.: Okkthar United          (0-3, 3-1 vs Hougang United)
2012: quarterf.: Kanbawza                (1-3, 2-2 vs Loyola Meralco Sparks)
Philippine teams in the Singapore football structure
Cup

2012: semifinal: Loyola Meralco Sparks   (0-2, 0-3 vs Tampines Rovers; Loyola lost
                                          playoff for 3rd place vs Gombak United (0-4))
2013: semifinal: Global FC               (2-2, 1-2 vs Tanjong Pangar United; Global lost
                                          playoff for 3rd place vs Balestier Khalsa (0-1))
      quarterf.: Loyola Meralco Sparks   (1-2, 3-3 vs Tanjong Pangar United)
2014: 1/8 final: Global FC               (0-7 vs DPMM FC)
      quarterf.: Loyola Meralco Sparks   (0-2, 1-2 vs Home United)
Thai clubs in the Singapore football structure
Cup

2005: 1/8 final: Prov. Electr. Authority (0-1 vs Albirex Niigata (S))
2006: finalists: Chonburi Province       (2-3 aet vs Tampines Rovers)
      1/8 final: Prov. Electr. Authority (0-1 vs Woodlands Wellington)
2007: semifinal: Bangkok University      (0-2, 1-0 vs Tampines Rovers)
      1/8 final: Chonburi Province       (2-3 vs Balestier Khalsa)
2008: quarterf.: Bangkok University      (0-1, 0-0 vs Young Lions)
      quarterf.: Tobacco Monopoly        (1-1, 0-0, 2-4 pen vs Woodlands Wellington)
2009: finalists: Bangkok Glass           (0-1 vs Geylang United)
      semifinal: TTM Samut Sakhon        (0-6, 4-3 vs Bangkok Glass)
2010: winners:   Bangkok Glass           (1-0 vs Tampines Rovers)
2011: 1/8 final: Pattaya United          (1-2 vs Okkthar United)

Cambodia

Japanese clubs in the Cambodian football structure

After a decade of entering a farm team in the Singapore league, Albirex Niigata also gained access to the Cambodian league with a farm side based in Phnom Penh, which finished bottom of the league in their maiden season.

Championship

Albirex Niigata (PP) (1 top level season)
2014    12.Albirex Niigata (PP)    22  2  4 16  25-69  10 

Australia

Malaysia clubs in the Australian football structure

In 2014, Harimau Muda A, which had competed for one season (2012) in the Singapore league, entered the Queensland state league in Australia.

New Zealand clubs in the Australian football structure

An Auckland based club entered the Australian top level since the 1999/00 season (no league was organised in 2004/05). After 5 consecutive seasons of decidedly below par performances, the 2007/08 season saw a club from Wellington entering instead, which finished third in their third season, losing the preliminary final 2-4 away to Sydney FC. They reached the playoff stage of the league in the next two seasons as well.

Championship

Wellington Phoenix (Wellington) (7 top level seasons)
2007/08  8.Wellington Phoenix      21  5  5 11  25-37  20 
2008/09  6.Wellington Phoenix      21  7  5  9  23-31  26 
2009/10  4.Wellington Phoenix      27 10 10  7  37-29  40
        NB: Wellington Phoenix finished 3rd in the championship playoff
2010/11  6.Wellington Phoenix      30 12  5 13  39-41  41
        NB: Wellington Phoenix finished 6th in the championship playoff
2011/12  4.Wellington Phoenix      27 12  4 11  34-32  40
        NB: Wellington Phoenix finished 4th in the championship playoff
2012/13 10.Wellington Phoenix      27  7  6 14  31-49  27 
2013/14  9.Wellington Phoenix      27  7  7 13  36-51  28

Football Kings (Auckland) (5 top level seasons)
1999/00  8.Football Kingz          34 15  5 14  57-59  50
2000/01  8.Football Kingz          30 12  7 11  52-52  43
2001/02 13.Football Kingz          24  3  5 16  28-58  14
2002/03 11.Football Kingz          24  6  6 12  26-45  24
2003/04 13.Football Kingz          24  4  3 17  25-51  15

New Zealand Knights (Auckland) (2 top level seasons)
2005/06  8.New Zealand Knights     21  1  3 17  15-47   6
2006/07  8.New Zealand Knights     21  5  4 12  13-39  19

Hongkong

Chinese clubs in the Hongkong football structure

Xiangxue Pharmaceutical, based in Zhaoqing, China, were admitted to the Hongkong league in 2001. Since 2002/03, they were the reserve side of Chinese 2nd level side Guangzhou Xiangxue. They were dissolved after suffering relegation in 2005. They were replaced by another China-based club, Lanwa FC from Dongguan, renamed Lanwa Redbull after their first season and Sheffield United after their third (apparently because Lanwa intends to enter the Chinese league). In 2008/09 a new Chinese club, Xiangxue Eisiti, entered; they are the reserve team of Shenzhen Xiangxue in the Chinese Super League.

Championship

Xiangxue Pharmaceutical (4 top level seasons)
2001/02  6.Xiangxue Pharmaceutical 12  2  4  6  18-36  10
2002/03  5.Xiangxue Pharmaceutical 14  5  2  7  14-19  17 
2003/04  5.Xiangxue Pharmaceutical 18  6  4  8  28-26  22
2004/05  9.Xiangxue Pharmaceutical 16  3  2 11  12-39  11

Lanwa FC/Lanwa Redbull/Sheffield United (4 top level seasons)
2005/06  5.Lanwa FC                14  4  5  5  14-20  17
2006/07  5.Lanwa Redbull           18  8  2  8  37-26  26
2007/08  8.Lanwa Redbull           18  4  8  6  25-31  20
2008/09 10.Sheffield United        24  6  5 13  36-43  23

Xiangxue Eisiti (1 top level season)
2008/09 13.Xiangxue Eisiti         24  1  2 21  12-81   5

China

Hongkong | Malaysia | Philippines | Thailand

Until 1951, China did not organise a truly national (league-style) championship, but National Games were organised on 7 occasions between 1910 and 1948, involving representations from Hongkong as well as from Chinese in other Asian countries. Since 1959, ten more editions were organised, but these did not incorporate teams from Hongkong until 2001, when the tournament had become a competition for youth selections, and after the formerly British colony had returned to China (likewise, Macao teams participated in 2001 and 2005). There also were 7 editions of the Inter-Sectional Football Championship between 1926 and 1933, in which Hongkong participated as South China (the city hosted the event in 1927 and 1930).

Hongkong teams in the Chinese football structure

The 1929 Inter-Sectional Championship involved three teams, East China winning both its matches and North China losing both.
In the fifth National Games in Nanjing, 1933, Hongkong registered a record 23-0 win in their first round match against Jiangxi. The 1948 National Games featured a final round between the four winning quarterfinalists; Shanghai withdrew from this while the other three teams drew their matches against each other (Hongkong had actually beaten Army 2-0 but the match was later declared a 0-0 draw).

National Games

1910: winners:   South China             (1-0 vs East China)
1933: semifinal: Hongkong                (0-1 vs Shanghai)
1935: winners:   Hongkong                (3-1 vs Guangdong)
1948: winners:   Hongkong                (shared with Army and Police)

Inter-Sectional Championship

1926: winners:   South China             (8-3, 5-1 vs East China)
1927: winners:   South China             (4-1 vs East China)
1929: runner-up: South China             (in league format)
1930: winners:   South China             (4-4, 2-2, 4-1 vs East China)
Malaysian teams in the Chinese football structure

Note that in the 1935 National Games, the two losing semifinalists (Malaysia Chinese and Shanghai) first played against fourth place, with the winners (Malaysia Chinese) meeting the losing finalists (Guangdong) in an additional match for second place (as both had beaten Shanghai and lost to winners Hongkong, but not met each other before).

National Games

1935: runner-up: Malaysia Chinese        (1-0 vs Guangdong)
1948: quarterf.: Malaysia Chinese        (1-3 vs Army)
Philippine teams in the Chinese football structure

The first round of the 1948 National Games involved 10 clubs playing for 5 slots in the round of 16 (1/8 finals).

National Games

1948: 1st round: Philippines Chinese     (3-6 vs Zhejiang)
Thailand teams in the Chinese football structure

National Games

1948: quarterf.: Thailand Chinese        (1-2 vs Police)

Philippines

Indonesia | Singapore

For the 1935 National Football Championship, two foreign teams were invited, the military team Malaya Command from Singapore and the football federation of the Dutch East Indies (N.I.V.B.), which had made a favourable impression at the Far Eastern Games in Manila the previous year, trashing Japan 7-1 in their first match before succumbing to a very physical team from China the next day. The two guest teams promptly took the first two places.

Indonesian teams in the Philippine football structure

After their showing at the 1934 Far Eastern Games in Manila, the N.I.V.B. (Nederlandsch-Indische Voetbal Bond) were invited to send a team to the 1935 Philippines National Football Championship in February and March 1935. Unfortunately, by that time the N.I.V.B. was in utter turmoil, with all major Western and Central Javan city federations (Batavia, Bandoeng, Semarang, Djokjakarta, Buitenzorg, Soekaboemi) having left, essentially reducing the N.I.V.B. to Soerabaja (S.V.B.) and Malang. The team sent to Manila therefore corresponded to an S.V.B. selection, with a handful of players from Malang and Makassar (whose local federation were not even members of the N.I.V.B.). It started with 3 wins, defeating two local teams 6-0 before trouncing reigning champions University of Santo Tomás 5-0, but eventually had to settle for runners-up position behind the British military team Malaya Command based in Singapore.

Championship

N.I.V.B. (1 top level season)
1935     2.N.I.V.B.                 6  4  0  2  22- 7   8
Singapore teams in the Philippine football structure

Before World War II, British Army teams and visiting ships took part in various East Asian championships and cup competitions, such as those of Hongkong and Singapore. In 1935, the Singapore-based unit Malaya Command entered the Championship of the Philippines and won it unbeaten.

Championship

Malaya Command (1 top level season)
1935     1.Malaya Command           6  6  0  0  31- 7  12

Maldives

India | Sri Lanka | Thailand

Between 1987 and 2003, 16 editions of the POMIS Cup (President of Maldives Invitational Soccer Cup) were played on the Maldives. This tournament included invited clubs from India, Sri Lanka and Thailand and was expressly set up to provide the Maldive club teams with the opportunity to play foreign opposition.
Its inclusion here is debatable, as strictly speaking it is just an 'international club tournament'; however, as Maldives club managed to win the majority of the tournaments (just; 9 from 16), it is included nevertheless.
A comparable (though arguably more convincing) case is that of the Kashif & Shanghai Knockout Tournament in Guyana.

Indian clubs in the Maldive football structure

Indian teams won three editions of the POMIS Cup, and twice finished runners-up (in both cases by a club from Goa). Apart from the finalists, the only other known participants from India are FC Kochin (semifinalists 2001).

POMIS Cup

1990: winners:   Indian Youth Team       (4-1 vs Victory SC)
1991: finalists: Dempo SC                (0-0, 4-5 pen vs York FC)
1992: finalists: Dempo SC                (1-2 vs Valencia SC)
1993: winners:   Kerala SC               (2-1 vs Victory SC)
2003: winners:   Mahindra United         (3-1 vs Valencia SC)
Sri Lankan clubs in the Maldive football structure

Sri Lankan teams won three editions of the POMIS Cup, and twice finished runners-up. The final of the inaugural edition in 1987 was contested by two clubs from Sri Lanka. Apart from the finalists, the only other known participants from Sri Lanka are Negombo Youth (eliminated in group stage 2003).

POMIS Cup

1987: winners:   Renown SC               (0-0, 3-1 pen vs Saunders SC)
1987: finalists: Saunders SC             (0-0, 1-3 pen vs Renown SC)
1988: winners:   York FC                 (5-4 vs New Radiant SC)
1991: winners:   York FC                 (0-0, 5-4 pen vs Dempo SC)
1994: finalists: Colombo FC              (1-1, 5-7 pen vs New Radiant SC)
Thai clubs in the Maldive football structure

One Thai team won the tournament. Apart from the finalists, the only other known participants from Thailand are BEC Tero Sasana (eliminated in group stage 2001).

POMIS Cup

1998: winners:   Thailand U-19           (2-1 vs New Radiant)

Chile

Palestinian teams in the Chilean football structure

The Palestinian diaspora is well-represented in Chile, as exemplified by the Santiago club Palestino, champions of the country in 1955 and 1978. In 2003, the Palestinian olympic selection was admitted to the third division in Chile, in order to get reasonable match practice, something impossible in the areas suffering under Israeli occupation and colonisation.

The team, based in Santiago de Chile, first played (and lost) 8 group matches in the Apertura (played in six groups of 4 or 5 teams, with bonus points for the Clausura being awarded to the best teams) and then entered the northern group (there were two zones) of the Tercera División as Selección de Palestina, withdrawing after playing 19 from its 28 scheduled matches (the remaining 9 were awarded 0-2 against them) and finishing bottom of the league.

Tercera División A

2003 Ap  5.Selección de Palestina   8  0  0  8   3-39   0  [northern group C]
2003 Cl 15.Selección de Palestina  28  2  3 23  14-74   9  [northern group]

Surinam

French Guyanese teams in the Surinamese football structure

Football in Surinam is organised in two nationwide leagues (the Hoofdklasse and the Eerste Klasse) and a third level organised at district level. Marowijne is one of the districts bordering French Guyana, and two separate federations organise a third level league there, the Albina Sport Bond and the Moengo Sport Bond. Of these, the Albina league admits participants from across the border. No details are known, but French Guyana clubs to have entered the Albina league include ASJM (who played 2005/06 and 2007/08), Balaté (who entered 2006/07 and finished 5th) and Blessie and Charvein (who made their debut in the 2008/09 season; both reached the final round consisting of 7 clubs). As 2010/11 Albina champions, Blessie became the first club from French Guyana to reach the Lidbondentoernooi (along with 37 other clubs), but they did not reach the final stage of 10 clubs from which 2 earn promotion to the second, national level (and a third the right to enter a promotion/relegation playoff).

Saint Martin

The island of Saint Martin is split into two territories: the northern part belongs to France as Saint-Martin; the southern part is part of the (Kingdom of the) Netherlands as Sint Maarten. As no official league was organised in the Dutch part until the 1975/76 season, Dutch clubs entered the league on the French part in the early seventies; on the other hand, in the first ever league season on Sint Maarten (and possibly in later seasons as well), a club from the French part entered. In the beginning of the twenty-first century, tournaments between the top-2 of both leagues were organised occasionally.

Sint Maarten teams in Saint-Martin | Saint-Martin teams in Sint Maarten

Sint Maarten teams in the Saint-Martin football structure

In the 1970 season on Saint-Martin, two clubs from the Dutch part of the island entered, A.R.C. (Antillian Racing Club, founded in April 1970) and Shell; A.R.C. presumably reached the semi-final stage but their eventual finish is not known. A.R.C. continued to enter the Saint-Martin league until at least 1973, reportedly with good results, but no details are known. Both A.R.C. and Shell took part in the inaugural league season on Sint Maarten in 1975/76, finishing third and sixth (out of seven clubs) respectively.

In the 2011/12, the Division Excellence, an eight-team competition including two clubs, Flames and Hotspurs, from Sint Maarten (as well as three from both Saint-Martin and Saint-Barthélemy) was organised on Saint-Martin. While Hotspurs were eliminated in the group stage, Flames reached the final, taking the lead before losing out by the odd goal in three. The 2012/13 edition again had two Sint Maarten sides, and while debutants Strikers did not make an impression, Flames went one better than the previous season and won the second edition of the tournament. The third edition in 2014 is to have additional entrants from Anguilla and Sint Eustatius and can hardly be considered a domestic competition anymore.

Division Excellence

2012: finalists: Flames                  (1-2 vs Junior Stars)
2013: winners:   Flames                  (beat Attackers in final)

Saint-Martin teams in the Sint Maarten football structure

In the inaugural 1975/76 season of the league on Sint Maarten, one club from the French part of the island entered, Flamingo, finishing fourth out of seven clubs. It is not known whether they (or any other clubs from the French part of the island) entered the Sint Maarten league in later seasons, and neither is much known about Flamingo's record on Saint-Martin; only that a club called Flamingo FC, presumably identical, entered the league in 2009, finishing tenth and last.

Guyana

Antigua | Barbados | Saint Lucia | Trinidad and Tobago | USA

The Kashif & Shanghai Knockout Tournament, played annually around the turn of the year, currently is the most prestigious nationwide competition in Guyana. It originally was restricted to teams from Linden, but since the third edition (in 1992/93) clubs from all over the country enter, and there have been occasional appearances by foreign teams since 1995/96 (when Antiguan side Guydadli were the first guest entrants). Among the guest teams, two Trinidad teams won the tournament, and a Saint Lucia club once finished runners-up.
As the tournament is based on invitation and apparently not directly connected to the national FA (though there was talk of the FA intending to turn it into the premier club championship of the country), its inclusion here is debatable, as strictly speaking it is just an 'international club tournament'; however, given the domination (both numerically - most seasons only had participants from Guyana itself - and in terms of final appearances) of domestic clubs, it is included nevertheless.
A comparable (though arguably even less convincing) case is that of the President of Maldives Invitational Soccer Cup (POMIS Cup).

Finals traditionally are on New Year's Day, and the years indicated below refer to the year in which the tournament started (so the final and third place match usually were in the following year).

Antigua clubs in the Guyanese football structure

Antiguan club side Guydadli were the first foreign entrants; at their second participation, they played at the third level domestically.

Kashif & Shanghai Cup

1995: quarterf.: Guydadli                (0-3 vs Milerock)
2004: 1/8 final: Guydadli                (0-4 vs Topp XX)
Barbados clubs in the Guyanese football structure

There have been two appearances of Barbados clubs in the tournament. Tudor Bridge were a second level club when entering in 2004 (in fact, they had just been promoted from the third level); Caribbean United played at the fourth level domestically in 2011.

Kashif & Shanghai Cup

2004: 1/8 final: Tudor Bridge            (0-3 vs Eagles United)
2011: quarterf.: Caribbean United        (0-2 vs Milerock)
Saint Lucian clubs in the Guyanese football structure

There have been two appearances of Saint Lucian clubs in the tournament.

Kashif & Shanghai Cup

2004: finalists: Dennery                 (1-4 vs Conquerors)
2006: 1/8 final: Mabouya Valley          (0-4 vs Western Tigers)
Trinidadian clubs in the Guyanese football structure

There have been four appearances of Trinidadian clubs in the tournament; three won the tournament.

Kashif & Shanghai Cup

1998: winners:   Doc's Khelwalaas        (2-1 vs Victoria Kings) 
2000: 1/8 final: San Juan Jabloteh       (1-2 vs Melanie)     
2006: winners:   Joe Public              (1-0 vs Topp XX)
2011: winners:   Caledonia AIA           (2-0 vs Pele)
USA clubs in the Guyanese football structure

There have been three appearances of USA-based clubs in the tournament.

Kashif & Shanghai Cup

1996: semifinal: Guynamics (New York)    (lost vs Pele; won 3rd place match vs Milerock) 
2000: quarterf.: Guynamics (New York)    (1-3 vs Georgetown FC)     
2006: quarterf.: Team Guyana USA         (0-1 vs Western Tigers)

Canada

Saint Pierre et Miquelon

Saint Pierre et Miquelon clubs in the Canadian football structure

The French territory Saint Pierre et Miquelon boasts three football clubs, AS Saint-Pierraise, AS Miquelonnaise and AS Ilienne Amateur de Saint-Pierre, who play organised competitions on the islands since 1964. They never entered any stage of the French cup tournaments, but regularly enter regional contests at youth level in the Canadian province Newfoundland and Labrador. At the Newfoundland Cup (Coupe de Terre-Neuve), AS Ilienne Amateur won their category in 1978 (beating AS Saint-Pierraise 6-4 aet in the final), 1979 (beating Springdale in the "B category" final) and at least once between 1990 and 1995. Other Canadian tournaments with participation from Saint Pierre et Miquelon include the Newfoundland and Labrador Summer Games (Jeux d'été de Terre-Neuve), since 2000, and the Jeux de l'Acadie (in 1997 and 2003).

USA

Antigua | Bermuda | Canada | Puerto Rico

Antiguan clubs in the US football structure

In 2011, Antigua Barracuda, founded in 2010, joined the newly formed USL Professional Division, a 'third level' league. They finished bottom of the American Division, one of two 6-team groups. Their next season was even worse, finishing last in the 11-team league.

USL Professional Division

2011    10.Antigua Barracuda       24  9  2 13  32-32  29
2012    11.Antigua Barracuda       24  5  1 18  16-30  16

Bermudan clubs in the US football structure

In 2007, a club from Bermuda, the Bermuda Hogges, entered the USL Second Division, a 'third level' league below the USL First Division which also features a team from Puerto Rico. In 2010, they left this league to enter the 'fourth level' USL Premier Development League.

USL Second Division

2007    11.Bermuda Hogges          20  3  3 14  16-45  12
2008     9.Bermuda Hogges          20  5  2 13  21-50  17
2009     9.Bermuda Hogges          20  4  4 12  19-43  16
Canadian clubs in the US football structure

The North American Soccer League (NASL) was the second attempt (after the American Soccer League in the 1920s) to establish a nationwide, professional association football league in North America. Unlike its predecessor, and as its name indicates, it was not restricted to the United States but also included various clubs (or rather franchises) from Canada. As these were not many and mostly played a secondary role, we nevertheless include them in this section as 'guest' teams in a foreign country. The following Canada-based teams played one or more seasons in the NASL, which was founded in 1968 and folded after the 1984 season: Toronto Falcons, Vancouver Royals (both only played 1968, folding after one season), Toronto Metros (1971-1984; renamed Toronto Metros-Croatia in 1975 and Toronto Blizzard in 1979), Montréal Olympique (1971-1973, folded after three seasons), Vancouver Whitecaps (1974-1984), Edmonton Drillers (1979-1982; formed by relocation of Oakland Stompers, folded after four seasons), Calgary Boomers (1981; formed by relocation of Memphis Rogues, folded after one season) and Montreal Manic (1981-1983; formed by relocation of Philadelphia Fury, folded after three seasons).

Of these, Toronto Croatia (formerly Metros, Metros-Croatia and Blizzard during their NASL days) won the Canadian Premier Soccer League in 2000 and 2004 and its successor, the Canadian Soccer League, in 2007, making them the first club to win both the American and Canadian top level leagues.

In 2007, a Canadian club (Toronto FC) made its maiden appearance in the current top level league in the United States, Major League Soccer (MLS), established in 1996. In 2011, a second Canadian club, Vancouver Whitecaps (former NASL members) followed, and 2012 saw a third entrant from Canada, Montreal Impact.
So far the Canadian sides have not made much of an impression: between 2007 2012 the 3 clubs played 9 seasons (taken together) and all finished the regular season with a negative record; however, Vancouver Whitecaps qualified for the 2012 Wild Card game after finishing 5th in the Western Conference but lost it 1-2 to defending champions and eventual winners Los Angeles Galaxy. In 2013 both Montreal Impact and Vancouver Whitecaps finished with a positive record (while Toronto FC had a negative record for the seventh successive season), and Montreal reached the Wild Card game after finishing 5th in the Eastern Conference but lost it 0-3 to Houston Dynamo.

In addition, there are several Canadian clubs in the American lower level structure. Montreal Impact won the USL First Division (then a second level league without possibility of promotion) title in 2004 and 2009, Vancouver Whitecaps in 2006 and 2008. In 2009, Vancouver Whitecaps finished runners-up after an all-Canadian final. Note that the Canadian franchises do not enter the tournament for the US Open Cup. Since 2008, the top three Canadian professional clubs (Toronto FC, Montréal Impact and Vancouver Whitecaps) play a 6-match qualifying competition, dubbed the Canadian Championship, to determine the Canadian qualifiers for the CONCACAF Champions League; the fourth edition, in 2011, saw a fourth entrant (FC Edmonton).

Championship (NASL)

1973: semifinal: Toronto Metros          (0-3 vs Philadelphia Atoms)
1975: quarterf.: Toronto Metros-Croatia  (0-1 vs Tampa Bay Rowdies)
1976: winners:   Toronto Metros-Croatia  (3-0 vs Minnesota Kicks)
1977: quarterf.: Toronto Metros-Croatia  (0-0 (shootout loss), 0-1 vs Rochester Lancers)
1978: quarterf.: Vancouver Whitecaps     (0-1, 1-2 vs Portland Timbers)
1979: winners:   Vancouver Whitecaps     (2-1 vs Tampa Bay Rowdies)
1980: quarterf.: Edmonton Drillers       (0-1, 3-2, 0-3 vs Fort Lauderdale Strikers)
1981: quarterf.: Montreal Manic          (3-2, 2-4, 2-4 vs Chicago Sting)
1982: quarterf.: Montreal Manic          (3-2, 0-1 aet, 1-4 vs Fort Lauderdale Strikers)
      quarterf.: Toronto Blizzard        (2-4, 2-1, 2-4 vs Seattle Sounders)
      quarterf.: Vancouver Whitecaps     (1-5, 1-0, 1-2 vs San Diego Sockers)
1983: finalists: Toronto Blizzard        (0-2 vs Tulsa Roughnecks)
      semifinal: Montreal Manic          (1-1 (shootout loss), 1-0, 0-3 vs Tulsa Roughnecks)
      quarterf.: Vancouver Whitecaps     (1-0, 3-4, 0-1 vs Toronto Blizzard)
1984: finalists: Toronto Blizzard        (0-2 vs Chicago Sting)
      semifinal: Vancouver Whitecaps     (1-0 aet, 1-3, 3-4 vs Chicago Sting)

Championship (MLS)

Toronto FC (7 top level seasons)
2007    13.Toronto FC              30  6  7 17  25-49  25 
2008    12.Toronto FC              30  9  8 13  34-43  35
2009    12.Toronto FC              30 10  9 11  37-46  39
2010    11.Toronto FC              30  9  8 13  33-41  35
2011    16.Toronto FC              34  6 15 13  36-59  33
2012    19.Toronto FC              34  5  8 21  36-62  23
2013    17.Toronto FC              34  6 11 17  30-47  29

Vancouver Whitecaps (3 top level seasons)
2011    18.Vancouver Whitecaps     34  6 10 18  35-55  28
2012    11.Vancouver Whitecaps     34 11 10 13  35-41  43 
      wild card: Vancouver Whitecaps     (1-2 vs Los Angeles Galaxy)
2013    13.Vancouver Whitecaps     34 13  9 12  53-45  47

Montreal Impact (2 top level seasons)
2012    12.Montreal Impact         34 12  6 16  45-51  42
2013    11.Montreal Impact         34 14  7 13  50-49  49 
      wild card: Montreal Impact         (0-3 vs Houston Dynamo)
Puerto Rican clubs in the US football structure

Since 2004, the Islanders, from Bayamón on Puerto Rico, play in the USL First Division (formerly A League), a 'second level' league without possibility of promotion to the 'first level' MLS. In 2008 they finished top of the table in the regular season, and reached the final of the championship playoffs, in which they lost to Vancouver Whitecaps. Even more sensationally, the Puerto Rico Islanders reached the semifinals of the CONCACAF Champions League 2008/09, for which they had qualified as Puerto Rican representatives, only losing to Mexican giants Cruz Azul after a penalty shoot-out following a 3-3 aggregate draw. In 2010, the Islanders won the temporary USSF Division 2 Professional League, again a 'second level' league, in spite of having finished only 8th (from 12 clubs) during the regular season. They then entered the Puerto Rican championship but lost the final 0-3 on aggregate against CA River Plate. In 2011 they played in the North American Soccer League, again a second level league.

USL First Division

2004     9.Puerto Rico Islanders   28  5  6 17  22-48  21  
2005     7.Puerto Rico Islanders   28 10  8 10  46-43  38    
2006     6.Puerto Rico Islanders   28 10  8 10  38-36  38  
2007     6.Puerto Rico Islanders   28 10 10  8  35-34  40  
2008     1.Puerto Rico Islanders   30 15  9  6  43-23  54
      finalists: Puerto Rico Islanders   (1-2 vs Vancouver Whitecaps)
2009     3.Puerto Rico Islanders   30 15  8  7  44-31  53
      semifinal: Puerto Rico Islanders   (1-2, 1-2 vs Montreal Impact)

USSF Division 2 Professional League

2010     8.Puerto Rico Islanders   30  9 10 11  37-35  37
      winners:   Puerto Rico Islanders   (2-0, 1-1 vs Carolina RailHawks)

North American Soccer League

2011     2.Puerto Rico Islanders   28 15  7  6  41-32  52
      semifinal: Puerto Rico Islanders   (1-3, 1-2 vs Fort Lauderdale Strikers)
2012     3.Puerto Rico Islanders   28 11  8  9  32-30  41
      quarterf.: Puerto Rico Islanders   (1-2 vs Minnesota Stars)

Overview (Europe)

Notes: no distinction is made between Germany and West Germany, between Ireland (pre-1920) and Northern Ireland, between Serbia with or without Montenegro (or when still called Yugoslavia), or between Cyprus before and after the de facto secession of the North. Non-UEFA members (e.g. Northern Cyprus) not included.

Champions in Two European Countries
Ararat Yerevan           Soviet Union, Armenia 
Baník Ostrava            Czechoslovakia, Czech Republic 
Concordia Zagreb         Yugoslavia, Croatia 
Crvena zvezda            Yugoslavia, Serbia
CSKA Moskva              Soviet Union, Russia 
+ Derry City             Northern Ireland, (Republic of) Ireland 
Dinamo Tbilisi           Soviet Union, Georgia 
Dinamo Zagreb            Yugoslavia, Croatia 
Dynamo Kyiv              Soviet Union, Ukraine 
Dynamo Minsk             Soviet Union, Belarus 
Građanski Zagreb -       Yugoslavia, Croatia 
Hajduk Split             Yugoslavia, Croatia 
+ IC Oradea -            Hungary, Romania 
Internacional Bratislava Czechoslovakia, Slovakia 
Partizan Beograd         Yugoslavia, Serbia
+ Rapid Wien             Austria, Germany 
FK Sarajevo              Yugoslavia, Bosnia-Herzegovina 
Slavia Praha             Czechoslovakia, Czech Republic 
Slovan Bratislava        Czechoslovakia, Slovakia 
Sparta Praha             Czechoslovakia, Czech Republic 
Spartak Moskva           Soviet Union, Russia 
Vardar Skopje            Yugoslavia (*), Macedonia 
Željezničar Sarajevo     Yugoslavia, Bosnia-Herzegovina 

+ clubs preceded by + were champions of two currently existing
  UEFA members; among these 3, Derry City and Rapid Wien also
  won domestic cups in both countries involved, while IC Oradea
  won the cup in Romania (as Progresul Oradea) but not in Hungary;
  Derry City also collected League Cups in the Republic of Ireland, 
  but not in Northern Ireland (where the tournament was introduced 
  after their withdrawal; they did win 1 Gold Cup and 2 City Cups).
- clubs followed by - have ceased to exist.
* Vardar had their 1986/87 championship in Yugoslavia revoked
  after legal procedures but entered the UEFA Champions' Cup.

Countrywise

FORMER CZECHOSLOVAKIA

Baník Ostrava
Czechoslovakia Champions     1975/76, 1979/80, 1980/81
Czech Republic Champions     2003/04 

Internacional Bratislava
Czechoslovakia Champions     1958/59 
Slovakia Champions           1999/00, 2000/01 

Slavia Praha
Czechoslovakia Champions     1925, 1928/29, 1929/30, 1930/31, 1932/33,
                             1933/34, 1934/35, 1936/37, 1946/47
Czech/Moravia Champions      1939/40, 1940/41, 1941/42, 1942/43 
Czech Republic Champions     1995/96, 2007/08, 2008/09

Slovan Bratislava (includes ŠK Bratislava)
Czechoslovakia Champions     1949, 1950, 1951, 1955, 1969/70,
                             1973/74, 1974/75, 1991/92 
Slovakia Champions           1939/40, 1940/41, 1941/42, 1943/44, 1993/94,
                             1994/95, 1995/96, 1998/99, 2008/09, 2010/11,
                             2012/13

Sparta Praha 
Czechoslovakia Champions     1925/26, 1927, 1931/32, 1935/36, 1937/38,
                             1945/46, 1947/48, 1952, 1954, 1964/65,
                             1966/67, 1983/84, 1984/85, 1986/87, 1987/88,
                             1988/89, 1989/90, 1990/91, 1992/93
Czech/Moravia Champions      1938/39, 1943/44
Czech Republic Champions     1993/94, 1994/95, 1996/97, 1997/98, 1998/99,
                             1999/00, 2000/01, 2002/03, 2004/05, 2006/07,
                             2009/10

GERMANY/AUSTRIA

Rapid Wien
Austria Champions            1911/12, 1912/13, 1915/16, 1916/17, 1918/19,
                             1919/20, 1920/21, 1922/23, 1928/29, 1929/30,
                             1934/35, 1937/38, 1939/40, 1940/41, 1945/46,
                             1947/48, 1950/51, 1951/52, 1953/54, 1955/56,
                             1956/57, 1959/60, 1963/64, 1966/67, 1967/68,
                             1981/82, 1982/83, 1986/87, 1987/88, 1995/96,
                             2004/05, 2007/08
Germany Champions            1940/41   

IRELAND

Derry City
Northern Ireland Champions   1964/65   
Rep. of Ireland Champions    1988/89, 1996/97 

HUNGARY/ROMANIA

IC Oradea
Hungary Champions            1943/44 as Nagyváradi AC
Romania Champions            1948/49 as IC Oradea

FORMER SOVIET UNION

Ararat Erevan
Soviet Union Champions       1973    
Armenia Champions            1993    

CSKA Moskva
Soviet Union Champions       1946, 1947, 1948, 1950, 1951,
                             1970, 1991
Russia Champions             2003, 2005, 2006, 2012/13, 2013/14

Dinamo Tbilisi
Soviet Union Champions       1964, 1978
Georgia Champions            1990, 1991, 1991/92, 1992/93, 1993/94,
                             1994/95, 1995/96, 1996/97, 1997/98, 1998/99,
                             2002/03, 2004/05, 2007/08, 2012/13, 2013/14

Dynamo Kyiv
Soviet Union Champions       1961, 1966, 1967, 1968, 1971,
                             1974, 1975, 1977, 1980, 1981,
                             1985, 1986, 1990  
Ukraine Champions            1992/93, 1993/94, 1994/95, 1995/96, 1996/97,
                             1997/98, 1998/99, 1999/00, 2000/01, 2002/03,
                             2003/04, 2006/07, 2008/09

Dynamo Minsk
Soviet Union Champions       1982    
Belarus Champions            1992, 1992/93, 1993/94, 1994/95, 1995,
                             1997, 2004   
 
Spartak Moskva
Soviet Union Champions       1936 (fall), 1938, 1939, 1952, 1953,
                             1956. 1958, 1962, 1969, 1979,
                             1987, 1989  
Russia Champions             1992, 1993, 1994, 1996, 1997,
                             1998, 1999, 2000, 2001 

Zenit Sankt Peterburg
Soviet Union Champions       1984
Russia Champions             2007, 2010, 2011/12

FORMER YUGOSLAVIA

Concordia Zagreb
Yugoslavia Champions         1930, 1932
Croatia Champions            1941/42 

Crvena zvezda Beograd 
Yugoslavia Champions         1951, 1952/53, 1955/56, 1956/57, 1958/59,
                             1959/60, 1963/64, 1967/68, 1968/69, 1969/70,
                             1972/73, 1976/77, 1979/80, 1980/81, 1983/84,
                             1987/88, 1989/90, 1990/91, 1991/92
Serbia-Montenegro Champions  1994/95, 1999/00, 2000/01, 2003/04
Serbia Champions             2006/07, 2013/14
NB: Serbia-Montenegro championships include all titles won since 1992/93,
    when the former Yugoslav championship became that of Serbia and 
    Montenegro though not yet in name; the 1991/92 league still included
    clubs from Bosnia-Herzegovina and Macedonia so is included under
    Yugoslavia

Dinamo Zagreb
Yugoslavia Champions         1947/48, 1953/54, 1957/58, 1981/82
Croatia Champions            1992/93, 1995/96, 1996/97, 1997/98, 1998/99,
                             1999/00, 2002/03, 2005/06, 2006/07, 2007/08,
                             2008/09, 2009/10, 2010/11, 2011/12, 2012/13,
                             2013/14

Građanski Zagreb
Yugoslavia Champions         1923, 1926, 1928, 1936/37, 1939/40 
Croatia Champions            1942/43 

Hajduk Split
Yugoslavia Champions         1927, 1929, 1950, 1952, 1954/55,
                             1970/71, 1973/74, 1974/75, 1978/79 
Croatia Champions            1992, 1993/94, 1994/95, 2000/01, 2003/04,
                             2004/05
NB: does not include 'titles' in 1941 and 1946 in Croatia, as the
    regional league there was meant as qualifying tournament for the
    Yugoslav championship (which was cancelled)

Partizan Beograd
Yugoslavia Champions         1946/47, 1948/49, 1960/61, 1961/62, 1962/63,
                             1964/65, 1975/76, 1977/78, 1982/83, 1985/86,
                             1986/87
Serbia-Montenegro Champions  1992/93, 1993/94, 1995/96, 1996/97, 1998/99,
                             2001/02, 2002/03, 2004/05
Serbia Champions             2007/08, 2008/09, 2009/10, 2010/11, 2011/12,
                             2012/13
NB: Serbia-Montenegro championships include all titles won since 1992/93,
    when the former Yugoslav championship became that of Serbia and 
    Montenegro though not yet in name; the 1991/92 league still included
    clubs from Bosnia-Herzegovina and Macedonia so is included under
    Yugoslavia

FK Sarajevo
Yugoslavia Champions         1966/67, 1984/85 
Bosnia-Herzegovina Champions 1998/99, 2006/07
NB: the 1998/99 championship did not involve clubs from the 'Republik
    Srpska' who did not enter the Bosnian league until 2002; the Bosnian
    champions were excluded from the UEFA Champions League (qualifying)
    until the 2000/01 season

Željezničar Sarajevo
Yugoslavia Champions         1971/72 
Bosnia-Herzegovina Champions 1997/98, 2000/01, 2001/02, 2009/10, 2011/12,
                             2012/13
NB: the three championships between 1997 and 2002 did not involve clubs
    from the 'Republik Srpska' who did not enter the Bosnian league until
    2002; the Bosnian champions were excluded from the UEFA Champions
    League (qualifying) until the 2000/01 season

Vardar Skopje
Yugoslavia Champions         1986/87 (revoked)
Macedonia Champions          1992/93, 1993/94, 1994/95, 2001/02, 2002/03,
                             2011/12, 2012/13
NB: 10 clubs had started the 1986/87 season with a deduction of 6 points,
    among them Partizan and Crvena zvezda, because of the events in the
    previous season.  Vardar Skopje, who had not been deducted 6 points,
    won the title, and participated in the 1987/88 Champions Cup, but the
    points deduction was later revoked after more legal proceedings, and 
    the title was awarded to Partizan, who headed the table without the 
    deduction.

About this document

Note the Disclaimers in the Introduction.

Thanks to Sean DeLoughry (seandeloughry@yahoo.co.uk), who provided the last section (on champions in two European countries); many thanks to Alexey Khaydukov and Hans Schöggl for numerous suggestions on additional cases, and thanks to Dinant Abbink, Dale Arnett, Yaniv Bleicher, Fer van Dijk, Sheridan Elliott, László Földesi, Lluís Gabarró, Erik Garin, Mark Gleeson, Kent Hedlundh, Oshebeng Koonyaditse, Hassanin Mubarak, Henry Ong Heong Yong, Heikki Pietarinen, Jan Schoenmakers, Elisha Shohat and Andre Zlotkowski for various additions, corrections and suggestions.

Prepared and maintained by Karel Stokkermans for the Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation

Author: Karel Stokkermans (karel@rsssf.com)
Last updated: 7 Aug 2014

(C) Copyright Karel Stokkermans and RSSSF 2007/14
All rights reserved.